Rebuilding a Weber - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 28 Old 01-20-2015, 02:08 PM Thread Starter
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Rebuilding a Weber

I'm rebuilding a 1997 Weber Spirit 900 for my dad. All is going well but I'm not sure what kind of wood they used on the slats. They are shot. Any suggestions as to what I should use? And how I should finish it? Here is an internet picture of one like mine.
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post #2 of 28 Old 01-20-2015, 02:25 PM
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A lot depends on what materials you have available in your area and how much money you are willing to spend. My first choice would be teak. Another good wood would be white oak. If push come to shove you could use pressure treated pine if you could find some dry enough you could put a film finish on it. Sometimes a mom and pop lumber company will have pressure treated wood in their stores for months so it's dry enough to use and finish when you bring it home.
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post #3 of 28 Old 01-20-2015, 02:26 PM
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I dont know what they used. Based on the greyed wood in that photo, I would guess they used cedar, MAYBE teak. (I doubt teak because its expensive for that)

Either way, I would go with cedar. No issues with teak except cost. You can roll into HD and pick up a chunk of cedar 10x what you need for next to nothing.
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post #4 of 28 Old 01-20-2015, 02:36 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks. Yeah, I thought about cedar. So this brings up another question. I have plenty of aromatic red cedar from trees I have cut on my property. Will this work? And if so, what kind of finish should I put on it? Maybe Spar Urethane? Or maybe just mineral oil? I know that it may be a little blotchy, but that doesn't matter too much. It's not a piece of furniture, it's a grill to be used. Or should I just do as you said and get the regular cedar at a big box store? I also have some white oak.

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post #5 of 28 Old 01-20-2015, 02:40 PM
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I'd choose white oak or teak for its durability...cedar is a bit soft for this use in my opinion.

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post #6 of 28 Old 01-20-2015, 02:41 PM
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How about a piece of Corian instead of wood?

I've got a later version of the same grill, and it uses molded plastic instead of wood. I like it a lot better than wood. I think plastic/corian would be more durable.
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post #7 of 28 Old 01-20-2015, 02:47 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by pweller View Post
How about a piece of Corian instead of wood?

I've got a later version of the same grill, and it uses molded plastic instead of wood. I like it a lot better than wood. I think plastic/corian would be more durable.
Hmmm. That sounds like a good idea. I wonder where I would get some of that? Would that melt if something hot was put on it?

Bud

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post #8 of 28 Old 01-20-2015, 02:58 PM
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Hmmm. That sounds like a good idea. I wonder where I would get some of that? Would that melt if something hot was put on it?
I bought some of it on ebay, from this seller. You can just e-mail the sizes you need, and he'll send a quote.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/150626663536...%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

You could also get some from a local kitchen counter top supplier.

Maybe you could find 2 cutting boards that you could cut down.

I understand that you can use woodworking blades to cut corian, but I haven't tried myself yet.

I don't know if it would melt, but I find I don't put really hot stuff on the table anyway. Remember, mine is basically plastic (I think Weber phased out all of the wood for plastic).

I wonder if the later molded tables would fit your grill? Maybe that would be easiest. Those tables might be available through Weber or a parts supplier. Depending on the price, it might be the best solution.

edit the edit: just found the one table, it's $85 here: http://www.appliancefactoryparts.com...496671/135755/. I'd go with the Corian, since you'd need two of these plus a trim piece on the side.

Last edited by pweller; 01-20-2015 at 03:16 PM.
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post #9 of 28 Old 01-20-2015, 03:55 PM
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might depend on the model, but my parents bought a weber maybe 4 or 5 years ago, still had stamped metal tables. For the price weber charges, it should be.

Im not sure Id choose plastic, whoever does use it, likely uses a high temp type, as the table adjacent to the chamber can get quite hot. Putting hot pans down is another concern, though theres probably not any that support that much heat.

If your not keeping with the wood, you could use metal plate, stone/tile. Nice part about wood is that it is basically disposable... if it gets worn or stain or cracked, 10minutes with a screw gun and its new.

I personally laid a stone tile on the wood table for my smoker. Its not attached or anything, not like its going anywhere. but I can pick it up to clean it if I was ever so inclined. protects the wood to some degree, and it looks kinda nice. The wood was dimensional lumber, not that Im laying my steak on the bare surface or anything, but all the same, Id avoid pressure treated if possible.
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post #10 of 28 Old 01-20-2015, 05:23 PM
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If you want to be period correct use redwwod.Had one and that's what mine was.
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post #11 of 28 Old 01-20-2015, 05:25 PM Thread Starter
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If you want to be period correct use redwwod.Had one and that's what mine was.
That's probably what this was originally too. I will see if I can find some. That'd be nice.

Bud

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post #12 of 28 Old 01-20-2015, 06:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TS3660 View Post
I'm rebuilding a 1997 Weber Spirit 900 for my dad. All is going well but I'm not sure what kind of wood they used on the slats. They are shot. Any suggestions as to what I should use? And how I should finish it? Here is an internet picture of one like mine.
I think its cedar.

Al


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post #13 of 28 Old 01-20-2015, 07:23 PM
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Too bad you are so far away, I have a piece of corian I would give you. Still corian will sag when it sits in the sun. It would have to be supported from something underneath.
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post #14 of 28 Old 01-21-2015, 01:23 PM
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I've always though of that class of barbecue as disposable even though there are lots of parts available. Every one I've seen has rusted out in so many places.

As to the wood, I think just about any wood is fine. It's going to get lots of stuff spilled on it so I'd go for inexpensive/available and replace it every couple of years.
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post #15 of 28 Old 01-21-2015, 01:32 PM
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Many of those weber grills are cast aluminum that doesn't rust away. While I'd agree with you on the class of grills in general, weber is in a class all its own for many of their models.

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post #16 of 28 Old 01-21-2015, 04:48 PM Thread Starter
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Well, I have looked around for redwood and there is nobody in my area that has any. So, I guess I'll use some cedar from some trees I've cut down on my property.

Bud

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post #17 of 28 Old 01-21-2015, 06:47 PM
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I believe the original grills were cedar not redwood.
I have a 10 year old Genesis grill that I replaced with a new Summit grill. The old grill was still in pretty good shape that I'm rebuilding now. New burners, flavoring bars, igniter and a good cleaning. Will be installing it at the lake house as soon as I run a gas line to it. These grills are in a class if their own.

My tables are the minded plastic. In your case I would think about a chunk of Corian. Try a kitchen supplier as a sink cut out might work. The stuff does sag but your span is small and you can always put a backer behind it.
A marble supplier may have scraps of various stones or synthetic materials.

These will work better than wood as they don't absorb grease or hot pans can be put directly on them.

Just a thought

Cut it twice, measure once and it's still too short.
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post #18 of 28 Old 01-21-2015, 06:54 PM Thread Starter
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I have to also figure out how to make, and where to mount a beverage holder. Any ideas out there?

Bud

"Veggie burgers aren't bad if you put enough meat on them"
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post #19 of 28 Old 01-21-2015, 08:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unclefester View Post
I believe the original grills were cedar not redwood.
I have a 10 year old Genesis grill that I replaced with a new Summit grill. The old grill was still in pretty good shape that I'm rebuilding now. New burners, flavoring bars, igniter and a good cleaning. Will be installing it at the lake house as soon as I run a gas line to it. These grills are in a class if their own.

My tables are the minded plastic. In your case I would think about a chunk of Corian. Try a kitchen supplier as a sink cut out might work. The stuff does sag but your span is small and you can always put a backer behind it.
A marble supplier may have scraps of various stones or synthetic materials.

These will work better than wood as they don't absorb grease or hot pans can be put directly on them.

Just a thought
Flavoring bars? I'm licking my chops.

Corian is boss. You'll play he'll getting it to sag. I used it on my last router table.

Hey OP do you need to re surface the bowl? Aren't they coated with ceramic?

Al


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post #20 of 28 Old 01-21-2015, 08:08 PM
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I think those are just cast aluminum bodies aren't they?

The tools don't make the craftsman....
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