Pin Nailer Or 18 Gauge? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 20 Old 10-26-2019, 01:59 AM Thread Starter
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Pin Nailer Or 18 Gauge?

I was in the local woodworkers shop looking at small nailers thinking I should get an 18 gauge but the guy that was helping me told me that he uses a pin nailer for almost all his smaller (like boxes and things) projects with excellent results. The pins hold the pieces tight and are almost invisible. In addition as opposed to the 18 gauge nailer won't split the wood. If you were to get one nailer which size would you find most useful? Thanks, BillF
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post #2 of 20 Old 10-26-2019, 07:34 AM
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I have a pin nailer and like it. Does all that I desire. Even used it to tack up fence boards to keep them in place until I could screw them into place.


Never tried an 18 gauge.


george
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post #3 of 20 Old 10-26-2019, 08:26 AM
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Bill, get BOTH nailers. then add more when you see the need.
there is no sense in having just one pneumatic stapler or
nailer in the shop.
.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --
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post #4 of 20 Old 10-26-2019, 11:02 AM
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What that fella at the woodworking shop said has merit but then so does owning an 18 gauge brad nailer. John says "get both nailers", be like John.

Dave

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The closer it gets to the end, the faster it goes.
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post #5 of 20 Old 10-26-2019, 12:09 PM
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Wow now I been using my 18 gauge for alot of projects and forgotten all about getting a pin nailer until I saw this thread :).

Marlin
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post #6 of 20 Old 10-26-2019, 12:20 PM
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I don't think that a pin nailer has enough holding power for bigger stuff like larger window or door molding.

The pin nailer is indispensable for nailing small stuff and the holes they make are nearly invisible.

I use the pin nailer for furniture making projects, but the 18 gauge for construction type stuff.

So, the only clear answer is to get both!

As long as we're helping you spend your hard earned money, a cordless (Paslode) 18ga nailer is really convenient.
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post #7 of 20 Old 10-26-2019, 03:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
If you were to get one nailer which size would you find most useful? Thanks, BillF
imo pin guns are limited in use and size
a cheap 18 ga air nail gun that can shoot 5/8-1.5" finish is very useful for 3/4 stock and trim
i also have a 20 year old paslode 16 ga cordless, it is pretty badass
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post #8 of 20 Old 10-26-2019, 04:31 PM
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I can not tell you what to do. I can relay my experience.

I bought a compressor and it came with an 18 gauge or brad nailer. I love it. The 18 gauge can not do everything so:
To do some framing work I bought a framing gun.
To do some door jamb trim I bought a 16 gauge gun.
To do some raised panel rattle prevention I bought a pin or 23 gauge gun.
But I needed some long inch staples so I bought a HF 18 gauge staple gun at HF.
But I needed to do some inch wide staples so I bought two on sale at HF. One with 3/8 long and one with 1/2 long staples.
Then the neighborhood kids wanted to fill their bicycle tires, basket balls and soccer balls. Their parents wanted to fill their tires, etc. So I bought long hoses to reach everything. Oh, but you need the needle to fill all the balls so I bought. . . . And so it goes.

I was doing something with the 18 gauge in an awkward position and the gun bounced, multiple firing and not burying the nail so I bought a discontinued Hitachi (Now Metabo.) from Lowes. It is a single fire and bump-firing can be locked out. I sold the old one on Craig's List.

I was having some work done on the house and I traded the framing gun for a discount of more than I paid for it to the contractor.

In woodworking I use the brad or 18 gauge more than the others. I use the 23 gauge Pin gun probably almost as much. Both guns are used, to quote Norm, "Just to hold it place until the glue sets." :)

A few bits of advice on use.
Oil. Oil today. Oil tomorrow. OIL OIL OIL OIL. Every time that you use the gun, 3 to 5 drops of oil in the air inlet. This keeps the gun from jamming. If you are using the gun heavily, oil every 3 or 4 hours. There is all kinds of oil out there. But use an oil labeled as "Air Tool Oil". Sta Lube makes some and comes in pint(?) bottles about $6 at Harbor Freight. A pint should last you for many years even with heavy use. I bought some glue concertina bottles from Woodcraft for injecting glue into crevasses but used one with air tool oil. Three to five drops is very easy.

For all the guns except the Pin nailer, it doesn't matter where the nails come from as long as they are clean and not too long. The 23 gauge Pin nails must be good hard steel. Buy a brand name. The Pin nails from HF are too soft and tend to follow the grain. I have had HF Pin nails from HF turn 180 and come back out at me in Red Oak. These pins are usually available at woodworking stores, sometimes at HD or Lowes.

With the Pin nails, I rarely use anything longer than 5/8. Sometimes but never longer. If you think about it, you're not trying to frame a house with a pin nailer.

Rich
In furniture 1/32" is a Grand Canyon
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post #9 of 20 Old 10-26-2019, 04:41 PM
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Just an after thought or two:

LOWES is the retailer for Hitachi. It appears that Hitachi is getting out of the pneumatic tool business and selling to Metabo. If you need any of the Hitachi line of tools, rush to your local Lowes and grab what you need. The tools are quality and are being discounted while they last.

