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post #1 of 21 Old 07-22-2015, 10:59 AM Thread Starter
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Quality Woods

So I am new to this site and actually seeked out a woodworking site for this question. I do a lot of wood working projects and am tired of doing them with lumber from Home Depot. It seems like whatever I do to make projects look professional, the cuts/warps/splits/knots/etc of the wood from HD and Lowes makes it impossible.

I live in the Tampa Bay area and would love some advice on where to go to get lumber that doesn't suck. I am a novice wood worker and do understand that part of my issue is in fact my own limitations. I also understand that with that being the case, I need all the help I can get from good wood that is cut straight! ha

I look forward to hearing from you guys and also getting to know you and being on the forum. Wood working is a passion of mine and there is not a weekend that goes by without wood and saws being a part of it.

Any responses would be great, and as a new member and an amateur builder, I would also love if anyone would post some great threads to check out for my pleasure and learning!

Thanks guys!
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post #2 of 21 Old 07-22-2015, 01:07 PM
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Welcome to the site. If you can afford it, get a jointer and planer and buy rough lumber. I did my first few projects with Lowes lumber. I quickly realized I would end up saving money by milling down rough lumber. I think these have been my best woodworking investments so far.
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post #3 of 21 Old 07-22-2015, 01:16 PM
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I agree with CPS; a jointer & planer gives you the capability of buying rough lumber (less expensive!), and will allow you to repurpose previously used hardwood. I've scrounged old furniture at the curb during the local "cleanup week", and recently cleaned up a bunch of oak & walnut from a piano that we needed to get rid of.

In the absence of those machines, however, I'd suggest checking out any & all lumberyards that are close enough to you. We have a couple nearby that appear to be home building & construction oriented, yet they have oak, maple, and mahogany available, all finished to thickness & width.

I'm fortunate to have a huge place about 30 minutes away that has every kind of hardwood that I could ever imagine using, & then some. It's rough, but for a little extra $$, they'll finish it for you.

Good luck & have fun!
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post #4 of 21 Old 07-22-2015, 01:55 PM
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Material selection and prep can be a good portion of a projects time. Don't be quick to pick up what ever lumber is there in front of you. Besides lumber can be expensive so be choosy and get what you think will be appropriate for your project. Good luck and if you do woodworking every weekend you are not considered a novice on my book.
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post #5 of 21 Old 07-22-2015, 02:11 PM Thread Starter
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I have considered the jointer and planer option but do not know enough about them to really invest. I would hate to spend money on one that is going to not produce the level of quality I am looking for. That would be horrible. In addition, I am somewhat limited on space.

Any suggestions on a jointer that is a good place to start my research? I think that is the most important part to me and then a planer would be the next investment. I would assume there are some combo units that might make the most sense.

I am the wood worker who "figures things out" as opposed to the one who does things systematically and the way that has been proven most effective by time. This only gets you so far and I am now to the point where I want my hobby to become a little bit more professional. Really want to walk away from projects thinking I am completely happy with that result instead of surprised and either over or under impressed!

Thanks again,
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post #6 of 21 Old 07-22-2015, 03:29 PM
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I also will avoid using wood from "big box" outlets, primarily due to problems I have had in the past with inconsistent moisture content in the wood. So I found a local cabinet making shop and stopped by there one day years ago and started talking with the owner/operator about needing quality wood, etc, and short story...I have bought 90% of all of the furniture wood I have used in the last 15 years there.

The quality is excellent, his prices are good too and I often will take pieces back to him to have him run them through his wide belt sander. I pay him for his time on this, but the perfectly sanded pieces in no time are well worth it.

If I were you...I would try to find a local cabinet maker and make friends with him.
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post #7 of 21 Old 07-22-2015, 08:26 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks, thats a good tape^^

Any input on where to start with a planer/jointer machinery, guys? I am looking and see some around $4-800 but many that are 2-3000. What are the large differences and which get the job done?

Thanks in advance!
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post #8 of 21 Old 07-22-2015, 08:50 PM
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lumber mills florida - Google Search

I was surprised to find sawmills in your area----these might be worth a day trip---

Some mills will surface your wood for a small fee---most mills also have some odd and special wood available--

A surface planer will be something you will be glad to own---I feel like I waste money when I have to buy wood from my supply house---the mills offer some super prices and a selection from common to FAS---
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post #9 of 21 Old 07-22-2015, 09:00 PM
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Most folks start with a 12 or 13 inch surface planer---I have a DeWalt---and have been very pleased with it----I would like to move up to a heavy duty 20 inch one--that would be better for some of the door panels I glue up--

If you are just setting up your shop---consider used euipment--if the price is right and parts are still available---the surface planer will make a huge change in your ability to design things---
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post #10 of 21 Old 07-22-2015, 10:51 PM
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Craigs list or tempest search is your friend.
I picked up most of what I have there for a fraction of new prices .
You have to patient to find the deals.
I traded labor for a large amount of kiln dried wood.
I really don't have a lot of money wrapped up in this hobby ....Yet !
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post #11 of 21 Old 07-23-2015, 02:50 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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OK, I'm confused ....

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeswoods View Post
Most folks start with a 12 or 13 inch surface planer---I have a DeWalt---and have been very pleased with it----I would like to move up to a heavy duty 20 inch one--that would be better for some of the door panels I glue up--

If you are just setting up your shop---consider used euipment--if the price is right and parts are still available---the surface planer will make a huge change in your ability to design things---
You've got me scratching my head.
A jointer planes the board's bottom surface and makes it flat.... there is no "planer" in the the word jointer although it does plane or remove material.

