Newbie Question - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 8 Old 12-06-2018, 10:39 AM Thread Starter
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Newbie Question

Hey guys sorry if this is a really basic question, but I'm really new to woodworking. I have begun my first project, a work bench. With that being said I chose a plan that has some lap joints, dowel work and glue is used primarily for joinery.

My problem
I have used two 2*4s glued together for the legs of the table, problem being is I did not have enough clamps to properly clamp down the legs. The result were gaps where the glue has seeped out.

My question
Can I use fasteners after I have glued or is it advised to recut new legs and fasten and glue at the same time ?

Thank you guys, once again very new to this but I have enjoyed every step. Looking forward I cannot replicate the process by the Youtuber as he has the proper amount of clamps t finish this project, I will have to use different means to fasten my glue work. Pics provided please be gentle, and thank you !
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post #2 of 8 Old 12-06-2018, 11:45 AM
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I would say to start over, if you are short of clamps glue and screw the 2X4's together. You need to select the sides you glue together, if there is a slight bow put the two high faces together, that way only two clamps on the ends should force the boards tight and it will naturally straighten out.

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post #3 of 8 Old 12-08-2018, 08:14 AM
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I agree with Frank. Start over with new lumber. For rough projects where appearance doesn't matter, I glue and screw. I keep everything long and cut to length after the glue dries. I also have a good amount of C clamps for such work. They can be gotten much cheaper than the fancy wood clamps. No need to feel silly asking basic questions. Everybody starts out as a rookie! Welcome to the forum!

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post #4 of 8 Old 12-09-2018, 12:12 AM
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Let me introduce you the world of woodworking where there are more then 1 way to skin a cat. Frank and Brian are both correct but I disagree with them. Since you're new too woodworking, keep your mistake and add a few screws to the legs. Your workbench doesn't need too look good... it only needs to be functional!


Your choice of a workbench is an excellent choice for your 1st project. Keep in mind you're new too woodworking so start learning too live with your "newbie" mistakes. All workshop projects are great learning tools because they simply need to be functional, not pretty. I have kept a few "original" workshop items I built many years ago and they are still functional. They are also visual reminders of how far I have progressed...


Also, your 1st workbench will not be your last. It may be the base for future workbenches, but as you learn and evolve as a woodworker, your needs and "workbench" desires will change along with your skills.



One last advise... keep as many cut-offs as possible. They are a great resource for learning joinery...
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post #5 of 8 Old 12-09-2018, 05:59 AM
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Fix them and keep them IF .....

If you can spread the gaps open far enough to force some additional glue, I'd keep them. I've heard of using a shop vac on the back side to draw the glue down into the gap. It may mess up you vac attachment, but it can be cleaned immediately after you use it. Then apply your clamps as soon as practical to force the gap closed.

Pretty VS functional.
Most construction lumber these days comes with the edges rounded over. This prevents splinters when handling it, but leaves unsightly gaps when you glue two pieces together. It is a real pain to remove the small radii on the table saw or thickness planer, BUT some guys like the look better....it's a choice, since it won't affect the strength only the looks. On a hardwood leg there will be no radiused corners since you will have milled them to the finished dimension. But you can also radius them afterward depending on the look you want. In one case you remove them in the other you add them back on....

Making lap joints and mortises without chiseling ...HUH? There are many places on a workbench where you want a lap joint or a large mortise for a cross member. I made these small mockup benches to study the different ways to make them by staggering the pieces rather than sawing the material away after the glue up:
https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f9/w...mock-up-21997/
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post #6 of 8 Old 12-09-2018, 06:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BernieL View Post
Let me introduce you the world of woodworking where there are more then 1 way to skin a cat. Frank and Brian are both correct but I disagree with them. Since you're new too woodworking, keep your mistake and add a few screws to the legs. Your workbench doesn't need too look good... it only needs to be functional!


Your choice of a workbench is an excellent choice for your 1st project. Keep in mind you're new too woodworking so start learning too live with your "newbie" mistakes. All workshop projects are great learning tools because they simply need to be functional, not pretty. I have kept a few "original" workshop items I built many years ago and they are still functional. They are also visual reminders of how far I have progressed...


Also, your 1st workbench will not be your last. It may be the base for future workbenches, but as you learn and evolve as a woodworker, your needs and "workbench" desires will change along with your skills.



One last advise... keep as many cut-offs as possible. They are a great resource for learning joinery...

I a agree with this post. This is your first project. It is likely that you are going to make additional mistakes as you continue to build this workbench. Finish the workbench and learn from your mistakes.


Sometime later you will have increased skills and can build a workbench that is more pleasing to the eye.


George
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post #7 of 8 Old 12-09-2018, 06:27 AM
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You could use screws after the fact and it would structurally be alright but wouldn't look very nice. If it were me I would purchase 4x4's for the legs.
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post #8 of 8 Old 12-10-2018, 01:51 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you gentlemen for the feedback, I am realizing more and more I need to slow down and enjoy the process as most of my stakes have been not sitting back and thinking about the approach. I will most likely keep going with the original build and learn from every mistake, which there will be many, haha (I already made a lap joint a little too big). If I'm brave enough I'll post pics of the frankenstein project.
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Last edited by Vasilios; 12-10-2018 at 01:52 AM. Reason: spelling
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