Quality screws for white oak - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 34 Old 11-30-2019, 10:45 AM
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Yes, good quality screws are a must. I use GRK but also use Spax quite a bit. No doubt the GRK is a better quality screw.



Be sure its a tapered drill and overdrill about 1/8". Also, be sure the hold in the board being attached is large enough to allow the screw to spin freely or else the resulting gap will cause an issue.
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Last edited by DrRobert; 11-30-2019 at 10:48 AM.
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post #22 of 34 Old 11-30-2019, 10:56 AM
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Couple thoughts:

Like everything else these days there are those products on the shelves that are not worth bring home, unfortunately many screws fall into that category. Two things happen with crappy screws if they do not have proper pilot holes, they break or the head strips before the screw is set. Square drive coated screws are best driven with a bit specially designed to be used with them.

Another problem is that the driver bits also very in quality, a worn out driver bit in a high powered drill or impact will often strip out the head if there is too much resistance.

Drywall screws are for installing drywall, nothing else as tempting as it may be.

Moral of the story, buy quality and learn the proper technique.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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Last edited by FrankC; 11-30-2019 at 10:58 AM.
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post #23 of 34 Old 12-01-2019, 12:14 PM
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This is the screw chart I use.
I use bees wax on my screws... I rub onto the threads and roll the wax into the screw threads between my finger and thumb prior to screwing into a pilot hole.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf screwchart.pdf (27.6 KB, 29 views)
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post #24 of 34 Old 12-02-2019, 08:52 AM
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Thanks for the screw chart, that’s handy. I’ve printed it and will hang it in the shop.
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post #25 of 34 Old Yesterday, 11:03 PM
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Liquid dish soap will also work.
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post #26 of 34 Old Yesterday, 11:15 PM
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As far as working with brass screws go I simply use a steel screw of the same size first, being careful to predrill and using wax. I screw it in with a hand screwdriver. Then I remove the steel screw and replace it with a brass one. By using a screwdriver instead of a driver-drill I get a better feel for how much torque it's taking to turn the screw. BTW: slotted screws don't came-out as much as Phillip's head screws.
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post #27 of 34 Old Today, 12:17 AM
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Just a quick note about pre-threading with steel screws. Make sure the threads of the steel screws are the same as the threads on the brass screws. Using the steel screws is like threading a hole in metal with a tap.

Rich
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post #28 of 34 Old Today, 01:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
Drywall screws are for installing drywall, nothing else as tempting as it may be.
Really, how come.?
I am not a carpenter or furniture builder, but i have used self-tapping "Drywall" screws in Birch, Maple, Oak and Dogwood. They always worked fine.
So called "Drywall Screws" could be driven into 101 different things that might be behind the rock.
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post #29 of 34 Old Today, 02:21 AM
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The drywall screws are treated to prevent corrosion. This treating makes them weak. And if you think about it, it is so easy to "pop" a drywall screw through the wall board. However if using a drywall screw to pull two pieces wood together, you'll more than likely snap the screw.

Rich
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post #30 of 34 Old Today, 02:25 AM Thread Starter
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For me drywall screws on white oak have been a disaster. Even with oversize drill in the pilot holes, I learned my lesson. I went and bought some spax screws because they were made in the USA. I ran a couple into White Oak with no pilot hole with no breakage. Looks like I found a new supply screws made in the USA.
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post #31 of 34 Old Today, 02:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jorma View Post
Really, how come.?
I am not a carpenter or furniture builder, but i have used self-tapping "Drywall" screws in Birch, Maple, Oak and Dogwood. They always worked fine.
So called "Drywall Screws" could be driven into 101 different things that might be behind the rock.
Drywall screws are brittle and offer very little shear strength so they are not recommended for general use.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #32 of 34 Old Today, 04:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
Drywall screws are brittle and offer very little shear strength so they are not recommended for general use.
Wow. I had no idea.
Then again, are all of those black screws a "Drywall Screw" .?


I do not think i have ever broken the head off of one of those screws, with a battery drill, going into hard woods, with no pilot hole.



I have seen countless carpenters hang uppers, with those screws for 30 years.
Those Ply or MDF cabinets are heavy.


I have a set of uppers that have been in my garage for 20 years.

They are HEAVY, with P-Lam outsides and melamine on the inside. All of the cleats that the cabs hang on are screwed in with just a few drywall screws.


Why are those screws so brittle.?
Thank You

Last edited by jorma; Today at 04:40 AM.
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post #33 of 34 Old Today, 05:18 AM
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No, not all black screws are drywall screws, only those labelled as such, flooring and trim screws come immediately to mind as other types.

A new house in some jurisdictions with upper cabinets fastened with drywall screws will not pass inspection.

As for brittle, read post #29.

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post #34 of 34 Old Today, 06:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
No, not all black screws are drywall screws, only those labelled as such, flooring and trim screws come immediately to mind as other types.

A new house in some jurisdictions with upper cabinets fastened with drywall screws will not pass inspection.

As for brittle, read post #29.
I see... thank you.
Obviously then, what i saw for 30 years in San Francisco was the use of a much better screw than a "Drywall Screw".....it was also used for drywall, just to avoid the hassle of stocking two different screws, and also to avoid the mistake of what you guys have been describing.


Thanks Again
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