Newbie Question - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 8Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 26 Old 04-25-2019, 11:08 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 13
View Zatara's Photo Album My Photos
Newbie Question

Hello all. I'm kinda new to the hobby and learning every time I work on something. I'm currently working on a project making a rustic flag. The Union portion I order comes at a height of 10.5" It is intended to be joined to the 7 1x 2 stripes.

In theory the 10.5" union should match right up with the 7 1 x 2 stripes. I've done two using these ordered Unions and each time they are about 1/8" off. I can use a straight router bit to clean it up easy enough but it does mean its off a little.

This seems like simple arithmetic but I'm obviously getting something wrong. Is the glue between the 1 x 2s enough to create this difference? Feels like a dumb question but been staring at this all night and can't figure it out. Apologies if the answer is easy and staring me in the face.

Thanks
Jay C. White Cloud likes this.
Zatara is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 26 Old 04-25-2019, 11:22 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 4,894
View FrankC's Photo Album My Photos
Your 1x2's may be a tad wider than 1.5", the glue lines should not increase the width by 1/8". How does it line up before you glue it up, you may have to trim each of the 1x2's to fit with a hand plane.
Jay C. White Cloud likes this.

“Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth.”
― Marcus Aurelius
FrankC
http://sawdustmaking.com
FrankC is online now  
post #3 of 26 Old 04-25-2019, 11:25 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 13
View Zatara's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks will give that a look in the morning. Would running it through the table saw to just trim it down work or is that overkill?
Jay C. White Cloud likes this.
Zatara is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 26 Old 04-25-2019, 11:31 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 4,894
View FrankC's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zatara View Post
Thanks will give that a look in the morning. Would running it through the table saw to just trim it down work or is that overkill?
Not at all, that would probably be the easiest solution.
Jay C. White Cloud likes this.

“Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth.”
― Marcus Aurelius
FrankC
http://sawdustmaking.com
FrankC is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to FrankC For This Useful Post:
Zatara (04-25-2019)
post #5 of 26 Old 04-27-2019, 06:00 AM
Senior Member
 
ducbsa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Virginia
Posts: 347
View ducbsa's Photo Album My Photos
Are you including the width of the cut in your calculations? For instance, when I want to rip a 4 x 8 sheet to make four equal 12" shelves, I set my fence at 11-7/8" or so. Not 12", but they are equal.
ducbsa is offline  
post #6 of 26 Old 04-27-2019, 02:24 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 13
View Zatara's Photo Album My Photos
For the moment I'm not making any cuts. The Union comes to order and then the 1 x 2s are already cut. I'm starting a new flag tonight and will be running all the 1 x 2s through the table saw before hand. I'm also building a jig to help keep things square as they glue up.

So the I do the table saw, do I set the rip fence at exactly 1.5" or do I need to account for the blade kerf? SO maybe 1 and 5/8" instead? Like I said, pretty new to this.
Zatara is offline  
post #7 of 26 Old 04-27-2019, 03:22 PM
Wood machinist
 
difalkner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: NW Louisiana
Posts: 3,232
View difalkner's Photo Album My Photos
If you're wanting to end up with 1 1/2" wide pieces then that's the distance you'll set from the inside of the blade to your fence. Show us some photos of what you're working on, it sounds pretty neat.

David

David

Curly Wood Shop on Etsy
David Falkner - Woodworking YouTube channel
Our music at church - current videos Airline Baptist BC Facebook Live
Romans 3:23
difalkner is offline  
post #8 of 26 Old 04-27-2019, 03:25 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 13
View Zatara's Photo Album My Photos
Here's a couple I'm working on.

Newbie Question-img_5576.jpg

Name:  image.png
Views: 64
Size:  210.8 KB

Newbie Question-57159984_745628505832647_1398477158719946752_n.jpg
difalkner and Tool Agnostic like this.

Last edited by difalkner; 04-27-2019 at 03:35 PM. Reason: rotate photo
Zatara is offline  
post #9 of 26 Old 04-27-2019, 03:26 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 13
View Zatara's Photo Album My Photos
Evidently the first Marine Corp one is in distress. Can't figure out how to flip it.
Zatara is offline  
post #10 of 26 Old 04-27-2019, 03:36 PM
Wood machinist
 
difalkner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: NW Louisiana
Posts: 3,232
View difalkner's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zatara View Post
Evidently the first Marine Corp one is in distress. Can't figure out how to flip it.
Back in good form! Those look really nice! I really need to do some of those, I've been asked a few times but just haven't done one yet.

David

David

Curly Wood Shop on Etsy
David Falkner - Woodworking YouTube channel
Our music at church - current videos Airline Baptist BC Facebook Live
Romans 3:23
difalkner is offline  
post #11 of 26 Old 04-27-2019, 03:40 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 13
View Zatara's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks for fixing it. Wouldn't want folks to be worried LOL.

