Planning materials for porch floor - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 13 Old 02-09-2020, 09:55 PM Thread Starter
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Planning materials for porch floor

I’m re-flooring my front porch with 3” T&G flooring. It’s about 6’ X 16.5 feet.

I’m using kiln dried after treatment Pressure Treated flooring which has to be ordered and comes in 8’ 10’ and 12’ lengths.

How much waste do you reckon I should plan for?
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post #2 of 13 Old 02-10-2020, 01:18 AM
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From previous experience, I wouldn't use T&G if the porch is exposed to the elements.
In about 3 years we had to rip out the T&G and replace it with 2 x 6 and ľ spacing.

Rich
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post #3 of 13 Old 02-10-2020, 10:51 AM
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I'm not familiar with that products, but if it is PT you shouldn't have an issue, except I would say that the wood will still expand and contract with the seasons, and that can cause issues with T&G. I'm guessing in winter leave a small gap, in summer install it tight?

Assuming your joists are 16" centers, 12' lengths will have the lease waste & cutting. I would wrap the edges with a border (2-3 boards wide) mitered at the corners. This will look better and eliminate that pesky extra 6" to make more efficient use of boards.

I would estimate by calculating the number of runs and using 12' boards, figure 1 & 1/3 boards per run. Add a couple extra for a boo boo.

Robert
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post #4 of 13 Old 02-11-2020, 09:31 AM
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T&G will hold water which you don't want. Make two T spacers to keep the spacing consistent between boards as suggested by Rich.

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post #5 of 13 Old 02-11-2020, 10:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quickstep View Post
I’m re-flooring my front porch with 3” T&G flooring.
How much waste do you reckon I should plan for?
that was the question:
there are a few things that can affect the overall coverage.
will you be putting the boards down with staggered joints, etc.
or - one 6ft board for the total length from front to back.
the place that you order the lumber from should be able to provide
some accurate figures for you - personally, I would go with 10-15%
"waste". which to me is not really waste. you could find other projects
for the leftovers.
I have never used kiln dried P/T before so I have no experience with
the shrinkage/expansion factors, if any.

a question that was not asked is: how much weather will this porch receive?
is it totally enclosed, partially enclosed or totally open to the elements ?
are you planning to put any kind of finish on the floor after it is installed ??
photos of the existing porch would be nice to see.

.

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Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 02-11-2020 at 10:15 AM.
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post #6 of 13 Old 02-11-2020, 01:29 PM
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10%. if you want a class a job, then buy over (maybe 20-30%) and return the bad boards if they will take them back, pre-check and pre-arrange. if you can, pitch the floor 1/8 away from the house, and run the boards that direction if possible. on the drip end, make sure the water has a way to get out.

look into stainless or at least galvanized nails. many installers will pre finish both faces before install, then one more topcoat when done.
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Last edited by TimPa; 02-11-2020 at 01:33 PM.
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post #7 of 13 Old 02-12-2020, 07:05 AM Thread Starter
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The boards run lengthwise so I’ll need to have staggered joints. The long runs are 16’-6” so unfortunately I can’t use full lengths. The supplier of the kiln dried PT recommends painting all of the surfaces before installation which is probably a good practice anyway.

The manufacturer of the Kiln Dried After Treatment wood and the local supplier can’t seem to get on the same page about selling the stuff, so it looks like I’ll be using regular T&G SYP for the floor. in some ways, this makes it easier to plan because the SYP is readily available so I can always go back for more if I come up short.

I’d love to find a better choice, but it has to be 3/4” thick to fit under existing siding and it has to be T&G for appearance. Suggestions are welcome.

And... The porch is covered, but open.
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Last edited by Quickstep; 02-12-2020 at 07:20 AM.
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post #8 of 13 Old 02-12-2020, 09:13 AM
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Quick - I think I saw one of the home shows (Tommy Silva) that custom milled one run of boards to fit under the siding like you talk about that was thicker on one side (3/4" for example) and tapered down to the thickness of the field boards. that way, the home owner could use available Box Store planks for the whole project.
if that is not an option, you could find some 1/8" thick plastic and shim the underside of of the board that fits under the siding. as for painting the underside, I would look for mis-mixed paint at the store just to preserve the boards. color doesn't matter as it is never seen.

Planning materials for porch floor-t-g.png

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post #9 of 13 Old 02-12-2020, 12:21 PM Thread Starter
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John,


Thanks for the drawing and the info.


My situation is that I only have 3/4" under the siding, so that's kinda my limit. I'm attaching a drawing to describe that situation.


The second drawing describes the situation if I used thicker flooring material. Thicker material opens the door for other materials like Azek or Ipe, but I'd have to notch the first board which seems like a place for water to pool. Any ideas on how to solve for that?
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post #10 of 13 Old 02-12-2020, 01:28 PM
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do a google search for Isometric Caulk.
there are several grades for different applications.
depending on your climatic conditions, yada yada yada.
I would cut a special strip out of "dry" pressure treated
(or plastic board) that goes against any structure and after
it acclimates (drys some more), and caulk it.
the best solution would be to get some aluminum flashing
under the siding to run down the porch deck to prevent infiltration.
if you have to notch out a thicker board, that will probably negate that idea.
some creative angling of your cuts would create a clear drain.
I guess that will have to wait until you actually start your project
and have the materials on hand - for now, it is just speculation.
(of which I am not fond of).

.

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post #11 of 13 Old 02-12-2020, 02:33 PM
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we typically will rip a narrow board to fit under the siding, with the top having an angle to it that will carry water away from the house. this board can be the same thickness as the siding, and can just be tacked in. then leaving a 1/8" - 1/4" gap start your flooring boards. i usually rip the groove off the first board.

and yes proper flashing is assumed here.
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post #12 of 13 Old 02-12-2020, 06:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quickstep View Post
John,


Thanks for the drawing and the info.


My situation is that I only have 3/4" under the siding, so that's kinda my limit. I'm attaching a drawing to describe that situation.


The second drawing describes the situation if I used thicker flooring material. Thicker material opens the door for other materials like Azek or Ipe, but I'd have to notch the first board which seems like a place for water to pool. Any ideas on how to solve for that?
From your drawing, it looks like you are inviting water to come in under the vertical piece, as dirt collects in this area it will hold water which will also speed up the rotting process. Put some flashing (make it "L" shaped) behind the vertical wood, cut off a section of the vertical wood (at the bottom) at a 45 degree angle with the high side of the 45 degree cut against the wall, cut a matching PT piece that will slip up under and mate to the vertical piece.
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post #13 of 13 Old 02-13-2020, 09:14 AM Thread Starter
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I didn’t mention before that there is L shaped copper flashing that is behind and under the siding that comes out above the floor. That’s one of the reasons that my flooring material needs to stay at 3/4” since I really don’t want to muck with the flashing - or the siding for that matter.

The more I think about it, it doesn’t make sense to notch the first piece to get under the siding; it’s just a place for water to collect.

I think it might make most sense to have boards with gaps between so water can run through, bit I don’t know if I can sell that to the home office.
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