Prevent wood from pulling away from my tablesaw fence when ripping? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 27 Old 06-12-2012, 11:18 PM Thread Starter
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Prevent wood from pulling away from my tablesaw fence when ripping?

So I've been working on a chessboard for my little brother. When ripping 2" wide strips of 4/4 maple and walnut, the wood pulls away from the fence by about 1/8" Before starting, I checked to make sure that the blade was parallel to both the miter tracks and the fence (FYI - the TS is a stock Ridgid 4512). I got the strips as even as possible with a router sled and then glued them up similar to a cutting board. I then cross-cut the glue-up without any of the pull-away problems I had when ripping. How do I prevent the crooked cut when ripping? This seems like a dumb question, but I'm a rookie...
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post #2 of 27 Old 06-12-2012, 11:26 PM
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Assuming that your fence is parallel to the blade, you may be pushing the board too close to the fence. Ideally, you should push right at the spot where the blade will come thru the wood. Since that's not a really good idea, try pushing with both hands applying even pressure on either side of the blade path. A small amount of extra pressure on the offcut side can also keep the board in contact with the fence.
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post #3 of 27 Old 06-12-2012, 11:43 PM
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ripping....it's a little tricky

The best results start with a very sharp blade free of gum and pitch.

The fence must be parallel to the miter slot and the blade must be parallel to the miter slot and therefore they are parallel to one another.

A feather board can be used in front of the teeth on the blade to maintain pressure against the fence.

A riving knife or splitter should be used when making rips.

A push BLOCK or SHOE is better than a push STICK.

You need to apply pressure downward and forward and in towards the fence simultaneously. A push stick will not work.

I've ripped thousands of feet of all different woods and materials over the years. The thick hard woods are the most tricky and require a blade designed for ripping for the best results. Fewer teeth like 24 or 30, are best for thicker woods since they carry the chips away better and therefore less heat is generated.

DO NOT REACH AROUND IN BACK OF THE BLADE FOR ANY REASON UNTIL THE BLADE HAS STOPPED.

bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #4 of 27 Old 06-13-2012, 12:05 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
The best results start with a very sharp blade free of gum and pitch.

The fence must be parallel to the miter slot and the blade must be parallel to the miter slot and therefore they are parallel to one another.

A feather board can be used in front of the teeth on the blade to maintain pressure against the fence.

A riving knife or splitter should be used when making rips.

A push BLOCK or SHOE is better than a push STICK.

You need to apply pressure downward and forward and in towards the fence simultaneously. A push stick will not work.

I've ripped thousands of feet of all different woods and materials over the years. The thick hard woods are the most tricky and require a blade designed for ripping for the best results. Fewer teeth like 24 or 30, are best for thicker woods since they carry the chips away better and therefore less heat is generated.

DO NOT REACH AROUND IN BACK OF THE BLADE FOR ANY REASON UNTIL THE BLADE HAS STOPPED.

bill
I was using the factory splitter and replaced the stock blade with this combo blade (which is clean and hasn't even cut 100' yet): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00020JOAA/ref=pe_175190_21431760_cs_sce_dp_1. I've been very happy with the blade, and a limited hobby budget is keeping me to the combo instead of dedicated blades. No featherboard yet. Is there some sort of jig for making straight rips in tough wood? Like I said, know problems when cross-cutting the glue-up into strips, so it seems to be an issue with the grain of the rip pulling away. The wood stays tight all the way through the blade, but somehow pulls away after. Will the thin kerf blad follow the grain more than a regular kerf?
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post #5 of 27 Old 06-13-2012, 12:39 AM
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I have used a 40 tooth Diablo for ripping with excellent results for rips in 1" thick stock and for hundreds if not a few thousand feet.
A 50 tooth thin kerf is pushing the limits especially in thick stock in my opinion. I use the 50 and 60 tooth for cross cutting only and generally for stock under 1".

So, if all else is up to par, then the blade is the culprit....again just my opinion. I have a 24 tooth thin kerf Diablo set up for ripping thicker stock and it works fine. They are not expensive around $30.00 at the Depot. That's all I can recommend. bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 06-13-2012 at 07:36 AM.
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post #6 of 27 Old 06-13-2012, 05:45 AM
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The stock should ride against the fence with no deviation. That's where your concentration should be, not looking at the blade. A 24T or 32T positive hook blade will work best. Set up a featherboard. Try raising the blade to a higher position. It may look scary, but I run my blade fairly high.





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post #7 of 27 Old 06-13-2012, 07:41 AM
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another possibility...

You must have a jointed, absolutely straight edge against the fence to start with, if not you will be making cuts which are slightly curved. bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #8 of 27 Old 06-13-2012, 08:04 AM
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I attach picture illustrating how I feed timber into the saw. Depending on size of what you are cutting you will want to have a transition to push sticks and or blocks (or maybe use them for the entire process)

Against popular, I have been known to taper the feed so that the work marginally binds as I feed it in. In other words I might have the back end of the fence measure 1mm smaller than the feed end.

