"NEW" lathe! - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 12 Old 02-22-2013, 08:43 PM Thread Starter
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"NEW" lathe!

I've all told you about Uncle Paul, my 94-year-old great great uncle that was a master craftsman back in his day, and my true inspiration for beginning to woodwork! He has age-related macular degeneration and can't build any more, and after I made him a clock for his 90th birthday he began to pass his tools down to me. Here is my latest acquisition:



It's an older Craftsman and needs a good cleaning, but I'm really excited to get turning!

When I was in wood shop class at age 14 (which was 14 years ago) I turned some oak knobs for a towel rack project. It was really tough. Does anyone have ideas for woods that are maybe just as stable and a little easier on tools that I can practice turning on?

Thanks guys!

Bobby

Bobby
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post #2 of 12 Old 02-22-2013, 08:53 PM
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Turners turn anything you can put on it. Skies the limit. Soft closed grain wood will be some of the easiest. Sharp tools are a big part of success.

Al

Friends don't let friends use stamped metal tools sold at clothing stores.


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post #3 of 12 Old 02-22-2013, 09:15 PM
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Try some poplar to practice on. Softer wood, cuts easy without too much tear out. Also no pitch to deal with like using soft woods.

That bowl was perfect right up until that last cut...
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post #4 of 12 Old 02-22-2013, 09:21 PM
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Poplar is a great practice and beginner wood.
It turns easy and sands and finishes nicely.
Not great colors or grain but a good wood to get the feel of your tools.
Maple is my favorite wood although I have a limited exposure to exotic and other species.
My most common woods from easiest to hardest to turn are :
Poplar
Pine
Cherry
Maple
Black walnut
Beech
Oak
Ash

Learning more about tools everyday
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post #5 of 12 Old 02-22-2013, 10:03 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the replies guys!

Poplar sounds fine to me. Besides simple furniture pieces, I like to build models (like what Kenbo and Buggyman do) so poplar really provides the perfect medium. Little wheels and little tires and little hydraulic cylinders should be perfect for this little lathe!

Bobby
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post #6 of 12 Old 02-22-2013, 10:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Masterofnone View Post
Thanks for the replies guys!

Poplar sounds fine to me. Besides simple furniture pieces, I like to build models (like what Kenbo and Buggyman do) so poplar really provides the perfect medium. Little wheels and little tires and little hydraulic cylinders should be perfect for this little lathe!

Bobby
It's not so much the size as it is the machining.
The machining makes the lathe turn smoother so you get less vibration.
Vibration transfers from the machine to the wood.
Ken and Buggy have some nice tools.
Ken's using the 46-460 which is an ultra smooth running midi.

Learning more about tools everyday
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post #7 of 12 Old 02-22-2013, 10:36 PM Thread Starter
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Well I guess we'll see how bad she shakes when I stick a piece of wood on her!
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post #8 of 12 Old 02-22-2013, 10:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Masterofnone View Post
Well I guess we'll see how bad she shakes when I stick a piece of wood on her!
That's a good start....

Learning more about tools everyday
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post #9 of 12 Old 02-23-2013, 10:41 AM
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I have the exact same lathe! And for my first, I LOVE it...:) Ive been slowly getting more 1MT accessories and its letting me do lots! What i started with to practice n get the hang of was my local Menards, Lowes, etc, had some 2x2 pine lengths..pretty much like two firring strips smacked together...i could get a bundle of them for CHEAP!! So, just cut a piece off, throw it on the lathe, and start gettin a feel for your tools! Hehe
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post #10 of 12 Old 02-23-2013, 11:35 AM
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this should be a fun thread to follow. i just got a similar lathe off CL with a 2 piece CI flat bed rather than a round tube for $30. it's not an ideal lathe, but it is the only major common shop tool i didn't have. i've always been told those tubular lathes weren't any good, so i'm very interested in seeing how the OP does with it.

there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.
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post #11 of 12 Old 02-23-2013, 11:40 AM
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Cleaning up mono-tube lathe

A friend gave me his Craftsman mono tube lathe to pass onto another friend. The lathe has been replaced by a NOVA DVR XP.

My friend mentioned the lathe was noisy and the tailstock difficult to move. I think some of this was a lack of maintenance.

Before sending this on I decided to cleanup the decades of dust, and see what else may need tuning up.

The tube had not been lubricated for awhile, it had small dings and scratches. No wonder the original owner friend complained of difficulty in moving the tail stock.

WD40 and some wet-dry paper to the rescue. In a few seconds all was working smoothly again.

Removed the tailstock and cleaned up the threads. Another part of the lathe which was overdue for lubrication.

Lots of old dust to remove, especially in the motor. An open drip induction motor is going to collect dust from a lathe. A consequence of the inexpensive price point of the lathe.

The pulleys had slipped over time. I had to use a pulley extractor to get them off The lathe pulley had slipped off sufficient the locking screw was not engaging in the machined flat section. It was now on the round section of the shaft.

After re-aligning the pulleys, I re-mounted the motor, attached the belt, and powered up. It is now running as good as new.

The original owner friend commented the lathe was noisy and vibrated a lot. I am not going to try any turning, but I do not feel the no load sound is noisy. I can just hear the hum of the motor.

Perhaps my friend needed to have cleaned this more often.

Good luck with your lathe. I would not want to use my friends lathe even though now running smoothly. The handles are too small.
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post #12 of 12 Old 02-23-2013, 12:03 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Paine View Post
The tube had not been lubricated for awhile, it had small dings and scratches. No wonder the original owner friend complained of difficulty in moving the tail stock.

WD40 and some wet-dry paper to the rescue. In a few seconds all was working smoothly again.

Good luck with your lathe. I would not want to use my friends lathe even though now running smoothly. The handles are too small.
Good to know, as my tail stock is also stuck. The lathe sat in a shed for the last couple of years and needs a good lube as well.

What do you mean the handles are too small?

I probably won't be able to turn anything until sometime Monday, so if you guys can sit tight for a few days, I'll let you know how it goes.
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