Thanks I like making them. I am looking for a way to raise funds for a hike I'm doing in June and I figure these are easy to make and people like buying them. I send all the profits to the CF Foundation. Fun for me and I'm learning each time I make one.
Zatara is offline  
post #12 of 26 Old 04-27-2019, 04:17 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 13
View Zatara's Photo Album My Photos
In furtherance of the project, I'm looking to start the next one but have one with the poly drying. Any suggestions for how to protect it from dust. Outside is not an option due to weather and I can't put it in any other room due to the vapors. It may be that patience is key in this case.
Zatara is offline  
post #13 of 26 Old 04-27-2019, 07:34 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 4,894
View FrankC's Photo Album My Photos
Patience is always key, it is a good idea to do a dry fit before any glue up. You are lucky, us guys up north have to contend with a maple leaf to make a flag.

“Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth.”
― Marcus Aurelius
FrankC
http://sawdustmaking.com
FrankC is online now  
post #14 of 26 Old 04-27-2019, 08:15 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 13
View Zatara's Photo Album My Photos
That's funny. Wind settled and took one outside and put the other together. Running the stripes through the table saw worked perfectly.
Zatara is offline  
post #15 of 26 Old 04-27-2019, 09:48 PM
Timber Wright-Guide
 
Jay C. White Cloud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: New England
Posts: 1,464
View Jay C. White Cloud's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zatara View Post
That's funny. Wind settled and took one outside and put the other together. Running the stripes through the table saw worked perfectly.
Hello Zatara,

Really like the first flag...but I have bias for the Marine Corp...LOL.....Great Job!!!

As to a good, highly durable and easy finish you may consider a tradtional oil finish perhaps? No issues with fumes or worrying about dust and such things...

I've used Heritage Finishes on my projects for decades.

I've also seen (and have used) small copper flashing tops/mini roofs on such projects as well It adds a nice flair and also further increases durability to them long term if left outside.

Let me know if I can expand on any details...

j

Tosa Tomo Designs
Confucius (551 BCE): "I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand..." "...Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance..." Socrates:“I cannot teach anybody anything. I can only help them think..."
Stephen Covey:"Seek to understand, before seeking to be understood..."
Jay C. White Cloud is offline  
post #16 of 26 Old 04-27-2019, 09:55 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 13
View Zatara's Photo Album My Photos
Thanks Jay. Do those give as high gloss a finish as say a polyurethane would do? I'd be curious to try them on future projects either way.

Speaking of polyurethane. The directions say light sanding in between layers. I get a bit nervous sanding the first poly layer as I worry about scratching off the stain or some of the burn nuances in the process. So I used a 400 grit sanding block and that seemed to work okay. Just applied the second poly coat and it looks pretty decent. Is 400 being too cautious or about right?

Thanks

Last edited by Zatara; 04-27-2019 at 09:59 PM.
Zatara is offline  
post #17 of 26 Old 04-27-2019, 10:33 PM
Timber Wright-Guide
 
Jay C. White Cloud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: New England
Posts: 1,464
View Jay C. White Cloud's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zatara View Post
Thanks Jay. Do those give as high gloss a finish as say a polyurethane would do? I'd be curious to try them on future projects either way.

Speaking of polyurethane. The directions say light sanding in between layers. I get a bit nervous sanding the first poly layer as I worry about scratching off the stain or some of the burn nuances in the process. So I used a 400 grit sanding block and that seemed to work okay. Just applied the second poly coat and it looks pretty decent. Is 400 being too cautious or about right?

Thanks
Hi Zatara,

They tend not to gloss at all for the most part...

As to the "sanding" with 400...your not being too cautions at all. I've sanded with grit as fine as 1000 depending on sheen/gloss I wanted.

Green wood can be made glossy just by the type/style of planing and/or sanding one uses to process it. This "sheen" is not permanent without a finish on it per se depending on wood species and where its kept.

Some folks like the "wet look" and some do not. I've had many clients in both camps. There are ways, with traditional finishes, to achieve or facilitate this also.

What is your preference?