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post #9 of 27 Old 06-13-2012, 08:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman
The stock should ride against the fence with no deviation. That's where your concentration should be, not looking at the blade. A 24T or 32T positive hook blade will work best. Set up a featherboard. Try raising the blade to a higher position. It may look scary, but I run my blade fairly high.




.
Definitely agree with cabinetman. Your primary focus should be on the fence. Of course as you get closer to the blade you want to make sure your fingers, push sticks etc are not going to come in contact with the blade.

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post #10 of 27 Old 06-13-2012, 03:39 PM
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You should be applying pressure with your hand to hold the piece squarely against the fence. It should not be able to pull away at all. For pieces that aren't wide enough to use your hand you should set up a featherboard.
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post #11 of 27 Old 06-13-2012, 05:15 PM
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I have a Ridgid TS2400 which is similar to your saw and had the same problem. Mine was due to the factory splitter. When you store the splitter on the on-board storage you have to twist it to fit it in (at least on the TS2400) which was slightly tweaking it. I spent some time making sure it was straight and perfectly in line with the blade and parallel with the fence and it fixed the issue.
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post #12 of 27 Old 06-13-2012, 08:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
The stock should ride against the fence with no deviation. That's where your concentration should be, not looking at the blade. A 24T or 32T positive hook blade will work best. Set up a featherboard. Try raising the blade to a higher position. It may look scary, but I run my blade fairly high.





.
"Set up a featherboard."

That is the key.

G
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post #13 of 27 Old 06-13-2012, 09:06 PM
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Not in my shop

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
"Set up a featherboard."

That is the key. G
In all my years of woodworking on the tablesaw I can't remember any time I used a featherboard.
A properly set up fence, a properly adjusted splitter, a sharp clean blade, a proper push shoe and I "let her rip".

Even with a straight line sled the edge can be maintained against the fence if you focus on it, rather than the blade.

I do use them on the router table where any deviation away from the fence will cause a blip in the profile which will have to be sanded out later. bill
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 06-13-2012 at 09:34 PM.
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post #14 of 27 Old 06-13-2012, 09:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
"Set up a featherboard."

That is the key.

G
Yes, a featherboard is almost a necessity for accurate cuts at times. It can also be a preventive measure against kickback.






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post #15 of 27 Old 06-13-2012, 11:25 PM Thread Starter
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I've been meaning to get a featherboard for a while, but haven't. I really don't know what I can do other than a featherboard or something like that; I have straight cuts when ripping plywood or cross-cutting the glue-up, but ripping the board lumber is getting me.
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post #16 of 27 Old 06-13-2012, 11:29 PM Thread Starter
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I forgot to add, the lumber I'm using is some kiln-tried stuff from a hardwood dealer, and the edge isn't jointed but is definately straighter than what I'm cutting. I even tried pre-cross-cutting the stuff down to about 20" lengths before ripping to help eliminate the effect of any bow in the wood, and it still pulled away.
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post #17 of 27 Old 06-13-2012, 11:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirpfarm
I've been meaning to get a featherboard for a while, but haven't. I really don't know what I can do other than a featherboard or something like that; I have straight cuts when ripping plywood or cross-cutting the glue-up, but ripping the board lumber is getting me.
You might like this site. 20 plans, you can make your own.

http://www.toolcrib.com/blog/2009/08...will-thank-you

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post #18 of 27 Old 06-13-2012, 11:36 PM
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it must be straight

The table saw will repeat a curve in the board even though the fence is straight, but the board is curved against the fence. A convex curve will give you exactly what you are experiencing.

Sight down the board for a curve and use a straight edge like a 48" aluminum level for reference. No light should show between the board and the edge of the level. A hand plane will remove the curve if you have no jointer. Work on either end of a convex curve or in the center on a concave curve. bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #19 of 27 Old 06-13-2012, 11:58 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
The table saw will repeat a curve in the board even though the fence is straight, but the board is curved against the fence. A convex curve will give you exactly what you are experiencing.

Sight down the board for a curve and use a straight edge like a 48" aluminum level for reference. No light should show between the board and the edge of the level. A hand plane will remove the curve if you have no jointer. Work on either end of a convex curve or in the center on a concave curve. bill
I'm confident in the straightness of the wood; it sits tight along the length of my fence without issue, and the 20" chunks also sat tight on the cast table of the TS. Once I start ripping it closes up around the back of the splitter. Once it starts pulling away like that, the gap creeps its way back up towards the blade as I keep cutting, leading to crooked rips.
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post #20 of 27 Old 06-14-2012, 12:08 AM
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Sometimes a board will close in on the blade during a rip cut as forces inside the wood are released. For this the only cure is a splitter or a riving knife to prevent the board from contacting the rear of the blade.

If Woodworking is so much fun why isn't it called WoodFUNNING?

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