Please help me find an accurate circular saw - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 47 Old 11-30-2014, 07:27 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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laugh all you want James

Quote:
Originally Posted by OnealWoodworking View Post
It has to do with cutting at angles more than if a person is right handed or not.

Think about a staircase with open sides / skirtboards on the right AND left sides. One side will be very easy to cut the 45's in the skirtboards (where they meet with the risers) using a regular 'right-hand' circular saw but the other side is either going to have you reaching for your left-hand circular saw OR cutting your 45's by driving your right-hand saw backwards to make the cut.

If you are not cutting angles like I mentioned above then right-hand or left-hand makes no difference at all to most.

To suggest that they are not made for 'woodworking' is laughable at best.
Trimming out a stair case is not fine woodworking, it's trim carpentry, and done by a trim or finish carpenter not a woodworker. Your example is apples and oranges. Besides, a table saw won't fit on a stair case AFAICT. There is not a better tool than a circ saw for that purpose.

I own about 8 circular saws including the first one I bought when I was 14 years old a 8 1/4" Skil. I can't remember the last time I used one on a woodworking project to make a finish cut ... because they are just not that accurate and the table saw is the best tool.

You can use one all you want for your woodworking or trim carpentry, but I'll take the table saw each and every time. BTW, I am a advanced novice woodworker, not a carpenter, although I've framed a few additions and a few stairways and hung more Cedar siding than I ever wanted.

They make right and left handed circular saws because they work in opposite situations, and because right and left handed operators prefer one type or the other. I have both types and use the one that best fits the operation/situation.

You can use a table saw on a job site for rough or finish carpentry, but you can't use a circular saw in a woodworking shop for finish cuts and get any sort of precise results..... JMO

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 11-30-2014 at 07:34 PM.
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post #22 of 47 Old 11-30-2014, 07:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thorn495
I think I got a defective Makita 5007MG Magnesium 7-1/4-Inch Circular Saw. It was my first circular saw and I couldn't ever cut a straight line with it past a few inches. I thought it was my own error. I discovered the blade had a front to back 1/16" difference from the base plate. I would set up my straight edge guide and try to keep the plate against it, but the cuts would always end up veering off away from the guide.

Fortunately I was able to return it over 90 days to the store for a full refund. Now I'm looking for an alternative. I guess I want to stay away from Makita, but probably all companies have their lemons. I want something easy and accurate as I can get. The reviews for the Skill MAG77LT and DeWalt DWS535 have seemed promising. Any circular saws exceeded your expectations?
I have a DeWalt. The best one they make. I had the same problem until I adjusted it. Now it resides here.


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post #23 of 47 Old 11-30-2014, 07:46 PM
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Hold on guys I'm going for popcorn.

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post #24 of 47 Old 11-30-2014, 09:00 PM
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Thats nice AL. Id love to have a panel saw.
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post #25 of 47 Old 11-30-2014, 09:04 PM
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WW'ing IMO is any type of manipulation of wood as a means to an end. Framing or furniture it doesnt matter. The word carpenter to me is just another word for a wood worker.

To say that certain wood tools should only be used for XYZ sub-genre is silly.
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post #26 of 47 Old 11-30-2014, 09:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Al B Thayer
I have a DeWalt. The best one they make. I had the same problem until I adjusted it. Now it resides here. Al
When ya gonna finish the drywall? My shop even has artwork. Okay they're the Makita girl calendars but still they definitely are a work of art.

Cut it twice, measure once and it's still too short.
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post #27 of 47 Old 11-30-2014, 09:09 PM
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too difficult to rip sheets on a table saw. gotta make em managable somehow. Even that panel saw would be tricky for me, I work alone, and while I can lift a sheet of ply, its difficult. MDF is even harder. I generally lift it on some blocks and rip it right on the trailer as it lies.
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post #28 of 47 Old 11-30-2014, 09:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WarnerConstInc.
I use my ts 55 for rough carpentry work all the time, well at least cutting out sub floors and installing new sub flooring and sheeting.
I suppose but I watched a Makita CS slide off a roof we were sheathing in slow motion with nothing I could do.

I couldn't handle a Festool taking that dive. The Makita did keep going though.

Cut it twice, measure once and it's still too short.
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post #29 of 47 Old 11-30-2014, 09:28 PM
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Track saws are great. I have the Dewalt and love it when I need it. I also have a Milwaukee panel saw and love it for cutting cabinet parts.

