Planer or Jointer? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 28 Old 10-31-2019, 10:35 AM Thread Starter
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Planer or Jointer?

I am really looking to buy a benchtop planer.
Specifically the Dewalt DW735x. Rockler has a good buy with the stand and mobile cart all in one.
I wanted to get some opinions on which one I should buy first Planer or jointer.
I do have a Delta table saw and Glue line rip blade if that helps with the decision process.
I just wanted to get some more opinions before making this big purchase.

Also, if there are other recommendations for a different planer feel free to recommend.
That Dewalt seems to get some great reviews besides the blades wearing out fairly quick.

Thank You All
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post #2 of 28 Old 10-31-2019, 11:07 AM
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jointers make a board flat and straight on one side, then can make it square. It can not make the opposing sides parallel.

Planers can make opposing sides of a board parallel and to a given thickness, but can not make a board straight from end to end unless it has at least one flat straight edge to reference from.

Dewalt makes great planers, and they are real work horses. By the way the blades last quite a while. Well worth buying.

Gary

Last edited by gmercer_48083; 10-31-2019 at 11:09 AM.
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post #3 of 28 Old 10-31-2019, 11:13 AM
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I guess it really depends on what you build, how you buy your lumber, and what space you have available in your shop. I use both planer and jointer on most projects but I typically buy Walnut in the rough and frequently edge glue large panels so I need both. But if you buy S4S lumber and don't often need to thin boards or take them from rough then a jointer would probably be in order.

We upgraded to the 735 almost two years ago and it's been a really great machine, can't speak highly enough about it.

What are you building or planning to build?

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post #4 of 28 Old 10-31-2019, 11:29 AM Thread Starter
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So I have a small 12x22 garage so mobility is def a must. I also have a dust collection system to help with these big wood chewers.
I buy S4S mostly from Menards but I want to start finding rough lumber, barn siding and what not to re purpose into something
I am doing cabinets for in laws and am finding that you CANNOT build doors without getting 4 square sides.
I also have plans to build furniture starting off simple with kitchen cabinets, maybe a kitchen hutch.
Would love to work up to building a dresser someday.
Learning, learning and learning right now and I love it.

Thats what I wanted to hear about that Dewalt. Read a lot about the blades but those reviews could be biased.
I would like to have both one of these days.
I am thinking this planer is more expensive than a jointer so it would be a little easier to purchase the jointer down the road since i have the funds right now for the Dewalt.
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post #5 of 28 Old 10-31-2019, 11:41 AM
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I vote planer. I have a DeWalt DW735 and recommend it highly. I waited for a DW735 over the the lesser DW734 and other models. I have had a jointer in the past. A jointer is very useful too, but I would recommend buying a planer first. That's what I did. :-)
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post #6 of 28 Old 10-31-2019, 12:35 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tool Agnostic View Post
I vote planer. I have a DeWalt DW735 and recommend it highly. I waited for a DW735 over the the lesser DW734 and other models. I have had a jointer in the past. A jointer is very useful too, but I would recommend buying a planer first. That's what I did. :-)
Thanks Agnostic
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post #7 of 28 Old 10-31-2019, 12:52 PM
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It mostly depends upon the type of lumber you purchase. In my case, my supply is mostly s2s boards, so a planer is not necessary.



One day, after around 15 or 20 years in woodworking, Sears had one of the lower end Craftsman planers on sale at a price I could not refuse, so I bought it. Probably at least a year after that before it was ever used.


I had a jointer from the beginning and it was used a lot.


There are many, many threads on this forum on this subject. Did you do a search?


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post #8 of 28 Old 10-31-2019, 01:29 PM
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Realistically you need both, which you get first will depend on your situation, it is hard to straighten the face of a board without a jointer and equally hard to trim a board parallel without a planer. Which you select first is not that important if you are using a small amount of material and are able to hand pick to eliminate one of the defects to begin with. With woodworking there are always work arounds so many of the recommendations of one over the other will come from those that have suitable alternatives which you may or may not have.

