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post #1 of 9 Old 12-06-2015, 03:42 PM Thread Starter
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Refinishing Help

I recently squired these two nightstands, they are by Knoll Associates from the 1960ish. It's definitely veneer, and I'm almost certain Its walnut. There's in great shape structurally but need some finishing love. There is one large chip in the corner of the top that exposes the particle board under the veneer, was covered up by touch up marker by previous owner.

I was told Restore- a- finish may be a good option to disguise Cover up most of the wear but i don't have experience with that product. Unfortunately my work space is my living room(not my wife's favorite) so I'm limited in what I can do, easiest solution to freshen these up is what I'm looking for.


Any recommendations for finishing and handling the large chip would be much appreciated. Attached are some pics.

Thanks Everybody!
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post #2 of 9 Old 12-06-2015, 06:35 PM
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Your two tables look pretty good. Especially if they are really 50 years old.
In the '60's, the primary finish would have been lacquer.
If they have a lacquer finish, I would wipe them down good with a liberal amount of Liquid Sandpaper.
This will clean all the grease, furniture wax and oils off the tables.
Re-coat with two coats of lacquer. Badda bam, badda boom.
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post #3 of 9 Old 12-06-2015, 07:11 PM
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I would wait until late spring or summer and work on them outdoors. I would start with paint and varnish remover and completely remove the finish. The damaged corner if you have a router you might clamp a straight edge to it and route that damaged place out and insert a piece of solid wood to cover that. Then sand everything and put a clear finish on it. The simplest would be a wipe on polyurethane. If you have the means of spraying you might use lacquer. If you don't want to see the open grain of the wood in the finish you might consider using a pastewood grain filler prior to finishing it. This would give you a better chance to put a glass like finish on it.
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post #4 of 9 Old 12-07-2015, 09:04 AM Thread Starter
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Appreciate the recommendations. Still curious about the restore-a-finish. I'm sure it's a more "band aid" approach but if it will get them looking good again, seems like the easiest way to go. Anyone have experience with it.

Also, for the chipped corner will wood putty adhear to the particle board? At just fill it with that before finishing.

Thanks!
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post #5 of 9 Old 12-07-2015, 10:46 AM
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I won't comment on the restore-a-finish. I've never used it. Wood putty will adhere to particle board very well. A better filler would be a burn-in. It's a colored shellac stick you melt into a void with a wide blade soldering iron. It's not that expensive to get into and the sticks have a practically unlimited shelf life and can be used on other woodwork and furniture. Most of the sticks I have were bought in the 1980's. To make a good match you buy several sticks around the color you need and melt them together to get the background color of the wood. Once the background is filled and level it will appear like a light colored patch. Then you can take graining pens and draw the grain on it. I know it sounds difficult but takes patience more than anything. The graining pens are like a brown sharpie you just put lines across the patch so it isn't a solid color. The wood isn't a solid color so to make a patch less visible you need to recreate the same look.
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post #6 of 9 Old 12-12-2015, 08:43 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the advice, going to try and tackle these over the next few days
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post #7 of 9 Old 12-13-2015, 06:37 AM
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For these sort of things I refer to specialty shops such as Furniture Repair Products in Orange Calif.

http://www.woodrepairproducts.com

These guys should have everything you need and the expertise to advise to repair this sort of damage. Nice friendly folks there and they'll ship.

FYSA

I don't not have an affiliation with them what so ever, they are a company when I'm in the states that I go to for advice , training and to buy their products.
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post #8 of 9 Old 12-13-2015, 08:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sancho View Post
For these sort of things I refer to specialty shops such as Furniture Repair Products in Orange Calif.

http://www.woodrepairproducts.com

These guys should have everything you need and the expertise to advise to repair this sort of damage. Nice friendly folks there and they'll ship.

FYSA

I don't not have an affiliation with them what so ever, they are a company when I'm in the states that I go to for advice , training and to buy their products.
The Mohawk dealer I buy from gave me a couple of the brush tip graining markers. They are the handiest markers I've ever used. Where regular graining pens make marks that you really have to work at to keep from looking like a sharpie the brush tip makes marks that look more like natural wood grain.
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post #9 of 9 Old 01-08-2016, 04:04 PM
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They really got some good stuff. Im amazed at all the colour crayons they have. They have a kit with every colour ad variation etc that can match virtually any colour. They also make a dewing spray to help clean up the wax when repairing .
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