New Workshop Tools - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 13 Old 01-18-2020, 01:31 AM Thread Starter
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Question New Workshop Tools

So I am brand new and want to setup a workshop in my garage. I am cleaning everything out of my 2.5 car garage that I havenít used since I moved in and have a ton of space to fill, but I need recommendations on what tools to fill it with. My budget is 1-2K, but I can go up to 3-4.

I have a delta 10 inch compound miter saw, dewalt 10 inch circular saw, black and decker jigsaw, black and decker power drills/screwdrivers, and some clamps. other random tools that a homeowner picks up after 15 years as well. I also have a 15 gallon shop vac I was planning on using for dust collection.

Tools I think I will need, table saw, router (not sure plunge or fixed), random orbital sander (donít like the sander I have now, its square and the sheets of sandpaper just slide right out). Oh yea and I want a lathe and appropriate starting chisels to go with it.

I know there is a lot more I am missing and I hope you can help me out
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post #2 of 13 Old 01-18-2020, 02:01 AM
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I'm a fan of buying tools as I need them rather than building a collection first. It's also difficult to recommend anything without knowing what you're planning to do. Have you considered taking a course to get more familiar with tools so you can better choose what will suit you? Tool choice can be very personal, as there is no "best" of anything (aside for maybe Festool).

I'd recommend finishing out and painting the garage first. You'll have a nicer work area and better light.
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post #3 of 13 Old 01-18-2020, 09:12 AM
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I love helping spend others money but I am in agreement with MEP1 on buying as you need. With your budget and starting out you have couple choices.New or used which over the yrs my route was used and auction site. In my shop some of my first projects were to build cabinets for my tools with working counter tops. If the internet and Craigs list been around I would have purchase all used rolling tool cabinets.I would have remove the casters and fix them in place all at the same level,then make myself a solid working surface as the top. There are so many Youtubes out there to give ideals on table saw outfeed tables with cabinets underneath or making yourself a fix TS workstation. TS and BS and even DP I see on CL all the time,some are junk and some or good.But like most woodworking home shops the TS is the hub of most shops so invest wisely. Good luck,buy the best that your budget allows cause cheap tools can be fustrating I know. But also like myself I have upgraded over the yrs as I come across better quality in used tool market. And keep the pics coming
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post #4 of 13 Old 01-18-2020, 12:48 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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Well, lucky you .....!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Heilman View Post
So I am brand new and want to setup a workshop in my garage. I am cleaning everything out of my 2.5 car garage that I havenít used since I moved in and have a ton of space to fill, but I need recommendations on what tools to fill it with. My budget is 1-2K, but I can go up to 3-4.

I have a delta 10 inch compound miter saw, dewalt 10 inch circular saw, black and decker jigsaw, black and decker power drills/screwdrivers, and some clamps. other random tools that a homeowner picks up after 15 years as well. I also have a 15 gallon shop vac I was planning on using for dust collection.

Tools I think I will need, table saw, router (not sure plunge or fixed), random orbital sander (donít like the sander I have now, its square and the sheets of sandpaper just slide right out). Oh yea and I want a lathe and appropriate starting chisels to go with it.

I know there is a lot more I am missing and I hope you can help me out

Woodturning is almost a separate hobby all to itself. Once you get started it can take over your entire life ... or so they say. So, go big or don't go yet.
You have a 10" Dewalt circular saw oh my gosh! How did that purchase come to be? That should be able to cut 4" X 4" no problems. Build a deck, did you?

If you are buying NEW then I highly recommend Grizzly Industrial for you woodworking machines and the woodturning lathe. I own or have owner 6 different models from Grizzly and they were all great. Best bang for the buck I know of.

Used machines require a wary purchaser with some knowledge of bearing noises, wear points etc. Bearing are about the cheapest repair out there. They are factory coded as to shaft and bore size, so no mystery when it comes to buying replacements.

Other issues like wear, result in loose trunnions or sliding ways, but typically a tightening of the gibs screws is the cure. Worn drill press bearings result in runout, but again are pretty simple to replace if you are mechanically inclined.


Lucky You!
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #5 of 13 Old 01-18-2020, 06:05 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MEP1 View Post
I'm a fan of buying tools as I need them rather than building a collection first. It's also difficult to recommend anything without knowing what you're planning to do. Have you considered taking a course to get more familiar with tools so you can better choose what will suit you? Tool choice can be very personal, as there is no "best" of anything (aside for maybe Festool).

I'd recommend finishing out and painting the garage first. You'll have a nicer work area and better light.
That does make sense. My plans include outside furniture, fixing my shed up (new doors), some dressers/cabinets in the house and the basement.

