Problems first time making raise panels on table saw - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 15 Old 06-04-2015, 03:05 PM Thread Starter
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Problems first time making raise panels on table saw

So i made my firsy attempt at raised panel doors on my table using a 10" Diablo 60t combination blade. First i made my 1/8 deep cuts along the face of the board then went on to cut the angled cuts. The 2 long cuts, with the grain, went fine. But when i went to make the top and bottom cuts they smoked like nothing ive seen before. Could anyone have any idea what i was doing wrong. Panel was fairly small, 5"x12" and the blade was not brand new but it cuts fairly well on normal rip cuts and cross cuts. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
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post #2 of 15 Old 06-04-2015, 03:33 PM
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Was it across grain or with the grain you were attempting to cut??

The tools don't make the craftsman....
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post #3 of 15 Old 06-04-2015, 03:41 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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clean the blade

Start with a clean blade. Use Simple Green, in the professional grade ..... Purple if possible. Or Paint thinner to dissolve the gum. A pie pan or other round flat container works best.

What's the depth of cut... probably around 2"? That's a difficult cut to make because it's deep and there is no place for the dust to escape..... like a rip, so it gets hot and smokes. Make 2 shallow passes to get to your full depth.

Freud does not make a 60 tooth combination blade... as far as I know. They do make a 50 tooth combination however, and that should work fine.

I'm guessing the wood is Cherry? which tends to burn more easily. Make certain your fence is tall enough to keep the panel vertical and stable. Use a tall fence jig if needed. Most stock fences are not tall enough to keep a panel perfectly vertical. It's a worthwhile jig to have in your stable, and it helps to keep your work "stable".....


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #4 of 15 Old 06-04-2015, 03:41 PM
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IF technique is correct and blade is a combo blade (for crosscutting), then the only thing left is blade height.
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post #5 of 15 Old 06-04-2015, 04:20 PM
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You didn't mention if you're using a tall fence jig. I've tried raising panels on the table saw and was never able to keep the panel perfectly vertical enough on my stock fence. I think you might succeed with the tall fence jig, but I ended up buying a panel raising bit for the router table. It takes a lot of passes and it's a little scary, but the result is much better than I was getting with the table saw.
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post #6 of 15 Old 06-04-2015, 04:23 PM
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Notice also that Woodnthings has the panel clamped to the jig for greater stability. Much nicer setup than I was trying..........
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post #7 of 15 Old 06-04-2015, 04:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phoenixbound View Post
IF technique is correct and blade is a combo blade (for crosscutting), then the only thing left is blade height.
+1: I would cut increments of only 1" or less with a 60 tooth combo blade for raised panels. Keep the work moving or it will burn and burns are hard to sand out.
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post #8 of 15 Old 06-04-2015, 04:36 PM
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I have done this with both oak and walnut. Do not remember what blade I used. Had no problems with either wood. I do have a "store bought" jig.

George
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post #9 of 15 Old 06-04-2015, 11:30 PM
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How many do you have to make? If you manage to make them that would be a lot of sanding to remove the saw marks. It might be worthwhile to get a panel raise router bit to make them.
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post #10 of 15 Old 06-05-2015, 08:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
How many do you have to make? If you manage to make them that would be a lot of sanding to remove the saw marks. It might be worthwhile to get a panel raise router bit to make them.
There is no reason for there to be saw marks.

George
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post #11 of 15 Old 06-05-2015, 10:19 PM
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There is no reason for there to be saw marks.

George
How can you avoid it?
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post #12 of 15 Old 06-06-2015, 07:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
How can you avoid it?
I did not know to expect a problem and had no problem. I did nothing to avoid it.

It has been a long time back, so possibly this senior memory is faulty. Could have had some minor problem that just did not register for the long term.

George
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post #13 of 15 Old 06-06-2015, 01:52 PM
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Raised panels with the table saw

Raised panels can be cut with relative ease with a table saw.
It is another way to maximize the table saw.
A good 40 tooth blade is my preference but I would rather use a 24 tooth blade over a 60 tooth because it's easy to overheat the blade.
Even with a new blade, be prepared to sand out some saw marks.
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post #14 of 15 Old 06-06-2015, 03:41 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the input. It was a 50t. I did attempt to make shallower cuts but had the same result. I was not using a tall fence because i didnt want to have to readjust my fence to make the vertical cuts since the width of the doors was only 4". I have a new blade on order and i will make a new Zero clearance insert so i dont have to clamp a guide block on top the fence and i can just keep the tall one on for all cuts
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post #15 of 15 Old 06-06-2015, 05:35 PM
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a tall fence will get in your way

The Delta Unifence has been around for decades and it has 2 positions, low and high. The low position is only about 1/2" off the table, the high is about 2 1/4" if my guess is correct.

With low position, the body of the fence is a few inches away from the blade which allows much easier access to smaller and more narrow strips with your fingers or a push stick. You can't see or get in there with a high fence and you have less control.

You can make an "L" fence which clamps to any fence to create a low fence:" From another thread I started:
The difference in performance between the two is minimal EXCEPT for this. The Unifence bar is removable and is capable of a high and low fence height. The low height, about 1/2" allows your hand/fingers to get down closer to the table, in between the blade and fence. Sounds dangerous, but it's not really in my opinion.
Narrow strips can be better managed with a push shoe or your hands and you have greater control. When the fence is tall like a Biesemeyer, you must use a push shoe to move the workpiece forward, OR use another sacrificial scrap to back against the work.
I recommend the use of a splitter to prevent the work from coming away from the fence behind the blade and causing a kickback. The most common reason for a "splitter" is to prevent the work from closing on the back of the blade when it's rotating and getting propelled back toward the operator. So, it really prevents both types of kickback. If you don't have one, get one or make one.
You can make your own "low" profile fence with 2 pieces of straight parallel edge scrap. Screw them together making a "L" which you can clamp to the Biesemeyer fence: Attached Thumbnails








The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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