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post #9 of 28 Old 10-31-2019, 03:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GSXRFanIM View Post
Thats what I wanted to hear about that Dewalt. Read a lot about the blades but those reviews could be biased.
I have probably run at least 2,000 bd. ft. of Walnut and maybe 100 bd. ft. of Maple and Cherry through our 735 in the two years we've had the planer and it's still on the original blades (700 bd. ft. of Walnut just in the last 3 months). I don't see any need to change blades right now, either.

I had a Delta DJ-15 6" jointer that I bought new in 1990 but sold it a few years ago after finding a long bed Powermatic 6" on Craigslist for $500. It had some light surface rust but cleaned up nicely.

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post #10 of 28 Old 10-31-2019, 04:10 PM
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i use my neighbor's helical cut dewalt planer, it may be more, but the cut is worth it
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post #11 of 28 Old 10-31-2019, 05:25 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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The 3 basic machines ....

First is the primary machine, the table saw. It requires that only a straight, flat board be placed down on the table and against the fence OR you may/will get a kickback when the board rocks or twists during your cut! It's definitely a safety issue.

Only a jointer can make the face of a board straight and flat, but it can also do the same to the edge, so now you are ready for the table saw. Based on that, get a jointer first.

If you want boards a specific thickness, you can resaw them on the tablesaw IF they aren't greater than 7" wide. If you have a thickness planer, you can also make them a specific thickness with both faces parallel to each other. So, you can do a lot with a table saw and a jointer, and add a thickness planer later. That's what I did.

A bandsaw came before the thickness planer, in my case, however.
A bandsaw is very versatile and is THE most underrated machine in woodworking. I have 7 of them in different sizes, with 2 for metal cutting.
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 10-31-2019 at 07:22 PM.
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post #12 of 28 Old 10-31-2019, 05:32 PM
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I have always had a planer and sometimes had a jointer
The planer gets used some pf the time and the jointer rarely ever gets used.
The 'sometimes' with the planer is because it was more economical is a small commercial shop to buy my hardwood S3S. I had more than capable planers, just that it is a slow process for a commercial wood shop. When I purchased the hardwood at Houston Hardwoods, I would tell them to plane all the boards alike and stop the process as soon as both sides look good. Normally my 4/4 stock came over-sized and so when they planed it the way i wanted it, I would
end up with a planed thickness of 7/8" and sometimes a little thicker. I prefer table tops to be thicker than 3/4" if at all possible. It's only when i had the scraps left over from other various projects, they were all slightly different in thickness, and that's when I would use my own planer.

The straight line rip (SLR) is a whiz on a table saw and you can make perfect joining surfaces with just about any blade. Just make a quickee SLR jig and run a board through it. Then take it off the jig and use the table saw and fence to make the edges parallel.

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post #13 of 28 Old 10-31-2019, 06:02 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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SLR jigs ...

They are faster than a jointer for an edge, BUT they will NOT flatten a face, which you do need for safety on the table saw. A twisted board is not the best idea to run through the table saw. I've done it, but it's a bit risky and I do not recommend it, however.
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #14 of 28 Old 10-31-2019, 06:10 PM
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Dewalt makes some great products. I own several. However, take your time and make your decision based on research. For me, I own a 13”, 3-knive planar but I also own a 15” with spiral cutter head. Hands down, the spiral cutter head makes a much finer cut. It’s not even comparable. Plus I don’t have to sharpen the blades.
Just for comparison: Grizzly offers a great 13” planer with spiral cutter head for $695. Model G0889Z. No, it doesn’t have a stand but for me I would get the spiral head and build myself a stand.
Now to answer your question planer or a jointer: This can be such a personal preference but I would buy a planar before I buy a jointer 7 days a week and twice on Sunday.
https://www.grizzly.com/products/Gri...terhead/G0889Z

WAOM
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post #15 of 28 Old 10-31-2019, 06:44 PM
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I guess the times have changed, most of us older guys probably had a jointer years ago because we could pick up a used 4" Craftsman for around a $100, affordable planers were not around so we got along without one as long as possible.

