New finish nail gun - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 35 Old 07-30-2015, 12:25 AM
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It looks like Bostitch makes more than one 18 ga brad nailer. I have the BT1855K model. It has never jammed. I also saw one in the store that comes with a Bostitch air compressor. Definitely two different animals. Looks different and feels different.

I have used the Bostich nails exclusively.
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post #22 of 35 Old 07-30-2015, 10:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Chamfer View Post
The only thing I'd disagree with from the above ^ is the power claim. I've used all three types and from my experience they all work about the same in that aspect. They all have adjustments that let you set the power where it needs to be and are all capable of setting nails even in hard woods.

Just my experience, other folks experiences will vary.

Most modern nailers have a depth adjustment. This moves the safety on the tool closer or further from the wood, so you can flush drive or counter-sink the nails.
When working with extremely hard woods such as pecan, you may find your nailer does not have the power to fully drive a 2" nail even when the depth adjustment is set to the lowest setting. Example: the tool will counter sink a 1 1/4" nail, flush a 1 1/2" nail, but leaves the 2" nail standing 1/8" proud and unacceptable. With an air tool, you can increase the air pressure (maximum pressure in most cases is 120 psi) to increase the power, but with a battery operated tool, you run at full power all the time with no additional power available.
You notice the power of these tools when you are driving the longer lengths of nails into really hard woods. All tools will work fine in softer woods like pine and cedar.
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post #23 of 35 Old 07-30-2015, 10:29 AM
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Originally Posted by BigJim View Post
Thanks Toolman, we appreciate your expertise.

Are Paslode trim gun nails still sharpened from side to side instead of from front to back? That is the only thing I have against the Paslode trim guns. Nails sharpened from side to side will sometimes run out or follow the gain of the wood and shoot out the side of the trim. To stop the nail from shooting out the side of the trim, hold the gun 90 degrees of the trim.
Nails are cut rather than sharpened. A strip of approximately 25 nails are pulled to length, headed and cut at a rate of about 100 per second.
The tooling for this operation puts the bevel of the cut on the side rather than front to back.
You are correct that the nail wants to naturally follow the grain of the wood. When the nail comes out the side, we call this a "shiner" and no one wants a shiner on your project. When working on something thin like a door jamb, it's common to turn the tool at a 90 degree angle to avoid a shiner. Shiners are caused as much from the soft tensile strength of the wire (all nails are made from wire) as the point configuration. A hardened nail drives better.
Also the gauge of the nail can make a difference in getting a good straight drive. A common Senco nail is their 15 gauge finish nail. A common Paslode nail is 16 gauge. The heavier gauge (15) will drive straighter in most cases. A 2" 18 gauge nail will follow the grain even more.
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post #24 of 35 Old 07-30-2015, 10:38 AM
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Gas fuel cells

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Originally Posted by bigarm View Post
Thanks all of you, especially Toolman for the information. It gives me things to ponder. I will have to check rebuilding it also. I took it apart some what but couldn't get it fully apart to see what is wrong with it. I feel like something is jammed in it, but can't see anything. I had double bad luck that day. Not only did the Rigid stop working, but so did the Paslode 18 gauge that I bought used from someone a month or so ago. When I push down on it, the fan (or whatever it is) makes noise but it won't shoot the nail. I only used it a few times, but it had worked well and was very convenient without having to use the air compressor. I don't understand how 2 could go down in one day. Luckily my cheap Harbor Freight 18 gauge kept on working.
Just a guess here Big Arm, but usually if your fan is working, but the tool won't fire, it's the gas. The gas has a shelf life of about 15 months. The fuel is like a two cycle mix and will go bad in time. Try a new fuel cell and it might work fine. Fuel has an expiration date code on it. Always check the dates because you don't know how long it's been in a warehouse or on the shelf before you buy.
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post #25 of 35 Old 07-30-2015, 10:54 AM Thread Starter
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I will check the date code, but it was purchased in July and worked until the other day. Also, I bought two canisters at the same time and tried the spare with the same result.
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post #26 of 35 Old 07-30-2015, 10:58 AM
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Nail guns

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Originally Posted by bigarm View Post
Toolman: tried to pm you but it says you can't get pm's. Are there certain nailers you recommend?
There are a lot of good nailers on the market, but I still recommend a tool from one of the major mfg. Senco, Paslode, Bostitch or Hitachi.
On the second tier, I think you will be happy with Porter Cable or DeWalt.
Buy the brand that is readily available to you and convenient.
I would not buy a nailer for serious woodworking from HF.
Good luck with your purchase.
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post #27 of 35 Old 07-30-2015, 11:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolman50 View Post
Nails are cut rather than sharpened. A strip of approximately 25 nails are pulled to length, headed and cut at a rate of about 100 per second.
The tooling for this operation puts the bevel of the cut on the side rather than front to back.
You are correct that the nail wants to naturally follow the grain of the wood. When the nail comes out the side, we call this a "shiner" and no one wants a shiner on your project. When working on something thin like a door jamb, it's common to turn the tool at a 90 degree angle to avoid a shiner. Shiners are caused as much from the soft tensile strength of the wire (all nails are made from wire) as the point configuration. A hardened nail drives better.
Also the gauge of the nail can make a difference in getting a good straight drive. A common Senco nail is their 15 gauge finish nail. A common Paslode nail is 16 gauge. The heavier gauge (15) will drive straighter in most cases. A 2" 18 gauge nail will follow the grain even more.
I kinda figured the nails were cut instead of sharpened. Senco nails are cut/sharpened from front to rear, I guess that is the main reason I am partial to Senco.

