Quick and easy bench mortises - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 6 Old 08-01-2020, 08:47 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
allpurpose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 1,662
View allpurpose's Photo Album My Photos
Quick and easy bench mortises

I've chopped a lot of mortises into 2x4s for work benches and such and I don't have to tell anyone how time consuming it can be not to mention how easy it is to go down into it crooked, but I was watching a Colin Keneck(?) video on the uses of the multitool in the shop and one use he kind of hinted about was cutting mortises so I dug out the old multitool to give it a try. I am blown away by how easy it is to quickly cut down and nice and straight into a mortise with one. It takes a bit of practice, but I found I can go down about an inch (with an old dull blade), stop and clear the waste and continue down without losing the proper angle.
Last night I was chopping a mortise and we've had a boat load of rain recently so the wood is acting much like a sponge making it difficult to get nice clean cuts even with a sharp chisel. I tried the multitool and PHEW! Right on down and straight and clearing the waste away is a breeze.

The one on the right is nice and sloppy and took hours not to mention blowing out the other side..
The one on the left took about a minute and I can't tell the difference between it and a nice clean cut with nice dry lumber and a nice sharp chisel.
Give it a try with some scrap and see what you think. I don't know if I would do it with expensive hardwood on anything that has to be seen everyday, but for a workbench in the shop? It's minutes of work vs hours upon hours..

I figured it's time to change my signature so hold your breath. This is it.
Impressive, huh?
Marty or Marty Farty if you feel mean.
allpurpose is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 6 Old 08-01-2020, 09:34 AM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,552
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
For more precise mortises ......

Nothing wrong with the mulit-tool approach for rough work, but for more precise mortises, I use a self centering router jig:
https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/memb...on-quilt-rack/

Mine uses a parallelogram design to center the bit on the stock. I can't remember exactly how I made it at this point, but it's quite simple and adjustable for width.



There's a bunch of these on You Tube, this is one of the better ones I found, but it's not self-centering although it allows for more variations in routing positions:


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
post #3 of 6 Old 08-01-2020, 09:59 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
allpurpose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 1,662
View allpurpose's Photo Album My Photos
Edit..I found a huge mistake I made of not drilling a straight pilot hole or holes so the blade meets in the middle which is the same problem I often get just pounding down with just a chisel. I ended up with two nice straight lines that don't meet straight with two big ledges on opposite sides.. Maybe I need to rethink this and figure out a way to keep the blade going straight down. Pilots on the drill press perhaps ? I've never liked chiseling out drilled holes, but maybe I'll revisit that..lol

I figured it's time to change my signature so hold your breath. This is it.
Impressive, huh?
Marty or Marty Farty if you feel mean.
allpurpose is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 6 Old 08-01-2020, 10:12 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
allpurpose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 1,662
View allpurpose's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Nothing wrong with the mulit-tool approach for rough work, but for more precise mortises, I use a self centering router jig:
https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/memb...on-quilt-rack/

Mine uses a parallelogram design to center the bit on the stock. I can't remember exactly how I made it at this point, but it's quite simple and adjustable for width.



There's a bunch of these on You Tube, this is one of the better ones I found, but it's not self-centering although it allows for more variations in routing positions:

Woodworking : Mortising Jig - Router Jig - Tenoning Jig - Dado Jig - YouTube
I tried to get the mortising router thing down awhile back and failed so I had given up on it, but that was a good while back and I was trying to get by with much too thin of materials so there was way too much flex so nothing was ever straight. Now I have plenty of thicker hardwood sitting around since I found a much better source than box store hardwood. I really need to revisit this as well.
I like using chisels, but holy mother of everything hot it's like an oven in my shop and pounding on chisels in 98° with super high humidity is NOT my idea of a good time..lol

Anyways..I still think the multitool might work, but not for going 3 1/2" across a 2x4..perhaps the other direction.. The blade flexed just too much and I couldn't control where it went that far down.

What can I tell you..I get all excited when I think something is going to work, but it's usually doomed from the start and I find out the hard way.. lol I've been like this all my life..

I figured it's time to change my signature so hold your breath. This is it.
Impressive, huh?
Marty or Marty Farty if you feel mean.

Last edited by allpurpose; 08-01-2020 at 10:16 AM.
allpurpose is offline  
post #5 of 6 Old 08-01-2020, 10:55 AM
Senior Member
 
furnacefighter15's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Batavia IL (West Chicago Burb)
Posts: 262
View furnacefighter15's Photo Album My Photos
I built a small barn at my last house using mortise and tenons. All hand cut. Im far from expert on the subject, but I spent a summer doing it, so got pretty good at it.

With hand work on through tennons, I found that working from both sides is the best appoach.

Do your layout on both sides refferencing the same face for the layout.

Drill a hole on each end of the mortise 1/2 way through, if the mortise is larger, drill a 3rd or forth hole as need to hog out in between the 2 side holes.

Flip the work and repeat. The key is to keep the drill as true as possible while drilling.

Then clean up with the chissel, or in this case the multi-tool.

I did the drilling with a bit brace and forsner type bit with a threaded feed screw tip, so keeping square was easy since you can just stop and change the bit brace angle if needed.

If you need to make a bunch quickly, look into a mortising chain saw. Thats how many of the heavy timber work is done now days.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

Dave H
furnacefighter15 is offline  
post #6 of 6 Old 08-03-2020, 08:39 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: CT
Posts: 15
View jpl500's Photo Album My Photos
I use the referencing guide as shown here:
. Once you make a few to standard widths for mortises, I just pull one off the shelf and use it, referencing off the same face like ff15 said. It makes for nice straight mortises everytime.
jpl500 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome