Pig tails - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 18 Old 02-24-2019, 10:34 PM Thread Starter
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Pig tails

I've got a big box store orbital. I recently grabbed some diablo sanding pads. What cause the pig tails. Poor quality pads? Jumping grits?( 80,120,180) or the orbital itself?

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post #2 of 18 Old 02-24-2019, 11:16 PM
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I would say the sand paper and maybe a little too much pressure on the sander. 80 grit is pretty rough unless removing some heavy stuff rough stuff.
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post #3 of 18 Old 02-25-2019, 01:03 AM
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As BigJim said, 80 grit is too coarse and too much pressure. With most ROS the weight of the sander is enough to accomplish the task. As the sand paper wears, then slight pressure. A lot of pressure says time to change the disk.

I usually start with 120 grit then 180 for an oil finish and if a stain then 220. For end grain I'll go up to 400 or 600 to prevent the end grain from absorbing too much finish and darkening.
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post #4 of 18 Old 02-25-2019, 06:23 AM Thread Starter
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I would say the sand paper and maybe a little too much pressure on the sander. 80 grit is pretty rough unless removing some heavy stuff rough stuff.
I made a few tops this weekend out of the pine board from HD the more expensive wood they offer but didnt have long enough clamps. I improvised. I belt sanded the bottom of top with belt sander for glue squeeze out. And because I need them done quickly used a short clamp time glue. Was not able to wipe off all squeeze out on top before it got too hard. I thought 120 wasnt going to take it off quick enough and flush sand the boards. I used biscuits every 18 inches but clamps prevented me from really flushing very well. I will remeber this advice. I am going with klingspore next as well. Here is a pic of longer top so you can see how I had to clamp it.

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post #5 of 18 Old 02-25-2019, 12:46 PM
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Can you post a photo of the pigtails that you are seeing?

I have a Ridgid ROS (random orbital sander) that I bought at Home Depot. I use Diablo sanding pads in an assortment of grits: 80, 120, 150, 220.

I don't skip grits. I use the weight of the sander and don't press down. I attach the sander to my shop vac to remove dust. I start and stop the sander with the disc on the workpiece. I stop and check my work frequently with a straightedge.

I have not seen pigtails, but I always do a little bit of touch up hand sanding. I use a sanding block, and always sand with the grain. I know that the ROS is "random", so I want to do that last bit of final sanding with the grain. Habit, I suppose.

Could the problem be related to poor dust collection?

For me, the dangers are:

* Not sanding evenly. I keep a straightedge handy as a reference, and check frequently.
* Recognizing that more sanding in a particular spot is not the solution, but I must sand everything else down to match it. It is a variation of the point above.
* Rounding edges when I don't want them rounded.
* Hand sanding without a block. I don't want to leave "finger ripples" (my term) in the wood.

I haven't used the ROS in a while, but I have a red oak wall shelf project in progress, and the next step is sanding with the ROS, so I will pay attention. I may not get to it until later in the week. I will post an update if I learn anything interesting.
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post #6 of 18 Old 02-25-2019, 12:53 PM
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I've found that I get those markings if I move the ROS around too quickly on the workpiece, especially with coarser grits.
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post #7 of 18 Old 02-25-2019, 12:59 PM
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I think the sander rpm has a lot to do with it. I sand with a porter cable quicksand sander which runs very fast. I seldom have problems with swirl marks from diablo 80x pads.
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post #8 of 18 Old 02-25-2019, 01:20 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Tool Agnostic View Post
Can you post a photo of the pigtails that you are seeing?



I have a Ridgid ROS (random orbital sander) that I bought at Home Depot. I use Diablo sanding pads in an assortment of grits: 80, 120, 150, 220.



I don't skip grits. I use the weight of the sander and don't press down. I attach the sander to my shop vac to remove dust. I start and stop the sander with the disc on the workpiece. I stop and check my work frequently with a straightedge.



I have not seen pigtails, but I always do a little bit of touch up hand sanding. I use a sanding block, and always sand with the grain. I know that the ROS is "random", so I want to do that last bit of final sanding with the grain. Habit, I suppose.



Could the problem be related to poor dust collection?



For me, the dangers are:



* Not sanding evenly. I keep a straightedge handy as a reference, and check frequently.

