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-   -   Out of date glue. (https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/out-date-glue-202130/)

hawkeye10 05-06-2018 06:54 AM

Out of date glue.
 
There is a hardware store near me and I knew they had some Tite Bond hide glue. I found that the glue was dated 2016 so that is 2 years out of date. I showed to the guy that does the ordering and he said it came in from the warehouse that way and I believe him trust me. So that got me to wondering about the other glue. I lot of the codes on the glue you can't read because it's a secret. :wink: Is this something your worried about or do you have a special place you buy glue from?

All I want is to buy fresh glue and not have to throw it out.

silvertonebetty 05-06-2018 06:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hawkeye10 (Post 1964634)
There is a hardware store near me and I knew they had some Tite Bond hide glue. I found that the glue was dated 2016 so that is 2 years out of date. I showed to the guy that does the ordering and he said it came in from the warehouse that way and I believe him trust me. So that got me to wondering about the other glue. I lot of the codes on the glue you can't read because it's a secret. :wink: Is this something your worried about or do you have a special place you buy glue from?



All I want is to buy fresh glue and not have to throw it out.



All that means is you can no longer eat it lol


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Steve Neul 05-06-2018 07:50 AM

A lot depends on how the glue was stored if it is still good or not but they don't have an expiration date for nothing. I wouldn't use it. It may have sat most of it's life in a hot warehouse.

hawkeye10 05-06-2018 08:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steve Neul (Post 1964714)
A lot depends on how the glue was stored if it is still good or not but they don't have an expiration date for nothing. I wouldn't use it. It may have sat most of it's life in a hot warehouse.

So Steve where do you buy glue that you think is fresh?

Steve Neul 05-06-2018 08:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hawkeye10 (Post 1964730)
So Steve where do you buy glue that you think is fresh?

Anyplace that sells a volume of materials would be better. A little hardware store or lumber company is likely to have things like glue and caulk sit on the shelf for a year or more before they get a fresh order. I usually shop at a small lumber company like that which has a box store next door. I buy building materials from them but I've found that chemical products are usually old. Even things like masking tape you can tell is old. I go to the box stores for chemical products. If nothing else you might use walmart. They might not sell so much of these type products but the store is climate controlled and these products don't spend much time in a warehouse. They have enough stores to keep up their inventory they are more likely to get a fresh order from the factory. My little lumber company I think only has 20 stores.

Terry Q 05-06-2018 08:41 AM

Quote:

Our literature states the shelf life of all of our glues as one year. Titebond Liquid Hide Glue includes an expiration date on the bottle, because it can progressively lose its ability to dry hard, and this change is not visually obvious. Titebond Polyurethane Glue has a one year shelf life in an unopened container, but is useable as long as the glue remains fluid. Polyurethanes, however, are designed to react when exposed to moisture and can sometimes begin to cure after the bottle has been opened, and solidify. Most of our yellow and white glues, including Titebond Original and Titebond II, remain usable beyond two years. Should Titebond Original become thick and stringy, or Titebond II turns into an orange colored gel, these changes signify that the glue is no longer usable. The minimum shelf life of Titebond III is stated as one year, when stored appropriately at room temperature. Titebond III is expected to last beyond its stated shelf life. If thickened, shake vigorously by firml


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.

pro70z28 05-06-2018 09:25 AM

I almost always buy glue in smaller bottles. Not so much for the age of the glue (although it sounds like that should be a consideration) but because the bottle gets nasty with dried glue on the outside of the tip (which can usually be pealed off, but also gumming up the tip inside). I don't spend a lot of time messing around with keeping the tip pristine after every use. Easier to buy small bottles and pitch them more often.

hawkeye10 05-06-2018 01:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pro70z28 (Post 1964754)
I almost always buy glue in smaller bottles. Not so much for the age of the glue (although it sounds like that should be a consideration) but because the bottle gets nasty with dried glue on the outside of the tip (which can usually be pealed off, but also gumming up the tip inside). I don't spend a lot of time messing around with keeping the tip pristine after every use. Easier to buy small bottles and pitch them more often.

I buy dental picks on Ebay to clean glue tips out. I also use dental picks for a lot of other things. They are cheap and come in handy.

sweensdv 05-06-2018 05:10 PM

Glue is so cheap that taking the risk of using bad glue just isn't worth it considering what the main purpose of glue is used for.

GeorgeC 05-06-2018 07:44 PM

I have never even looked for an expiration date on a glue bottle. When it gets too thick I do not use it.