Now with the lunchboxes around there is some choice.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #16 of 28 Old 10-31-2019, 09:02 PM
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There was a string on the same issue on another forum and someone brought up the Cutech brand. They have a pretty good reputation and their pricing is pretty good The pictures are of the lunchbox, 13 inch planer and an 8 inch bench top jointer. Both have spiral heads with carbide tips. The jointer was about $500, the planer is near $700. That company relabels and sells equipment made elsewhere, but they pick the cream of the crop of those companies output. The jointer has extensions to give you a longer table. One of our very active members had nothing but praise for the planer, and a spiral head with replaceable tips, he said, produces a glass smooth surface.

I have the 735 and love it. I also have a 6 inch PowerMatic jointer, but like most, I wish I'd popped for a wider unit, at least 8 inch. Getting wood prepped is MUCH easier with both tools.

Since you are going to be using a lot of hand tools, give the Wood River hand planes a good looking over. Their 4 1/2 inch jack plane is versatile and well made. If you want to hand plane things flat, you'll wand a #6 or #7 jointing plane. A low angle block plane is also a must and a rabbet plane will also come in handy. You will also want a first rate set of chisels. I gave up on most sharpening methods and now use mostly those great diamond "stones". Sharpening is a skill you develop over, and you'll also want a nice, wide sharpening jig--can't recall the best brand's name.
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post #17 of 28 Old 10-31-2019, 10:10 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony B View Post
The straight line rip (SLR) is a whiz on a table saw and you can make perfect joining surfaces with just about any blade. Just make a quickee SLR jig and run a board through it. Then take it off the jig and use the table saw and fence to make the edges parallel.
Good tip Tony. I will definitely try that
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Last edited by difalkner; 10-31-2019 at 11:34 PM. Reason: fixed quote
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post #18 of 28 Old 10-31-2019, 10:25 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ibboykin View Post
Dewalt makes some great products. I own several. However, take your time and make your decision based on research. For me, I own a 13”, 3-knive planar but I also own a 15” with spiral cutter head. Hands down, the spiral cutter head makes a much finer cut. It’s not even comparable. Plus I don’t have to sharpen the blades.
Just for comparison: Grizzly offers a great 13” planer with spiral cutter head for $695. Model G0889Z. No, it doesn’t have a stand but for me I would get the spiral head and build myself a stand.
Now to answer your question planer or a jointer: This can be such a personal preference but I would buy a planar before I buy a jointer 7 days a week and twice on Sunday.
https://www.grizzly.com/products/Gri...terhead/G0889Z
Oh yeah, i like that Grizzly. I came across it when I was doing research on bench top planers.
Thanks for the input
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post #19 of 28 Old 10-31-2019, 10:29 PM
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I used to have 3 SLR's. A 4', 6' and 8' jig
just hang them on the wall

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Retired woodworker, amongst other things, Sold full time cruising boat and now full time cruising in RV. Currently in Somerville, Tx
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post #20 of 28 Old 11-07-2019, 10:24 PM
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Woodnthings hit the nail on the head. Probably the best way to arrive at your answer is to understand the workflow thru the shop: A stick comes in the door, goes directly to the jointer for a flat face that is square to another flat face, THEN it moves on to the planer for the remaining parallel surfaces.

I had my wonderful Rigid 13” planer (same as the Cutech shown in the photo) for years before I finally got around to getting my wonderful vintage Delta 6” Professional jointer. That was okay only because I was using pre-milled wood, but then I needed to completely mill my own sticks and the jointer was essential for that.

I love, love, LOVE my jointer! It is such a satisfying thing to be able to take a total POS piece of wood that is rough, twisted, crooked, nasty and in less than 2 minutes turn it into a beautiful and straight stick. Hands down, jointing is one of my very favorite processes in the shop, and chasing that result with a TS is a very tedious and mediocre workaround with serious limits to boot.

The fact is that in most furniture we only need the exposed faces to be square and surfaced; a lot of antique furniture is fabricated this way. Also, after you have those first 2 flat and square surfaces, you can then complete the task of getting S4S with hand planes.
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