Pipe sealant that makes it hard to get pipes apart - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 10 Old 12-10-2018, 10:09 AM Thread Starter
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Pipe sealant that makes it hard to get pipes apart

Back in my younger days, we used a pipe sealant that dried hard. It made pipes hard to get apart, but man, they didn’t leak or slip.

Now all I see are sealants that are designed to make it easy to get pipes apart.

I’m working on plumbing a regulator and water separator on a new compressor and tight pipe joints are on my mind because on my old compressor, I could never get the joints to stay tight. They’d always work loose from connecting and disconnecting hoses and it drove me nuts.

On the new compressor, I’ve noticed a red sealant on the pipe connections that looks like the stuff we used to use. Does anyone know what that is?

I’m using locktite, but I know that’s not really made for plumbing.
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post #2 of 10 Old 12-10-2018, 10:58 AM
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There are Loctite products made for sealing pipes:

http://www.loctite.com.au/thread-sealing-4048.htm
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post #3 of 10 Old 12-10-2018, 10:59 AM
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What type of joints are you writing about?


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post #4 of 10 Old 12-10-2018, 12:14 PM
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I use the Teflon tape

I've never had a air compressor connection leak or come apart when I used the Teflon tape. There is no need for any sealant on "compression" type fittings only on threaded fittings. For regular steel threaded pipe I use the brush on "pipe dope" sealant made for those types of connections. You just want to "seal" them, not "lock" them together.

https://www.finehomebuilding.com/200...-and-pipe-dope

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 12-10-2018 at 02:04 PM.
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post #5 of 10 Old 12-10-2018, 01:48 PM
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The purpose of Teflon tape or pipe dope is not only to seal but also to lubricate the threads so they do not gall when tightened, done properly they should not come loose. As for replacing and removing hoses quick couplers will solve that problem, just don't go cheap on them.

I have a coupler on the compressor outlet because I like to use a flexible hose connected to the tool, sometimes I have to add additional hose which is not flexible to get to the back forty, so it gets connected to the compressor first.

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post #6 of 10 Old 12-10-2018, 02:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quickstep View Post
Back in my younger days, we used a pipe sealant that dried hard. It made pipes hard to get apart, but man, they didnít leak or slip.

Now all I see are sealants that are designed to make it easy to get pipes apart.

Iím working on plumbing a regulator and water separator on a new compressor and tight pipe joints are on my mind because on my old compressor, I could never get the joints to stay tight. Theyíd always work loose from connecting and disconnecting hoses and it drove me nuts.

On the new compressor, Iíve noticed a red sealant on the pipe connections that looks like the stuff we used to use. Does anyone know what that is?

Iím using locktite, but I know thatís not really made for plumbing.
I think if you are having joints come loose then you are not tightening them enough. On my compressors I can usually park them for a month or more and when I plug them back in they don't even turn on. I had a speedaire compressor that sat for a year onetime and didn't leak down.

As far as pipe sealant I like the Oatley Great Blue. It's a brush on sealant that works very well.
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post #7 of 10 Old 12-10-2018, 05:46 PM
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Steve is right Great Blue is some good stuff


Permatex gasket shellac is also a very good pipe dope, diesel fuel is super hard to stop leaks in threaded pipe, gasket shellac seals it right up. I am talking about 1-2 in BIP

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post #8 of 10 Old 12-11-2018, 07:09 PM Thread Starter
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The challenge I’ve had is when plumbing compressor accessories that have to have a certain orientation. The water separator for example needs to be straight up and down, but “tight” might not result in the proper orientation, yet it might not make the remainder of the turn to be straight up and down. A little less important with the regulator, but you do need to end up so you can see that gauge.
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post #9 of 10 Old 12-11-2018, 09:15 PM
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There should be enough slack in the threads you could turn the pipe almost a full revolution past when it's tight enough to hold compressed air. That should be enough to get proper alignment for the accessory. If you would use PVC it would get downright easy.
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post #10 of 10 Old 12-12-2018, 11:55 AM
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The problem arises when you get half way around and decide to back the fitting up to align it, use pipe dope and go by feel, you generally know when you can make one more turn, the pipe dope adds enough lube to get you there.

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