George

Toolman50 05-06-2018 08:15 PM

The Big Box stores turn their inventories faster than a ma and pa store.
For things where shelf life is important, this is something to keep in mind.
For everything else, I like to buy from independents when I can.

silvertonebetty 05-06-2018 08:26 PM

To be honest with my personal experience working at a grocery store I personally wouldnít touch anything with a fancy code. There was product with one of those code and the customer returned it because it was mouldy and smelly . Iíve never saw anything so nasty


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IowaDave 05-07-2018 12:32 PM

FWIW, I spoke with a serious woodworker a few years ago that told me that he would purpose to buy his wood glue during certain times of the year only...so as to avoid the possibility that if it was a fresh batch that was shipped in the winter time it might have sat on a dock, inside a semi and/or in a cold warehouse during a time of the year when it could be exposed to freezing temps. He took the expiration, and exposure to cold temps, very seriously.

JamesTinKS 05-07-2018 04:16 PM

If it is Titebond.

How Do I Read The Lot Numbers?
Our current lot numbering system is a 10 digit code. The format is: aymmddbat#. The "a" stands for Made in the U.S.A. The "y" is the last digit of the year of manufacture. Digits "mm" represent the month, and "dd" represent the day of the month. The final four digits represent the batch number used for quality control purposes. Therefore, a product with the lot number A104270023 was manufactured on April 27, 2011.

http://www.titebond.com/frequently_asked_questions.aspx

Catpower 05-07-2018 05:58 PM

When I was running my own company I took about a 20 year hiatus from wood working, it wasn't Titebond hide glue, but I had an unopened gallon of Titebond I it worked as good as fresh glue and I am pretty sure it was frozen a time or two, but it might not have been frozen solid, but it was like new

Knowing how some companies like to have customers rotate the stock for them they might have added some inert ingredient to cause the glue to give it a set shelf life, if it goes bad in 2 years instead of 20 they will sell more glue

Kind of like some things have built in obsolesance, it is going to crap out right after the warranty is up LOL

GeorgeC 05-07-2018 07:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by IowaDave (Post 1965346)
FWIW, I spoke with a serious woodworker a few years ago that told me that he would purpose to buy his wood glue during certain times of the year only...so as to avoid the possibility that if it was a fresh batch that was shipped in the winter time it might have sat on a dock, inside a semi and/or in a cold warehouse during a time of the year when it could be exposed to freezing temps. He took the expiration, and exposure to cold temps, very seriously.

A lot of people take very picayune issues as a major problem. Does not mean anybody else has to.

George
i

NoThankyou 05-08-2018 12:53 AM

I acquired a gallon bottle of Tite Bond when living in Delaware, Ohio. It was stored and used in an unheated garage. The Tite Bond was frozen at least once. I moved to Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. The glue moved with me. The glue was used and stored in an almost heated garage. I moved to Huntington Beach, California and the glue followed. In this garage the glue did not have a chance of freezing.

The first year we rented the house and I did no woodworking as there wasn't enough electricity in the garage. After one year I did buy the house and in another 6 months or so I got power for my RAS so I could start woodworking again.

About a decade from purchase date the gallon was used up so I bought a new gallon bottle of Tite Bond. That first bottle of Tite Bond worked exceptionally well to the last drop. Yes, it had thickened a bit by the end but it still worked well.

I'm sure that the people at Franklin cringe when reading this but it is the way it was.

Steve Neul 05-08-2018 08:14 AM

Has any of you went to fill a bottle of glue from a gallon bottle of glue and had to stop because it had a long stringy clump in the glue which you had to dispose of. This is the affect freezing has on PVA glue. This is really the only problem with having glue freeze.

Tool Agnostic 05-08-2018 12:12 PM

I buy smallish bottles of Titebond III. They are still the flat shape, but one size larger than the smallest bottle. When they get around two years old they have 1/3 or less and start getting thick. That's when I throw the old bottle away and buy a new one.

I use Titebond III because:

* It makes effective strong joints.
* It is food safe.
* It is waterproof when fully cured.
* It gives a slightly longer working time than Titebond I or II.

One drawback is that Titebond III dries with a yellow/amber tint to it. The other versions dry more clear. That's okay for me, but others may object.

Compared with the cost of tools and wood, glue doesn't cost enough that I can't afford to keep reasonably fresh glue on hand. My woodworking activities have increased a lot, so I may start buying larger quantities of Titebond III or experiment with other glues. Either way, I don't like it when the glue is thick and difficult to get out of the bottle. Old glue holds well enough once I get it out of the bottle and spread appropriately, but I suspect that it is a much weaker bond than fresh glue. It is strong enough to hold for everything I have done so far, but I have more advanced projects in mind that would benefit from the strongest glue, so I will stay with the fresh stuff.

Thanks to @JamesTinKS for posting the Titebond date code info. It is very helpful.


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