Do one thing at a time, do it well, then move on.
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post #30 of 47 Old 11-30-2014, 09:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Trimming out a stair case is not fine woodworking, it's trim carpentry, and done by a trim or finish carpenter not a woodworker.
When I do a staircase it IS 'fine woodworking'.

Last one I recall doing took several months to do / finish and REQUIRED the tools at the shop to be able to do at all. Think about stuff like making custom Newel posts and laminating / fabricating your own handrail that has to match a goofy picture that the homeowner gave you as the stairway circles on up...
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post #31 of 47 Old 11-30-2014, 10:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OnealWoodworking View Post

When I do a staircase it IS 'fine woodworking'.

Last one I recall doing took several months to do / finish and REQUIRED the tools at the shop to be able to do at all. Think about stuff like making custom Newel posts and laminating / fabricating your own handrail that has to match a goofy picture that the homeowner gave you as the stairway circles on up...
I agree 100%. My in laws have a beautiful wood staircase, very detailed and precisely made. Maybe it doesn't have the box and tennon joints, but to make a 30 foot run of stairs made of solid wood with no imperfections, I'd say a true woodworker made it.
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post #32 of 47 Old 11-30-2014, 11:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chamfer
Thats nice AL. Id love to have a panel saw.
Let me help you build one. I can take 50% of the work out of it.

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post #33 of 47 Old 11-30-2014, 11:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unclefester

When ya gonna finish the drywall? My shop even has artwork. Okay they're the Makita girl calendars but still they definitely are a work of art.
Someone else owns the drywall. I'm not a painter either.

Just picked up the art work Wed. Haven't had a chance to hang it yet. My wife will be ticked if I look at Miss Jan. for more than the allotted month. My supplier was handing them out last week. You should see the swimsuits.

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post #34 of 47 Old 12-01-2014, 12:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bauerbach
too difficult to rip sheets on a table saw. gotta make em managable somehow. Even that panel saw would be tricky for me, I work alone, and while I can lift a sheet of ply, its difficult. MDF is even harder. I generally lift it on some blocks and rip it right on the trailer as it lies.
The panel saw has rollers. I cut finish cuts on it. No break down needed. I work alone too. The MDF gets slid on the floor and straight into the saw. The saw is next to the overhead door for good reason.


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post #35 of 47 Old 12-01-2014, 01:21 AM
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Here is a whole new angle... or monkey wrench! I can not argue that a table saw is more accurate then any skill saw!

But when you need to use a skill saw for sheet goods (or other situations), power or saw amp rating is a factor to consider. I always had problems cutting straight lines in furniture grade plywood and solid woods (hardwoods and pine). I tried different blades, guides etc. but could never achieve my desired cuts. Then I read all about power and amperage etc. That led me to purchasing a 13 amp saw. Regardless of the brand name, R or L cutting etc., that extra power or amperage was the answer to my needs. With my 13 amp saw, I now rip 3/4 furniture grade plywood very accurately. But whenever I can - I use my table saw!

Its' never hot or cold in New Hampshire... its' always seasonal.
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post #36 of 47 Old 12-01-2014, 04:16 AM
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I find my 18v Makita is one of the best I have had for accuracy in 25years in the building industry.


Dave the turning cowboy

turning wood into art

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post #37 of 47 Old 12-02-2014, 03:26 AM Thread Starter
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Smile

After looking around town I ended up with a Makita 5007F. Very basic and retro looking. I can get it to cut straight! I cut 2 pieces of wood the same sizes and when I put them on top of one another it's as if a router trimmed them together. I've been pretty happy with this saw. The only downside is that it didn't come with a case.

The wear marks around the nut on the blade came from using the other saw with it.
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post #38 of 47 Old 12-02-2014, 03:36 AM
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I am really surprised at Makita, it has always been at the top of quality in everything they built. It seems a lot of the top names have gone the lesser quality, I sure hope Makita hasn't.

I do disagree that stair building isn't fine wood working, and a lot of the stairs out there, I will agree that they aren't. I will say the high end stairs where machine manufactured handrails and parts aren't used, and tangent rail parts are used, is fine wood working. Just check out the process to make a tangent rail part and then tell me it isn't fine wood working.
http://www.thisiscarpentry.com/2011/...gent-handrail/
That is a piece of fine furniture.