* Recognizing that more sanding in a particular spot is not the solution, but I must sand everything else down to match it. It is a variation of the point above.

* Rounding edges when I don't want them rounded.

* Hand sanding without a block. I don't want to leave "finger ripples" (my term) in the wood.



I haven't used the ROS in a while, but I have a red oak wall shelf project in progress, and the next step is sanding with the ROS, so I will pay attention. I may not get to it until later in the week. I will post an update if I learn anything interesting.
I have the rigid 5" purchased it before the weekend. I've already had the top delivered. It wasnt an issue the guy. It's a family member and he used very dark stain. It might be the uneven surface. I had the boards tweak just a 32nd on I got impatient.

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post #9 of 18 Old 02-25-2019, 01:20 PM Thread Starter
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I think the sander rpm has a lot to do with it. I sand with a porter cable quicksand sander which runs very fast. I seldom have problems with swirl marks from diablo 80x pads.
When do you adjusted the speed? I ran the rigid on 6 speed fastest it moved

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post #10 of 18 Old 02-25-2019, 01:21 PM Thread Starter
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I've found that I get those markings if I move the ROS around too quickly on the workpiece, especially with coarser grits.
I tried varying my sanding speed movement no avail

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post #11 of 18 Old 02-25-2019, 02:38 PM
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When do you adjusted the speed? I ran the rigid on 6 speed fastest it moved

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The sander I have only has one speed. I don't really see a need for a slower speed so if I had one like yours I would set it on the fastest speed and leave it there.

You might also be creating swirl marks if you are moving the sander too fast. It needs to sand at it's own pace.
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post #12 of 18 Old 02-25-2019, 07:00 PM
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Were the sanding disks "corning"? Getting little chunks embedded in the grit? This would also leave marks in the wood. I ask because you stated you were rushing the job and I'm wondering if semi-cured glue was getting embedded in the grit and the heat from the sanding friction was setting the corns into hard little spots.
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post #13 of 18 Old 02-25-2019, 07:18 PM Thread Starter
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Were the sanding disks "corning"? Getting little chunks embedded in the grit? This would also leave marks in the wood. I ask because you stated you were rushing the job and I'm wondering if semi-cured glue was getting embedded in the grit and the heat from the sanding friction was setting the corns into hard little spots.
That's a good thought. There were little ones not many though. I'll keep an eye out next time. I was sanding with 220 mirko today and encounter no swirls

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post #14 of 18 Old 02-25-2019, 08:18 PM
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I tried varying my sanding speed movement no avail

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The sander I have only has one speed. I don't really see a need for a slower speed so if I had one like yours I would set it on the fastest speed and leave it there.

You might also be creating swirl marks if you are moving the sander too fast. It needs to sand at it's own pace.
I run the Ridgid ROS from Home Depot at full speed always. I haven't found a need where I might use a slower speed.

Does anyone run their ROS at less than full speed? If so, under what circumstances would you want to slow it down?
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post #15 of 18 Old 02-25-2019, 10:36 PM
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The sander I have only has one speed. I don't really see a need for a slower speed so if I had one like yours I would set it on the fastest speed and leave it there.

You might also be creating swirl marks if you are moving the sander too fast. It needs to sand at it's own pace.

I do that too, no need for slower speeds so i just leave it on the fastest.


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post #16 of 18 Old 02-26-2019, 07:53 AM
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I run the Ridgid ROS from Home Depot at full speed always. I haven't found a need where I might use a slower speed.

Does anyone run their ROS at less than full speed? If so, under what circumstances would you want to slow it down?
I don't really know but I suspect it has to do with sanding metal. Even drilling metal the slower speeds work better.
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post #17 of 18 Old 02-26-2019, 08:04 AM
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I always thought that faster speeds with an ROS made for more agressive stock removal. I usually run my Bosch ROS at higher speeds with coarser grits to level and then slow things down as I work through to finer grits. I also run it on the slowest speed with a polishing bonnet mounted.
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post #18 of 18 Old 02-28-2019, 11:14 PM
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Move the sander at the pace of one inch per second. That reduces a lot of the swirls. Some sandpaper has poorly glued abrasive. The little rocks get loose and get swirled around. Use good sandpaper. I like the stuff intended for the automotive industry.
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