I had not really considered better lighting in the garage, that is how it always has been and I just got used to it, but that would make a lot of sense. Maybe some led lighting strips instead of the drop down lights I have there. Ultimately I will re-mud the drywall and paint it (previous owner did a horrible job) but that is down on my list of stuff to do until I am using the workshop more.
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post #6 of 13 Old 01-18-2020, 06:06 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Woodturning is almost a separate hobby all to itself. Once you get started it can take over your entire life ... or so they say. So, go big or don't go yet.
You have a 10" Dewalt circular saw oh my gosh! How did that purchase come to be? That should be able to cut 4" X 4" no problems. Build a deck, did you?

Lucky You!
Sorry that was a typo, it was late, its a 7 1/4 circular saw.
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post #7 of 13 Old 01-18-2020, 06:54 PM
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If I was in your position, I would buy a table saw and a trim router with flush trim and round over bits and set up everything else I currently owned. If you build a fixed miter station make sure you have enough space in case you want a bigger or newer saw.

As recommended above, shop cabinets and work surfaces along with a router table would be my first projects.

I would start the research on the lathe and a more powerful router for the router table. Also, I would look at all the battery powered hand tools and decide on a platform. No sense having multiple battery platforms. Look at Dewalt or Milwaukee or Makita or the myriad of other brands and decide based on price and available tools if it fits your needs.

If you build a fixed bench, use the space above it for cabinets an the space below it for drawers and cabinets.

Don't fill all the wall and floor space yet. Wait until you have used the shop for a while to decide what you ultimately want. It does sort of suck to rip down something you just built because it wasn't planned well enough.

Plan where the compressor will go. You will eventually buy a compressor. A good pancake can be had for around $100. and is a great place to start.

So many things go into setting up a shop. Just decide is it going to be almost exclusively a woodworking shop, or a real DIY shop geared to a lot of things.

It's your shop, have fun with the set up process.

One other thing, rolling bases are your friend.
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Last edited by subroc; 01-18-2020 at 06:58 PM.
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post #8 of 13 Old 01-18-2020, 08:35 PM
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Just remember... it's like building a house, it starts with a foundation. I wish I had painted my walls before I started covering the walls. I wish I had a bigger compressor so I could use more air tools. A good work table and the rest will come...
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post #9 of 13 Old 01-18-2020, 09:17 PM
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What a beautiful space for a shop. You are so lucky to have that much room. To me, one of the most important tools to buy is a heater and an air conditioner. I run my heat and cooling units 24 hours a day, depending on the season. Sunday night it's going to get down to 17* but Monday mourning I can go to the shop be comfortable.
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Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
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post #10 of 13 Old 01-19-2020, 02:03 AM
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I don't know your age, but if this is going to be many year or life long endeavor, make your shop as bright as possible and spend some bucks on a decent air compressor. You'll be glad you did. BTW when you're my age, you can't possibly have too much light. Good luck and welcome to the club.
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post #11 of 13 Old 01-19-2020, 11:39 AM
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There is a lot of great advice here, and I can't add much to what the experts above have said.

Nobody mentioned a drill press as an early tool to buy. Despite the fact that my drill press is horrible in so many ways, I use it often. I can't imagine a woodshop without a drill press.

Emphasizing what others have already said:

* Think about the infrastructure of your shop first: Good lighting, cabinets and storage, dust collection, etc. I don't have to think about heating or cooling, but others do.
* Buy tools as you need them.
* Consider making your tools mobile. It adds cost, but gives you a lot flexibility now and in the future.

One of the best resources for used tools, wood, and helpful advice is a local woodworking club. They are especially good for used tools. The seller has a reputation to uphold in the club and wants to see the tool go to the hands of someone who will use it and maybe cherish it.

Start now and keep an eye on your local Craigslist or local Facebook marketplace. Real bargains appear from time to time, and you want to learn and know your local market so that you are ready for when the perfect deal comes along.
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post #12 of 13 Old 01-19-2020, 01:00 PM
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First thing I would do is paint the walls white, and possibly put in a false ceiling also white, the walls and ceiling as they are will suck up all your light no matter what kind you install.

Don't get in a hurry to acquire tools, get a feel for what you want to do first, that being said if there is a deal too good to pass up grab it, if you find you don't use it you can probably sell it at a profit. Always buy the best tools you can afford, don't be afraid to buy used tools as long as they are in good condition, it is usually a good idea to avoid tools from a commercial shop unless you know the history. Estate sales are a good place to pick up tools, both large and small.
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post #13 of 13 Old 01-19-2020, 02:04 PM
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I have bought two of these lights, one for the garage and one for above the panel saw in the basement
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

a radial arm saw off of craigslist for 100-150, a good table saw preferably sawstop, 6" jointer, bigger if you can afford it,
really depends on where your feelings take you as to what you really need. good quality tools make life easier however goods quality furniture has been built with low end tools, just a lot more patience, time and skill to do so. skill comes with experience at a different rate for each person

good dust collection of the fine dust, good lighting are necessary for long term health

GOOD LUCK, post back with more comments and pictures as you progress

Ron
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