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post #39 of 47 Old 12-02-2014, 04:26 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJim View Post
I am really surprised at Makita, it has always been at the top of quality in everything they built. It seems a lot of the top names have gone the lesser quality, I sure hope Makita hasn't.

I do disagree that stair building isn't fine wood working, and a lot of the stairs out there, I will agree that they aren't. I will say the high end stairs where machine manufactured handrails and parts aren't used, and tangent rail parts are used, is fine wood working. Just check out the process to make a tangent rail part and then tell me it isn't fine wood working.
http://www.thisiscarpentry.com/2011/...gent-handrail/
That is a piece of fine furniture.


I said ...." Trimming out a stair case is not fine woodworking, it's trim carpentry, and done by a trim or finish carpenter not a woodworker. Your example is apples and oranges. Besides, a table saw won't fit on a stair case AFAICT. There is not a better tool than a circ saw for that purpose."

Of course a hand built stair way is "fine woodworking"
and I didn't mean to imply it wasn't. The term was "trimming out", which does not mean a ground up fabrication in my book.

Trim carpenters or finish carpenters are different from framers, cabinetmakers are different from furniture makers, and hobby woodworking is different than crafting for the most part. Any one can lay claim to being a woodworker .... "I work with wood" ... but a fine woodworker of the type I am referring to, would be found in the Showcase pages of Fine Woodworking Magazine, whose pieces are made with veneers, handcut dovetails and mortise and tenons, inlays, marquetry, tapered legs, rail and style doors, including stairways, etc. Every carpenter is a woodworker, just not a fine woodworker. I have just about every issue of Fine Woodworking, so that's been my perspective on the subject.

There is always the debate as to whether Norm Abrams was a fine woodworker or just a guy with a big shop and a finish nailer and a studio full of helping hands when the cameras weren't running. To me it doesn't matter, since his work served to inspire others even if it wasn't always up to certain traditional standards.

Someone who shows up at a job site with a 28 oz framing hammer, a fully loaded tool belt and a circular
saw may very well be an excellent woodworker, but then again they may not have acquired those skills.
In my book fine woodworking is different than rough carpentry but I have carpenter friends who are capable of very fine woodworking. I did not mean to disparage anyone's skills.

The names Tage Frid, Sam Maloof, Gustov Stickley, David Marks, James Krenov and others less well known are listed on this American woodworker's page:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Categor...an_woodworkers

Stickley is one of my favorites:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gustav_Stickley

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by BigJim; 12-02-2014 at 07:06 PM.
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post #40 of 47 Old 12-02-2014, 03:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
I said ...." Trimming out a stair case is not fine woodworking, it's trim carpentry, and done by a trim or finish carpenter not a woodworker. Your example is apples and oranges. Besides, a table saw won't fit on a stair case AFAICT. There is not a better tool than a circ saw for that purpose."

Of course a hand built stair way is "fine woodworking"
and I didn't mean to imply it wasn't. The term was "trimming out", which does not mean a ground up fabrication in my book.

Trim carpenters or finish carpenters are different from framers, cabinetmakers are different from furniture makers, and hobby woodworking is different than crafting for the most part. Any one can lay claim to being a woodworker .... "I work with wood" ... but a fine woodworker of the type I am referring to, would be found in the Showcase pages of Fine Woodworking Magazine, whose pieces are made with veneers, handcut dovetails and mortise and tenons, inlays, marquetry, tapered legs, rail and style doors, including stairways, etc. Every carpenter is a woodworker, just not a fine woodworker. I have just about every issue of Fine Woodworking, so that's been my perspective on the subject.

There is always the debate as to whether Norm Abrams was a fine woodworker or just a guy with a big shop and a finish nailer and a studio full of helping hands when the cameras weren't running. To me it doesn't matter, since his work served to inspire others even if it wasn't always up to certain traditional standards.

Someone who shows up at a job site with a 28 oz framing hammer, a fully loaded tool belt and a circular
saw may very well be an excellent woodworker, but then again they may not have acquired those skills.
In my book fine woodworking is different than rough carpentry but I have carpenter friends who are capable of very fine woodworking. I did mean to disparage anyone's skills.

The names Tage Frid, Sam Maloof, Gustov Stickley, David Marks, James Krenov and others less well known are listed on this American woodworker's page:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Categor...an_woodworkers

Stickley is one of my favorites:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gustav_Stickley
I stand corrected, I agree.

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