pressing a Ball bearing into wood on a rolling pin - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 18 Old 08-01-2020, 04:16 PM Thread Starter
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pressing a Ball bearing into wood on a rolling pin

I have been refurbishing a kitchen rolling pin. (sentimental reasons)
The center axle and ball bearings were very rusted. 24Hrs in vinegar and some scrubbing cleaned off the rust. Petroleum Jelly was used on the two bearings as lubricant. (I read that would be a safe lube to use in the kitchen)
The main problem I'm having is getting the bearings pressed back into the wood. One side of the bearings are tapered, which should be the side that goes into the wood. (see attached image)
The bearings measure 0.757” and 0.759” at room temperature. (using digital calipers)
The two recessed areas for the bearings measure 0.698” and 0.703”.
I've tried freezing the bearings to get the to shrink some. No luck. I've been using scrap wood (to protect the rolling pin) and a hammer to try and insert the bearing.
So, Any thoughts on how I can get the bearings back into the the rolling pin? (google searches have not been a help, so far)

Matt M.
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post #2 of 18 Old 08-01-2020, 04:51 PM
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have never seen such a thing !!
can you show more photos of it ? like the handles, etc.
what happens when you wash it and water gets trapped
inside the roller? or does the water run out of the bearings.
very strange critter you have there for sure.

and - where you been for the past seven years ???

.

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post #3 of 18 Old 08-01-2020, 05:06 PM
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The recess in the rolling pin has probably swollen over the years from water when being washed. The water intrusion is evident by the rusted bearings. You could try a little bit of sanding to open the recess up enough to accept the bearings. Another option would be a length of thread rod longer than the rolling pin. Put a nut and a thick washer or multiple washers (washer must be larger diameter than the bearing) on one end, slide a bearing onto the rod from the other end so that it rests against the washer(s). Slide the rolling pin onto the rod, the second bearing, washer(s), and nut. Using 2 wrenches, tighten the nuts to press the bearings into the rolling pin slowly.
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post #4 of 18 Old 08-01-2020, 05:46 PM
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soak the rolling pin in water for a few days - it will swell.

The hole will also swell - becoming larger in ID. (yes - its counter-intuitive, we did this with steel and heat back in Engineering School)

Freezing trick only works on fine tolerances - which is not your situation.

Retired engineer-bureaucrat in Oakland, CA. Been working with wood since the 1960's.
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post #5 of 18 Old 08-01-2020, 05:56 PM
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IMHO, there's a big difference between .759 and .698 - almost a full 1/16th. I remember the expansion thing that Kiwi_Outdoors is talking about from High School Physics class. No way did I believe that the I.D. of that washer would get bigger when heated, but sure as hell it did.

My concern with the rolling pin that would concern me is that if the rolling pin does swell enough to get the bearing in, I'm wondering if the rolling pin might crack when the wood dries and shrinks back.

By the way, if I were going to all this trouble, I'd get new bearings... Sealed ones.
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post #6 of 18 Old 08-01-2020, 07:43 PM Thread Starter
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Attached are more pictures.
We had this rolling pin when I was kid, so it is 40+ years old. It's my brothers pin now, he left it here over christmas. (yes, I'm just finally getting around to it)
The brand is “Folley”. I don't think you're suppose to submerge the rolling pin in water, but you know, kids. It should only have a damp cloth type cleaning.
I like the sanding and threaded rod idea to seat the bearings. That will be my first step.
The water-swelling idea seems a bit more of a risk. My history with water and wood is: bad things happen. I'm not sure of the type of wood.
I did look at mcmaster for some bearings. It is a 0.75” outer diameter, 0.25” ID, and a width of 0.25”. What I could not find was a bearing with a tapered(?) edge on one side, like these have.
Thanks for the great feedback.
Matt M.
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post #7 of 18 Old 08-01-2020, 08:02 PM
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Matt - have you tried putting it back together without the bearings ?
it looks like the handles "might" fit securely in the roller's recess.
(just thinking out loud here).

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post #8 of 18 Old 08-01-2020, 09:21 PM
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Ditch the old ball bearings!

I would use all plastic bearings like Delrin or cutting board material. Get a cheap HDPE cutting board at the dollar store, you'll use it for other projects. A hole saw will make a slug that you can spin in a drill to sand to get the final OD. Let the wood DRY out! Them make your bearings a pres fit, trial and error with let you know when you are close. The ID hole can be what ever the rod size is. The end result will be trouble free and water proof.
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 08-01-2020 at 11:09 PM.
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post #9 of 18 Old 08-01-2020, 10:37 PM
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I would do two things.
1 ~ Use some 220 grit sandpaper to create a slight chamfer on each hole.
2 ~ Use a parallel jaw type clamp to ease the bearings into place. A Bessie or Jet clamp.

