Painting wooden panels - How to do it properly? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 9 Old 01-20-2017, 02:59 PM Thread Starter
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Painting wooden panels - How to do it properly?

Hello,
I initially planned to strip my wooden panels and stain them so that the wood texture is kept but unfortunately the tests I've made with the strip sample wall didn't turned out well, as the wood natural color is dark and any stain I used (even very light colors) always came out dark and I want lighter color for the walls to give a contrast to the dark hardwood floor I have.
I've decided to make a 180 degrees change and paint the wall panels in white and give a fresh new look to the whole room.
What is the right process for painting wood panels to smooth Matte white with the grains no longer visible.
The panels currently have clear semi gloss coat on them (not sure which type), would appreciate step by step process with regards to wood filler for the defects, sanding (which grit/grits and how much to sand, when is it enough before applying the primer), the correct primer and paint types as well as a protective layer which doesn't have any gloss whatsoever.
Also, how should I sand the grooves? is there a tool I can order online which will make it easier and more effective? to me this seems like the hardest part in the whole process.

Your assistance is very much appreciated.
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post #2 of 9 Old 01-20-2017, 03:17 PM
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Daniel,
Is this wood paneling or wood panels? I would just pull off the paneling if that's what it is and put up something else. If it is actual wood panels, though, then maybe you could bleach them to lighten them up. There are a number of good threads here and on other woodworking forums that deal with bleaching wood.

Good luck!

Scott
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post #3 of 9 Old 01-20-2017, 03:28 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sbrader View Post
Daniel,
Is this wood paneling or wood panels? I would just pull off the paneling if that's what it is and put up something else. If it is actual wood panels, though, then maybe you could bleach them to lighten them up. There are a number of good threads here and on other woodworking forums that deal with bleaching wood.

Good luck!

Scott
Sorry I wasn't clear, its Veneer wide wall panels with grooves.
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post #4 of 9 Old 01-20-2017, 03:41 PM Thread Starter
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post #5 of 9 Old 01-20-2017, 10:11 PM
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Prep the walls for painting.
The best finish will be a spayed on finish.
Mask berthing for spraying
Start by spaying on a primer/sealer.
Follow with your final paint color.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #6 of 9 Old 01-21-2017, 12:30 AM
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The first thing you should do is thoroughly clean everything with soap and water. Then again with a wax and grease remover.

It would be helpful if you can determine what kind of finish it has on it now and what condition the finish is in. If the finish is flaking off in spots the rest is soon to follow. It would be a never ending job touching up the finish if it's starting to go. In an inconspicuous place put some lacquer thinner on it and let is soak a little and see what happens. If the finish melts and get's sticky it's either a shellac or lacquer finish. If it does nothing it's likely polyurethane. If it wrinkles up like you put paint stripper on it it's likely plain old oil based varnish. From the picture my best guess is it's a nitrocellulose lacquer. Now having done that recoating an old finish you are at the mercy of the old finish. You could do everything right and in five years the old finish might decide to come off taking the paint off with it. The only sure thing for durability is to strip the old finish down to bare wood and start over.

If the finish is shellac or lacquer you could scuff sand it and seal it with a shellac based primer and then use the paint of your choice. If the finish is either varnish or polyurethane then I would scuff sand it and prime it with an oil based bonding primer. From there you could topcoat it with the paint of your choice.

To get everything as smooth as you want the primer and finish should be sprayed, sanding between coats. Usually painting over a stain finish you can also expect to find a bunch of defects you can't see right now. Once it gets a coat of white primer on it all these places show up so expect to a bunch of spackle work and then having to come back and spot prime these places again.
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post #7 of 9 Old 01-23-2017, 08:53 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
The first thing you should do is thoroughly clean everything with soap and water. Then again with a wax and grease remover.

It would be helpful if you can determine what kind of finish it has on it now and what condition the finish is in. If the finish is flaking off in spots the rest is soon to follow. It would be a never ending job touching up the finish if it's starting to go. In an inconspicuous place put some lacquer thinner on it and let is soak a little and see what happens. If the finish melts and get's sticky it's either a shellac or lacquer finish. If it does nothing it's likely polyurethane. If it wrinkles up like you put paint stripper on it it's likely plain old oil based varnish. From the picture my best guess is it's a nitrocellulose lacquer. Now having done that recoating an old finish you are at the mercy of the old finish. You could do everything right and in five years the old finish might decide to come off taking the paint off with it. The only sure thing for durability is to strip the old finish down to bare wood and start over.

If the finish is shellac or lacquer you could scuff sand it and seal it with a shellac based primer and then use the paint of your choice. If the finish is either varnish or polyurethane then I would scuff sand it and prime it with an oil based bonding primer. From there you could topcoat it with the paint of your choice.

To get everything as smooth as you want the primer and finish should be sprayed, sanding between coats. Usually painting over a stain finish you can also expect to find a bunch of defects you can't see right now. Once it gets a coat of white primer on it all these places show up so expect to a bunch of spackle work and then having to come back and spot prime these places again.
Thank you so much Steve!
Stripping to the bare wood would be a very complicated project but I might go for it if needed.
However, assuming that I would like to go for the sanding option rather than stripping:
1. What grit should I use for sanding the finish and do I need to sand with additional grits or can I apply the primer afterwards?
2. How many coats of primer should I do for a smooth surface and What sand paper grit should I use on each of the coats?
3. How many coats of paint should I do and should I sand between coats?

Thank you so much!!!
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post #8 of 9 Old 01-23-2017, 09:59 AM
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You don't have to strip the old finish off to paint. I just wanted you to be aware you would be at the mercy of the old finish. You just never know how long it will last.

Sand the old finish with 180. Paint needs a mechanical bond and the scratches created by the sandpaper gives the paint something to grab onto. Still you need to do some testing as I outlined before painting over another finish. Lacquer is especially difficult for other paints to bond to even if you rough it up with sandpaper. This is why I recommend shellac based products to make the transition for that. Basically you have to free the surface of dirt and wax and use a compatible primer before painting.

The amount of primer and preparation will vary from project to project. Pretend you are trying to create a smooth dead flat paint job on the wall. When you get it perfect then think of paint.

As far as sanding between coats unless you are using a very thin paint such as lacquer it would be fine to sand with 180 grit. It's just the scratches will transfer through thin paint but won't through an enamel. The 180 grit will cut better and make for less work. If you do notice the sandpaper marks transferring through then change to 220 grit.

When you topcoat put as many coats on until you are satisfied with it. If it looks great after the first coat I would leave it alone. Usually to put a second coat on just to be putting a second coat on something goes wrong and you end up having to put several more coats on trying to fix it and it ends up never looking as good as the first coat. If there are thin spots or the sheen is uneven then that is another story.
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post #9 of 9 Old 01-23-2017, 10:43 AM Thread Starter
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Wow, you are such a wonderful person to take the time and help others, thank you sir!
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