One thing we did when a nail didn't sink all the way in was to pull the nails in the gun back so a nail would not fire, place the gun over the nail that is sticking out so it goes in the plunger hole and make a dry shot, it will drive the nail the rest of the way in 99% of the time, if the nail has hit another nail, it won't set, it will mess the nail head up by trying to resink it.

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post #28 of 35 Old 07-30-2015, 02:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolman50 View Post
Most modern nailers have a depth adjustment. This moves the safety on the tool closer or further from the wood, so you can flush drive or counter-sink the nails.
When working with extremely hard woods such as pecan, you may find your nailer does not have the power to fully drive a 2" nail even when the depth adjustment is set to the lowest setting. Example: the tool will counter sink a 1 1/4" nail, flush a 1 1/2" nail, but leaves the 2" nail standing 1/8" proud and unacceptable. With an air tool, you can increase the air pressure (maximum pressure in most cases is 120 psi) to increase the power, but with a battery operated tool, you run at full power all the time with no additional power available.
You notice the power of these tools when you are driving the longer lengths of nails into really hard woods. All tools will work fine in softer woods like pine and cedar.


The battery powered ones I was referring to have not just a depth setting adjustment but also a 'power' adjustment, much like adjusting the pressure on a compressor.
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post #29 of 35 Old 07-30-2015, 04:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJim View Post
I kinda figured the nails were cut instead of sharpened. Senco nails are cut/sharpened from front to rear, I guess that is the main reason I am partial to Senco.

One thing we did when a nail didn't sink all the way in was to pull the nails in the gun back so a nail would not fire, place the gun over the nail that is sticking out so it goes in the plunger hole and make a dry shot, it will drive the nail the rest of the way in 99% of the time, if the nail has hit another nail, it won't set, it will mess the nail head up by trying to resink it.
That's about the best way to sink a standing nail. They are almost impossible to counter sink with a hammer and nail set and hard to pull back out.
Painters prefer the 18 gauge because it leaves a very small hole. Easy to hide when finishing.
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post #30 of 35 Old 07-30-2015, 05:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Toolman50 View Post
That's about the best way to sink a standing nail. They are almost impossible to counter sink with a hammer and nail set and hard to pull back out.


Wow.
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post #31 of 35 Old 07-31-2015, 06:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigJim View Post
Why not just rebuild the gun you have now? I used and still use Senco mostly but I have a lot of different brand guns. The only Senco that really let me down is the Accuset 23 gauge headless nail gun by Senco, can't get parts for it. Well, I did use it for 15 years though. LOL

I always rebuild my own guns when they tear up, there really isn't much to it. When I was in business most nail guns were $300 plus, repair was a must.

This here is the best advice someone could ask for if they wish to save a lot of money...

My Paslode F16 is about 20 years old and should last another good while longer...
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post #32 of 35 Old 07-31-2015, 08:49 PM
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This here is the best advice someone could ask for if they wish to save a lot of money...

My Paslode F16 is about 20 years old and should last another good while longer...
The Paslode tools are made for professional use, like many of the other tool brands I've mentioned above. Some tools used on an assembly line in a plant are used hard 8 hours a day, 5 days a week. It's not unusual to find some of these tools going strong after 20 years of use.
Finish carpenters are notorious for not oiling their tools. They don't want an oil spot on unfinished wood. There are several brands now that feature "oiless". But the oiless tools/compressors don't seem to last as long IMO. You have moving parts. Steel striking steel. A little oil can help. The number one and two things that goes wrong with a pneumatic Nailer is the '0' rings and the seals. Both are cheap parts to make a repair.
Also most of the professional grade of tools can be repaired many, many times before they're tossed. The throw-away tools weren't made to be repaired. You just use them until they quit, then toss 'em.
When buying a used nailer, try it out before you buy it. If it drives nails, it might serve you well for many years.
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post #33 of 35 Old 07-31-2015, 09:04 PM
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The last two years have been rough on my aging guns---
I've bought 5 Hitachi guns and so far I am pleased---two framing guns--a small crown stapler and two angled finish nailers--
The finish guns have a push button that lets you use the exhaust port as a blower---At first I thought it was a silly feature--but I am finding that to be mighty handy--
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post #34 of 35 Old 07-31-2015, 09:21 PM
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Originally Posted by mikeswoods View Post
The last two years have been rough on my aging guns---
I've bought 5 Hitachi guns and so far I am pleased---two framing guns--a small crown stapler and two angled finish nailers--
The finish guns have a push button that lets you use the exhaust port as a blower---At first I thought it was a silly feature--but I am finding that to be mighty handy--
Hitachi earned my respect LONG ago as being 'tough' and dependable. Not just their nail guns either...

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post #35 of 35 Old 08-01-2015, 09:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OnealWoodworking View Post
Hitachi earned my respect LONG ago as being 'tough' and dependable. Not just their nail guns either...
Agreed. I have a cordless hammer drill driver that I bought in 2009 that's been dropped off camper roofs, left out in the rain, drilled thousands of holes through steel & concrete and 6" holesaw holes. Still the most powerful cordless I've ever used...
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