Rich
Just a dumb old paper boy from Brooklyn, NY
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post #10 of 18 Old 08-02-2020, 06:28 AM
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I have never before seen or heard of a rolling pin with bearings. Interesting.


George
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post #11 of 18 Old 08-02-2020, 06:37 AM
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just a gimmick at the time. Because the bearings could rust then design dropped.
These days bearings would be Teflon or Nylon.
Not really necessary at all in a rolling pin.
johnep
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post #12 of 18 Old 08-02-2020, 08:53 AM
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You guys are obviously not familiar with competitive pie making where speed is essential and the baker with the fastest rolling pin rules! &#x1f609;


Seriously though, I think it’s going to be a lot of work to sand enough out of the wood to make those bearings fit.

I noticed McMaster-Carr makes a bearing with a 1/4” I.D. and 11/16 O.D. It would be a much easier fit.

I agree with those who say a delrin bearing would work fine. If you want to go with delrin, I have a piece of delrin laying around and I’d be happy to have a go at making you a set of whatever O.D. you’d like.
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post #13 of 18 Old 08-02-2020, 12:04 PM
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quickstep View Post
You guys are obviously not familiar with competitive pie making where speed is essential and the baker with the fastest rolling pin rules! &#x1f609;


Seriously though, I think it’s going to be a lot of work to sand enough out of the wood to make those bearings fit.

I noticed McMaster-Carr makes a bearing with a 1/4” I.D. and 11/16 O.D. It would be a much easier fit.

I agree with those who say a delrin bearing would work fine. If you want to go with delrin, I have a piece of delrin laying around and I’d be happy to have a go at making you a set of whatever O.D. you’d like.
You mean the best tasting pie isn't important as long as you make it the fastest? I'd stick with mud pies in that case.

I figured it's time to change my signature so hold your breath. This is it.
Impressive, huh?
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post #14 of 18 Old 08-02-2020, 12:36 PM
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Marble rolling pins have ball bearings. My father-in-law bought a marble rolling pin for candy making. He also used it for regular baking, like pizza. The cooking pros on TV seem to prefer tapered "dowel" pins with no handles.
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post #15 of 18 Old 08-02-2020, 01:04 PM
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time for a reality check.
wood dries/shrinks/cracks over time.


the tapered outer ring of the original is not likely still in production. once upon a time the industry made billions of "custom" designs. those days are gone.


I'd look for a stainless steel sealed (-2RS or similar) bearing and carefully sand out the rolling pin to match.
see:
https://www.mcmaster.com/stainless-steel-bearings/


forcing a heavy press fit using all-thread and washers/nuts would be my absolute dead last choice.

the odds of splitting the rolling pin - immediately or later - using such force are very high.


if one options to "preserve the original" I'd still go with a gentle sanding to increase the pin diameter to fit the original (tapered) bearings.
didn't do the math - somebody said it's 1/16" on the diameter - that'd be 1/32" on the radius - not a herculean task....
I note also some fuzz/pebbles on the rolling pin ID - sanding off the 'loose stuff' may be enough...?
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post #16 of 18 Old 08-02-2020, 05:09 PM Thread Starter
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The portion of the handles nearest the rolling pin are 0.98”. So, a little large.
The Delrin is a good option. I like the idea of not rusting and cheap. (the center shaft is still going to rust, but that could be replaced with a stainless rod) A couple of small screws could be used to hold the delrin bearing replacement in the recessed area. Bearings are overkill. But, having said that, I went ahead with bearings. “preserve the original”
Some 60 grit sandpaper was wrapped around a flat head screwdriver tip. My right hand held the screwdriver/sandpaper and my left hand rolled the rolling pin back and forth on the tabletop. It took maybe 10 or 15 minutes of rolling on each side to get the hole diameter up to about 0.73”. The threaded rod/washer squeeze worked great. No problems there and no danger of the bearings falling out. Attached are some pictures.
Thanks for all of the help/feedback. It's nice to have a successful refurb.
Matt M.
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post #17 of 18 Old 08-02-2020, 05:31 PM
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I have a local 'restoration' shop.
he does beautiful work.
costs a bundle but he does beautiful work.

you've got your original rolling pin, with the original bearings, with the original handles -
splendid work!
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post #18 of 18 Old 08-02-2020, 07:08 PM
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Nice!
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