Purpleheart wood strength??? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 12 Old 01-01-2011, 02:06 PM Thread Starter
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post #2 of 12 Old 01-01-2011, 02:08 PM Thread Starter
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post #3 of 12 Old 01-01-2011, 02:55 PM
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If I were to make it, I would have put the drill hole and lead fill in from the end and not across the grain.
I am not familiar with night sticks and batons....are the ones you made in proportion to the ones that someone would buy off the shelf?
Also note the symbol ' is for a measurement in feet. Inches are shown as "

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post #4 of 12 Old 01-01-2011, 05:05 PM Thread Starter
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post #5 of 12 Old 01-01-2011, 05:27 PM
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I am surprised they failed especially if you are using similar proportions. Have you tried ash yet? That is what baseball bats are made of. Maybe strength alone is not enough. They also need to be able to handle shock. What are traditional clubs made of?

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post #6 of 12 Old 01-01-2011, 05:35 PM
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My experience w/ purpleheart is that it is a very tough, dense wood, but somewhat brittle, which would agree w/ your experience of it splitting.

I think you're much better of with hickory or, as Tony suggested, ash.

I AM surprised that the oak split thought ... maybe you ARE too strong.

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post #7 of 12 Old 01-01-2011, 05:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony B View Post
I am surprised they failed especially if you are using similar proportions. Have you tried ash yet? That is what baseball bats are made of. Maybe strength alone is not enough. They also need to be able to handle shock. What are traditional clubs made of?
The other wood to try along with ash would be hickory. Tough as nails. Keep in mind if you take a baseball bat and orient the grain improperly and hit it on the concrete, it will shatter too. Concrete has no give to it. If these are being made with the intention of hitting somebody's head, I doubt they will break before the poor fellow's head.
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post #8 of 12 Old 01-01-2011, 05:55 PM Thread Starter
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post #9 of 12 Old 01-01-2011, 07:49 PM
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The ones I've seen are made from cedar and are cored from the end of the shaft as mentioned above. I think they were called Tire Thumpers.
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post #10 of 12 Old 01-01-2011, 08:00 PM Thread Starter
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there all over ebay for $20............plain looking
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post #11 of 12 Old 01-02-2011, 01:42 AM
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I agree with all above, shock resistance is more important that strength. I also +1 grain orientation. Hammers are this way too, you should buy one with the grain running the same direction as the head. A lot of those fancy woods are hard as rock but brittle as ice. They are very beautiful clubs though.
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post #12 of 12 Old 01-02-2011, 03:42 AM
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I can't really speak to the inherent strength of the wood, and others have done a good job anyway.

What I can say is that you significantly reduced the strength of the wood by drilling those holes across the grain, as demonstrated by the way the clubs shattered! I'd be willing to bet a red soda water that even if you made the clubs of ash or hickory and drilled & filled laterally drilled holes like you've been doing, they'd shatter just like the other ones.

By drilling across the grain, you've essentially broken the club already. When you slam it against the concrete, the lead, which has significantly more momentum than the wood, applies a shearing force perpendicular to the cut grain of the wood and it simply rips the wood apart. It's like holding the stick horizontally on a cement block with one end hanging off and hitting that end with a 10 pound sledge.

By drilling the hole longitudinally, when you slam the stick against the concrete, the lead fill is supported by the wood on all sides and you don't get the same shearing force. It would be more like hitting the part of the club resting on the cement block. You'll deform the wood, but it probably won't shatter the same way as long as there are no voids in the wood (that is, make sure you fill the hole completely!)

(By way of speculation, I'll bet if you slammed the club against the concrete hard enough and enough times, the lead would compress the wood around it enough for the fill to become loose inside the club... I've got no way of knowing for sure, but it seems to make sense...)

Just my three cents (inflation...)

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