A "thickness planer" removes material from the top of the board that has been previously flattened by the jointer making both surfaces a uniform thickness and parallel. Folks always drop the word "thickness" when describing this machine, but it is an important part of the terminology.

I don't know what a surface planer is.... unless it's a hand plane?

I am a stickler for using the proper terms in the discussion, especially for a beginner who may be confused by the slight differences in terminology and who may not know the distinction.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #12 of 21 Old 07-23-2015, 08:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bryanp View Post
Thanks, thats a good tape^^

Any input on where to start with a planer/jointer machinery, guys? I am looking and see some around $4-800 but many that are 2-3000. What are the large differences and which get the job done?

Thanks in advance!
I started building up my tools about 5 years ago and looking back I 100% think you should start with a planer first instead of a jointer. For table top type planers the dewalt is consistently rated as the one to get (2 speed one) and I think new is like $500. You can build a sled to use in your planer so it acts like a jointer too.

I have a jointer now but used this method for like 3 yrs.. it is easier/faster but quality wise I see no difference in the output.
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post #13 of 21 Old 07-23-2015, 02:42 PM Thread Starter
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post #14 of 21 Old 07-23-2015, 05:17 PM
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Yup...that's the one. People on this forum and others recommend it.
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post #15 of 21 Old 07-23-2015, 05:32 PM
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I have the same planer.....so far, so good.
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post #16 of 21 Old 07-23-2015, 05:44 PM Thread Starter
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So can someone help me really understand the difference between the two machines? I have read it and understand it kinda but dont really understand completely. This is what I have in my mind.

Planner - Wood runs under a blade that cuts it down in thickness

Jointer - Wood runs next to it more like a table saw and it flattens down the width?

I am just trying to figure out how this can make a board straighter and remove a warp? If the board is warped up vertically to where it does not lay flat, how does this remove the concavity? wouldn't it just make the boards smoother but not necessarily "square" so to say.

Thanks guys, this is super helpful. Really encouraged by some of the work on this board and want to start doing projects I can be really proud of. This kind of feed back is much appreciated.
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post #17 of 21 Old 07-23-2015, 06:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bryanp View Post
So can someone help me really understand the difference between the two machines? I have read it and understand it kinda but dont really understand completely. This is what I have in my mind.

Planner - Wood runs under a blade that cuts it down in thickness

Jointer - Wood runs next to it more like a table saw and it flattens down the width?

I am just trying to figure out how this can make a board straighter and remove a warp? If the board is warped up vertically to where it does not lay flat, how does this remove the concavity? wouldn't it just make the boards smoother but not necessarily "square" so to say.

Thanks guys, this is super helpful. Really encouraged by some of the work on this board and want to start doing projects I can be really proud of. This kind of feed back is much appreciated.
This explains the jointer aspect:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqqa6W8m6Y8

edit: even better...Kenbo:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3tUhWbd4rck
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post #18 of 21 Old 07-23-2015, 06:28 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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did you not understand this?

Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
You've got me scratching my head.
A jointer planes the board's bottom surface and makes it flat....

A "thickness planer" removes material from the top of the board that has been previously flattened by the jointer making both surfaces a uniform thickness and parallel. Folks always drop the word "thickness" when describing this machine, but it is an important part of the terminology.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bryanp View Post
in my mind.

Planner - Wood runs under a blade that cuts it down in thickness

Jointer - Wood runs next to it more like a table saw and it flattens down the width?

I am just trying to figure out how this can make a board straighter and remove a warp? If the board is warped up vertically to where it does not lay flat, how does this remove the concavity? wouldn't it just make the boards smoother but not necessarily "square" so to say.
A jointer can straighten an edge OR a surface. If you hold the board with the edge up it will straighten the edge on the table. If you place the board "flat" on the table it will straighten/flatten that surface.

Then you place that flat surface on the bed of your thickness planer and it will make the top surface a uniform thickness relative to the bottom....

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 07-23-2015 at 07:41 PM.
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post #19 of 21 Old 07-23-2015, 06:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bryanp View Post
So I am new to this site and actually seeked out a woodworking site for this question. I do a lot of wood working projects and am tired of doing them with lumber from Home Depot. It seems like whatever I do to make projects look professional, the cuts/warps/splits/knots/etc of the wood from HD and Lowes makes it impossible.



I live in the Tampa Bay area and would love some advice on where to go to get lumber that doesn't suck. I am a novice wood worker and do understand that part of my issue is in fact my own limitations. I also understand that with that being the case, I need all the help I can get from good wood that is cut straight! ha



I look forward to hearing from you guys and also getting to know you and being on the forum. Wood working is a passion of mine and there is not a weekend that goes by without wood and saws being a part of it.



Any responses would be great, and as a new member and an amateur builder, I would also love if anyone would post some great threads to check out for my pleasure and learning!



Thanks guys!

Lucky you. Lakeland Fl has a really good size lumber co. I forget the name but you'll find it in a Google search. Big boards and good prices.

Al


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post #20 of 21 Old 07-23-2015, 08:39 PM Thread Starter
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Awesome, you guys are great. Thanks for giving me some answers and taking 10 seconds to respond. I have a lot of hobbies that if you aren't the top dog on the forum, you don't get answers. I can see the brotherhood in just my first couple posts and an interest in seeing the new guys get better.

Can't wait to get into this forum and start producing some things that I can post on here and really be happy with. Just so I am not all talk, here is a couple things I am working on. I just finished this pantry and I am working on this bed. [IMG] [IMG][/IMG][/IMG]
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