Question Re: ZCI for circular saw - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 10 Old 01-23-2013, 11:35 AM Thread Starter
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Question Re: ZCI for circular saw

So I found an awesome guide that I'd like to try out.

I just have a quick question. How exactly is the routing being done in this picture?

http://woodworking.phruksawan.com/zc...cutAndRout.jpg

Never used a router before, I know it needs a straight bit, but outside of that, I have no idea how he got such a nice route job on that. Obviously you need to ride the router against something...do you just ride it along a piece of wood you clamp to the project?
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post #2 of 10 Old 01-23-2013, 11:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gannicus View Post
I just have a quick question. How exactly is the routing being done in this picture?

Never used a router before, I know it needs a straight bit, but outside of that, I have no idea how he got such a nice route job on that. Obviously you need to ride the router against something...do you just ride it along a piece of wood you clamp to the project?
There are many different shapes of router bits.

There are also different types of straight router bit. One type is meant to trim the edge of something. The cutter dimensions may not overlap so if you were to lower the bit it would not cut in the middle.
The other type has cutters whose dimensions do overlap, so this type can be used for trimming an edge AND for plunging into the wood to start the cut.

Routing the slot in the picture would normally be done with a plunge cut style of straight bit.

The picture does not show the method to control the shape of the cut. For the router in the picture, this would be a guide with a cutout for the OUTSIDE of the router base, so a big piece.

Some router bit have a guide bushing AT THE TOP and then the template will be smaller and the hole will match the dimensions of the hole being routed. You just need the bearing to ride against the template.

Here is an example. These bits will give a relatively large radius in the corner.
http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/pag...435,46171&ap=1

Another method is to insert a guide bushing into the baseplate of the router and use a smaller diameter bit. Just takes more passes to clean out the wood and do not apply heavy pressure. The small 1/8in diameter router bit is easily broken. Been there, did that.

http://www.woodcraft.com/product/200...r-bit-set.aspx
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post #3 of 10 Old 01-23-2013, 12:01 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Dave Paine View Post
There are many different shapes of router bits.

There are also different types of straight router bit. One type is meant to trim the edge of something. The cutter dimensions may not overlap so if you were to lower the bit it would not cut in the middle.
The other type has cutters whose dimensions do overlap, so this type can be used for trimming an edge AND for plunging into the wood to start the cut.

Routing the slot in the picture would normally be done with a plunge cut style of straight bit.

The picture does not show the method to control the shape of the cut. For the router in the picture, this would be a guide with a cutout for the OUTSIDE of the router base, so a big piece.

Some router bit have a guide bushing AT THE TOP and then the template will be smaller and the hole will match the dimensions of the hole being routed. You just need the bearing to ride against the template.

Here is an example. These bits will give a relatively large radius in the corner.
http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/pag...435,46171&ap=1

Another method is to insert a guide bushing into the baseplate of the router and use a smaller diameter bit. Just takes more passes to clean out the wood and do not apply heavy pressure. The small 1/8in diameter router bit is easily broken. Been there, did that.

http://www.woodcraft.com/product/200...r-bit-set.aspx
Yeah, I guess I just don't understand how any of this stuff works is my issue. The router the guy uses in the tutorial isn't a plunge style router either.
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post #4 of 10 Old 01-23-2013, 12:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Gannicus View Post
Yeah, I guess I just don't understand how any of this stuff works is my issue. The router the guy uses in the tutorial isn't a plunge style router either.
If you have that little experience your in need of classes or someone to teach you. look for classes at a woodcraft or other similar place or try and find someone with a shop that will teach you. You can get lots of help on here but it's better if someone can observe if your doing things correctly and more important if your doing things safely.
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post #5 of 10 Old 01-23-2013, 12:22 PM Thread Starter
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If you have that little experience your in need of classes or someone to teach you. look for classes at a woodcraft or other similar place or try and find someone with a shop that will teach you. You can get lots of help on here but it's better if someone can observe if your doing things correctly and more important if your doing things safely.
Totally agree, I've been looking, but there doesn't seem to be anything in my area for woodshop classes.
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post #6 of 10 Old 01-23-2013, 12:25 PM
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I tell people this all the time. You have no location listed in your profile. There may be a fellow WWT member around the corner. So where are you located and get it listed in your profile. City and State is all you need.
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post #7 of 10 Old 01-23-2013, 01:05 PM
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Like Dave pointed out, the picture leaves only a couple of clues as to how he guided the routing.
You would be able to do it with a fixed base router by drilling starting holes in at least one corner of the rectangular through cut. From that, you could just change the depth to create the relief at the top and upper left edge. The bit does not appear to have a top bearing and the bit is pretty long for that operation anyway. The router is not set up to accept guide bushings. Given that, I would conclude that he used guides to run against the edge of the base, or used a router edge guide.
There are a lot of different ways to do that, none terribly obvious if you have never used a router. If you have a friend or acqaintance that is into woodworking you may show them the picture and get a better explanation. It may be easier and more expeditious to make one from plain MDF, without the plastic insert, at this point.
Good Luck

John

If I strive for perfection, I can generally achieve good'nuff, If I strive for good'nuff, I generally achieve firewood
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post #8 of 10 Old 01-23-2013, 04:37 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by jschaben View Post
Like Dave pointed out, the picture leaves only a couple of clues as to how he guided the routing.
You would be able to do it with a fixed base router by drilling starting holes in at least one corner of the rectangular through cut. From that, you could just change the depth to create the relief at the top and upper left edge. The bit does not appear to have a top bearing and the bit is pretty long for that operation anyway. The router is not set up to accept guide bushings. Given that, I would conclude that he used guides to run against the edge of the base, or used a router edge guide.
There are a lot of different ways to do that, none terribly obvious if you have never used a router. If you have a friend or acqaintance that is into woodworking you may show them the picture and get a better explanation. It may be easier and more expeditious to make one from plain MDF, without the plastic insert, at this point.
Good Luck
John, I did! I asked a co-worker of mine who on occasion is known to build things, and he explained it to me. Basically he just made a frame around where he wanted the indent.

So if we were looking to have a 2 x 2 square, you make a square around where you want to route that is the width of your router base + the size of the square, in this case 2, minus the bit size. Using a 1/2 bit as an example, and saying that the base of your router is six inches across, you'd need to make a 7 1/2" x 7 1/2" square "jig". Place the router inside of that frame, and go to town. The resulting square inside that is routed would be 2 x 2. The corners would need to be cleaned out if you were looking for a perfect 90 degree corners...but...hopefully that's of use to someone.
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post #9 of 10 Old 01-23-2013, 05:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Gannicus View Post
John, I did! I asked a co-worker of mine who on occasion is known to build things, and he explained it to me. Basically he just made a frame around where he wanted the indent.

So if we were looking to have a 2 x 2 square, you make a square around where you want to route that is the width of your router base + the size of the square, in this case 2, minus the bit size. Using a 1/2 bit as an example, and saying that the base of your router is six inches across, you'd need to make a 7 1/2" x 7 1/2" square "jig". Place the router inside of that frame, and go to town. The resulting square inside that is routed would be 2 x 2. The corners would need to be cleaned out if you were looking for a perfect 90 degree corners...but...hopefully that's of use to someone.

Great, so, now when are you getting your own router?
The things are amazingly flexible, not to mention somewhat addictive.

John

If I strive for perfection, I can generally achieve good'nuff, If I strive for good'nuff, I generally achieve firewood
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post #10 of 10 Old 01-24-2013, 10:02 AM Thread Starter
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Great, so, now when are you getting your own router?
The things are amazingly flexible, not to mention somewhat addictive.
Already got one.
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