Re-finishing a countertop - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 6 Old 04-22-2011, 04:50 PM Thread Starter
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Question Re-finishing a countertop

Hi all,

With the remodel, my wife wants to take existing cabinets that already varnished (probably at least 10+ years ago) and paint them white. Would you suggest painting over the varnish or would you sand them down first?

Thanks!

Curtis
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post #2 of 6 Old 04-22-2011, 04:55 PM
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I definitely would sand them some to scuff up the surface so that the paint has a little more to stick too. You should be safe by using a latex based paint, as it can cover both oil and latex..... NEVER PUT OIL BASED OVER LATEX! ......... DAMHIKT

Make sure to use a good quality primer too. Don't go with the bargain basement stuff from the box stores.

Hope this helps

Fabian

Fabian

I used to be fairly indecisive, but now....... I'm not so sure.
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post #3 of 6 Old 04-22-2011, 05:04 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by thegrgyle View Post
I definitely would sand them some to scuff up the surface so that the paint has a little more to stick too. You should be safe by using a latex based paint, as it can cover both oil and latex..... NEVER PUT OIL BASED OVER LATEX! ......... DAMHIKT

Make sure to use a good quality primer too. Don't go with the bargain basement stuff from the box stores.

Hope this helps

Fabian
Would you use a random orbital? I have honestly never done any sanding... yes yes I know I just put out how new I am... LOL

Curtis
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post #4 of 6 Old 04-22-2011, 05:16 PM
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Would you use a random orbital? I have honestly never done any sanding... yes yes I know I just put out how new I am... LOL

Curtis
A ROS would work fine for this application.... don't use a belt sander.... It can take off alot in a hurry, especially if you don't have much experience with one.

Take care in making sure that the sander stays flat with the surface..... It doesn't take much to accidently round an edge by slipping off the edge. As far as grit goes, 150-220 grit should work fine... I have done it and am real happy with the results.

Fabian

I used to be fairly indecisive, but now....... I'm not so sure.
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post #5 of 6 Old 04-22-2011, 06:53 PM
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Used to paint for a living....
Clean the cabinets first using a mix of warm water and vinegar to de-grease them. Then sand, 150-180-220 to just scuff up the finish. Prime with a good stain sealing primer (oil based or shellac based) to prevent the stain from bleeding through the paint. Fix any dings and re-prime those areas. Light sand with 220, dust off or better yet wipe with tack rag. Apply finish coat(s).

That bowl was perfect right up until that last cut...
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post #6 of 6 Old 04-22-2011, 07:13 PM
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Used to paint for a living....
Clean the cabinets first using a mix of warm water and vinegar to de-grease them. Then sand, 150-180-220 to just scuff up the finish. Prime with a good stain sealing primer (oil based or shellac based) to prevent the stain from bleeding through the paint. Fix any dings and re-prime those areas. Light sand with 220, dust off or better yet wipe with tack rag. Apply finish coat(s).
+1. Except I would use mineral spirits to clean and degrease. I would use a dry tack cloth like this. Ordinary tack cloths can leave a resinous residue. You could just blow them off in another area from where you will be finishing.

Use a good oil base primer, and a white oil base enamel. Don't paint the insides. Use a good brush like a badger hair. Very smooth rollers (1/4" nap) work well on flat areas.








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