If you don't see what you need, ASK. Ask if there are any in the back, especially an open box. The open box may be discounted even more. Before Christmas I bought an $800 tool box, dented for $400. Always look for the open box specials and ask for discounts.
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post #10 of 20 Old 10-27-2019, 06:33 PM Thread Starter
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Hitachi Renames to Metabo

Hi NoThankYou, thanks for taking the time to answer my posting so I thought I would clarify that Hitachi has actually just rebranded or renamed all their power tool line to Metabo HPT in North America. Was concerned at first as I just recently purchased their 12" sliding compound miter saw (great tool) named so I checked up on it.
post #11 of 20 Old 10-27-2019, 08:40 PM
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The 18 gauge brad nailer has the most general utility, but when you need a pin nailer, you need a pin nailer. The 18 gauge is enough to hold together nearly anything while the glue dries, ive used one to put together anything from rolling cabinets to outdoor chairs. Fantastic thing for making jigs as well, even without glue a couple quick nails keeps everything together. Pin nailers shine for things like hanging complicated molding where you would have a hard time hiding the hole. They dont offer much holding power, but they are nearly invisible.

For general purpose stuff and as a first nailgun, go with the brad nailer. Youll probably end up with both down the line, but the brad should be the first buy. Just avoid the brad/narrow crown stapler combos, those things are garbage
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post #12 of 20 Old 10-28-2019, 01:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by epicfail48 View Post
For general purpose stuff and as a first nail gun, go with the brad nailer. You'll probably end up with both down the line, but the brad should be the first buy.
And, depending upon your will power the brad nailer will be an only child or one of many.

Rich
In furniture 1/32" is a Grand Canyon
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post #13 of 20 Old 10-28-2019, 03:04 AM Thread Starter
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Ok, I obviously have no will power. I ordered both the pin and brad nailers :-) both Hitachi/Metabo HPT. Thanks everyone for your input and helping me spend money LOL
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post #14 of 20 Old 10-28-2019, 09:15 AM
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I have both, a Hitachi 23 & 18 gauge nailer. The best accessory you can get for your nailers is a Flexzilla hose. It's almost like not having a hose hooked to your nailer.

https://www.amazon.com/Flexzilla-Fit...8-a3e9fa2d363b

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
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post #15 of 20 Old 10-28-2019, 04:45 PM
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I buy equipment as projects require it. Wait for a project and get the appropriate nailer. Or just watch for sales on the equipment and buy it when it is cheap.
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post #16 of 20 Old 10-28-2019, 06:43 PM
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I have nailers in almost all sizes, and a PC pin nailer was the last one, and just a little FYI to NoThankYou, some nailers are no oil machines


I use PC pins and have been very surprised at the performance, a couple times I have nailed projects together with the pin nailer and and tried to disassemble because I messed up they held good enough that the pin broke before it pulled out, it has been getting used more and more, if in doubt just shoot a couple extras to make sure it will hold LOL



Also works great for a clamp when gluing

There is no app for experience
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post #17 of 20 Old 10-28-2019, 08:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Catpower View Post
I have nailers in almost all sizes, and a PC pin nailer was the last one, and just a little FYI to NoThankYou, some nailers are no oil machines
I have seen those also. I don't have the courage to try them. By brad, recently sold, required oil. Never had a jam in close to 20 years. My PC finishing nailer (16 Gauge) I only put a drop of oil in when doing some crown molding jammed after the second piece being nailed in place. With that one I use 5 drops.

Rich
In furniture 1/32" is a Grand Canyon
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post #18 of 20 Old 10-29-2019, 01:35 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks! I got a similar 3/8" 25' orange PVC hose from Harbor Freight as I needed one right away. Its ok for a cheap hose but I put this one on my wish list, my way of saving a good tool for later. I was kind of still thinking old school figuring I would get a rubber hose until my son convinced me to try these lightweight hoses and I'm glad I did.
post #19 of 20 Old 10-29-2019, 02:54 AM
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I hate to say this but the HF hoses tend to leak from the center air carrying part of the hose into the PVC shell / jacket or what ever it is. The hose then gets to be about 1 inch in diameter.

My suggestion is to take it back and buy a good hose from either Lowes / Menards / Home Depot / Granger. I did buy a rubber hose, branded Goodyear, for my air tools. It sits on a HF manual crank reel under pressure 24x7 and has been there for at least 15 years. I never notice the weight of the hose. What I do notice is that it is a PITA to unroll/roll when neighbors need to pump up car tires.

BTW - I do keep a spare hose in the cabinet. I use that hose as an extension to the existing hose when I need air in the house. The hose from the cabinet is CLEAN whereas the one on the reel is dirty.

Rich
In furniture 1/32" is a Grand Canyon

Last edited by NoThankyou; 10-29-2019 at 02:58 AM.
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post #20 of 20 Old 11-01-2019, 11:54 AM
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Just like using actual nails, one size does not work on everything, get a pin, an 18, and a 1/4 crown, and add more later.
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