painful lesson learned - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 18 Old 01-21-2013, 01:03 AM Thread Starter
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painful lesson learned

I was running a piece of blood wood through the planer and realized after it wasn't long enough to go right through so I grabbed a piece of scrap to push it through. Didn't work so well. And needless to say I was a very lucky boy.
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post #2 of 18 Old 01-21-2013, 01:09 AM
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Yup! Gonna hurt for a couple days or so.
As the Doc I am---keep it clean, advise using TAO or neosporin to the wounds twice daily, and a good bandaid to the finger for couple days--they'll heal. Glad it wasn't worse---coulda been.
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post #3 of 18 Old 01-21-2013, 01:16 AM
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My wife came round behind me while I was lying on the bed. She saw the first pic and gasped because she thought I was looking at ****. She has sheepishly gone to the kitchen now lol

Yes looks a bit tragic. Hope you don't do it again.

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post #4 of 18 Old 01-21-2013, 01:39 AM
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I learned a painful lesson this passed fall to keep your fingers well away from a circular saw blade. I hit two of them good and ended up with 10 stitches. Luckily, no lost length, no bones or tendons hit, just flesh only at the tips. It all healed, left minor scars, and reduced feeling that's slowly coming back. I took pictures but never posted them or told about it until now from shear shame. I knew better than to rip a 1x4 using a circular saw, especially at full blade depth. Now that it's healed and obviously not going to cripple me, I'll tell the story so someone else can learn and hopefully avoid my foolish mistake. It was getting dark and we were trying to get just a bit more work done for the day. You know what happens when you get in a hurry. I can't stress enough that any job involving power tools requires an abundance of patience and paying attention to details.

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post #5 of 18 Old 01-21-2013, 01:51 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the info Doc. I have been keeping it clean with soap and water and covered it when I was in the shop. At first I really didn't feel the pain. I'm thinking shock kicked it. I was kinda numb and just looking at it thinking how freaking lucky I was. And yes. I've learned my lesson. If it looks too small to fit in the planer. Don't try it. I'm chalking it up as pure dumb luck nothing serious happened. Coulda been was worse indeed.
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post #6 of 18 Old 01-21-2013, 02:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duncancruiser View Post
Thanks for the info Doc. I have been keeping it clean with soap and water and covered it when I was in the shop. At first I really didn't feel the pain. I'm thinking shock kicked it. I was kinda numb and just looking at it thinking how freaking lucky I was. And yes. I've learned my lesson. If it looks too small to fit in the planer. Don't try it. I'm chalking it up as pure dumb luck nothing serious happened. Coulda been was worse indeed.
Just after an injury your body releases endorphins that limit pain. These wear off quickly though and then you often get to be reminded of just how stupid it was to have done what you just did. Case in point.....MINE! It hurt good. I'm not sure if having a brand new thin kerf blade helped or hurt, but I think it might have been worse if it had been a full kerf blade.

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post #7 of 18 Old 01-21-2013, 07:14 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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another advantage of thin kerf blades

Never woulda thought of the one above .....
they take less power when running flesh through the saw....
AND the cut is more narrow , requiring fewer stitches ....
AND healing time is quicker....

any others?

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #8 of 18 Old 01-21-2013, 07:16 AM
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Can you guys give me a quick safety lesson here, what should he have done instead of grabbing a piece of scrap?
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post #9 of 18 Old 01-21-2013, 07:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mavawreck
Can you guys give me a quick safety lesson here, what should he have done instead of grabbing a piece of scrap?
What tool are you using, when you say scrap, do you mean the off-cut

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post #10 of 18 Old 01-21-2013, 07:31 AM
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I think he used the scrap as a pusher

Quote:
Originally Posted by mavawreck View Post
Can you guys give me a quick safety lesson here, what should he have done instead of grabbing a piece of scrap?
That's OK unless the scrap is thinner than the workpiece. Why?
Because a thinner piece will not be controlled by the feed rollers and may flip up into the cutters and get kicked backwards.
When planing shorter stock always bump some same thickness scrap right behind the workpiece to keep the rollers from pressing down on the trailing end and tipping it up into the cutterhead.
Kickback!
It also prevents the snipe when the rollers fall off the end of the workpiece. Just run more pieces than you need if possible and make certain they are long enough...at least 12" or more.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 01-21-2013 at 07:33 AM.
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post #11 of 18 Old 01-21-2013, 07:43 AM
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Originally Posted by mavawreck View Post
Can you guys give me a quick safety lesson here, what should he have done instead of grabbing a piece of scrap?
Shut down the machine and start over prepared.
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post #12 of 18 Old 01-21-2013, 08:21 AM
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Quote:
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Can you guys give me a quick safety lesson here, what should he have done instead of grabbing a piece of scrap?
A person shouldn't run a board through a planer that is shorter than the space between the infeed and outfeed rollers. One roller or the other should be putting pressure on the board at all times. Otherwise the cutter head can lift the board causing it to cut more than it is able so it just kicks back. It's not a safe thing to do but often if a board is long enough to barely reach the outfeed roller running a piece of scrap through can go ahead and push it through. This is what the OP was attempting to do but the board was too short for this purpose and when the board kicked it was like some hit the piece of scrap in his hand with a sledge hammer.
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post #13 of 18 Old 01-21-2013, 08:45 AM
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If you do woodworking get used to the fact that you'll be donating blood at some time or other. A good practice on any procedure is to think it through...before you do. If any part of the procedure seems like it could hurt you or doesn't look safe, re-think it, and change your plans.





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post #14 of 18 Old 01-21-2013, 09:10 AM
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Burn a fattie and drink half a fifth of Jack. Quit Whining. What's next ? Apply for SSDI ?
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post #15 of 18 Old 01-21-2013, 09:28 AM
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Well at least it only hurts one time. Lol
I think you were trying to be one with the wood
Blood wood that is. Be careful man!!!

When it's rustic......it's rustic
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post #16 of 18 Old 01-21-2013, 12:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mavawreck View Post
Can you guys give me a quick safety lesson here, what should he have done instead of grabbing a piece of scrap?
At the point he noticed that his board stopped feeding because neither feed roller was contacting his work peice, he should've turned off the planer and avoided the business end of it until it stopped, then removed his peice of wood by hand.
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post #17 of 18 Old 01-21-2013, 04:50 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the helpful info. And just to set the record straight. It was my own brain fart. I put the piece of wood on the in tray of the planner and put the push stick up to the piece and tried to push the blood wood through. I wasn't 100% sure if it would work or not. But after this piece of extreme stupidity on my part I'll never do that again.
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post #18 of 18 Old 01-21-2013, 06:25 PM
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Now you are going to hand plane it... with bandaid
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