Regards,

j

Tosa Tomo Designs
Confucius (551 BCE): "I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand..." "...Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance..." Socrates:“I cannot teach anybody anything. I can only help them think..."
Stephen Covey:"Seek to understand, before seeking to be understood..."
Jay C. White Cloud is offline  
post #18 of 26 Old 05-07-2019, 04:11 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 13
View Zatara's Photo Album My Photos
Would a lacquer tend to dry faster while still obtaining a shiny gloss finish? Also is there a natural lacquer that would accomplish the goal without all the toxic off gassing?
Zatara is offline  
post #19 of 26 Old 05-07-2019, 07:16 PM
Timber Wright-Guide
 
Jay C. White Cloud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: New England
Posts: 1,464
View Jay C. White Cloud's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zatara View Post
...Would a lacquer tend to dry faster while still obtaining a shiny gloss finish?...
Hi Zatara,

"Faster" is a truly relative thing to all types of variables from chemical formulation (botanical/insect vs petroleum)...ambient temperature...uv exposure...ambient humidity...drying agent employed...just to list some of the key players...

However, if it has to be a..."yes or no"...type answer...???...then to this one I would have to reply no; "a shiny gloss finish" (or lack there of) has little do with this time factor...



Quote:
Originally Posted by Zatara View Post
...Also is there a natural lacquer that would accomplish the goal without all the toxic off gassing?...
I would offer a big yes to that one, but will more than own my a very strong bias toward not only the industries that produce most "modern finishes," but what/how there made as well.

I can virtually guarantee (as they are formulated now) your not going to find a "modern lacquer" 1000 feet under the ocean for 100 years on a elm wood tray and tea set, being of much value in either its aesthetics or is structural integrity...On the other hand several of the Asian botanical based Lacquering modalities have been found centuries later in the Sea of Japan that appeared almost new in condition when cleaned. Some of these artifact specimens had been damage in the wreck to the point that the wood underneath was exposed to the organisms of the sea that feed on wood...What was left?...a perfectly intact Lacquer shell...

As to safe...???...I must share that some individuals to have dermal reactions to some of these traditional finishes. One species of Japan lacquer (漆器 Shikki - 漆塗 Uurushi-nuri ) is made from a plant related to distant cousin of "Poison Ivy." For those of us that don't even get Poison Ivy, this is not an issue, for those that are hyper sensitive, working with the raw lacquer will require protective gloves and some even a mask. Both is good practice anyway, no matter the finish modality...

Let me know if I can expand on anything?

j

Tosa Tomo Designs
Confucius (551 BCE): "I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand..." "...Real knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance..." Socrates:“I cannot teach anybody anything. I can only help them think..."
Stephen Covey:"Seek to understand, before seeking to be understood..."

Last edited by Jay C. White Cloud; 05-07-2019 at 07:19 PM.
Jay C. White Cloud is offline  
post #20 of 26 Old 05-08-2019, 10:55 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 13
View Zatara's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay C. White Cloud View Post
Hi Zatara,

"Faster" is a truly relative thing to all types of variables from chemical formulation (botanical/insect vs petroleum)...ambient temperature...uv exposure...ambient humidity...drying agent employed...just to list some of the key players...

However, if it has to be a..."yes or no"...type answer...???...then to this one I would have to reply no; "a shiny gloss finish" (or lack there of) has little do with this time factor...





I would offer a big yes to that one, but will more than own my a very strong bias toward not only the industries that produce most "modern finishes," but what/how there made as well.

I can virtually guarantee (as they are formulated now) your not going to find a "modern lacquer" 1000 feet under the ocean for 100 years on a elm wood tray and tea set, being of much value in either its aesthetics or is structural integrity...On the other hand several of the Asian botanical based Lacquering modalities have been found centuries later in the Sea of Japan that appeared almost new in condition when cleaned. Some of these artifact specimens had been damage in the wreck to the point that the wood underneath was exposed to the organisms of the sea that feed on wood...What was left?...a perfectly intact Lacquer shell...

As to safe...???...I must share that some individuals to have dermal reactions to some of these traditional finishes. One species of Japan lacquer (漆器 Shikki - 漆塗 Uurushi-nuri ) is made from a plant related to distant cousin of "Poison Ivy." For those of us that don't even get Poison Ivy, this is not an issue, for those that are hyper sensitive, working with the raw lacquer will require protective gloves and some even a mask. Both is good practice anyway, no matter the finish modality...

Let me know if I can expand on anything?

j
Thanks. If you were limited to the Home Depot is there anything you'd recommend for a gloss finish that is also from natural relatively non-toxic ingredients? I'm looking to pick it up tomorrow for some projects some folks are waiting on.
Zatara is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Newbie Question Vasilios General Woodworking Discussion 7 12-10-2018 01:51 AM
Newbie Question Gray035 General Woodworking Discussion 6 09-28-2016 10:53 PM
Newbie question: re-gluing antique chair Mike_M General Woodworking Discussion 5 03-29-2016 02:28 PM
Newbie question: letting wood dry dyland123 Forestry & Milling 8 03-28-2016 04:52 AM
Newbie question on building a desk mpalazola General Woodworking Discussion 10 09-23-2015 12:59 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome