new drum sander question - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 16 Old 08-21-2015, 10:29 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 21
View indychips's Photo Album My Photos
new drum sander question

Finally! I pick up my new drum sander today. I make end grain cutting boards and I am really looking forward to my new toy. I do have a question for all you drum sander users. What sanding grit do you use on the drum to finish an end grain board? I have been told 150 grit but wanted other opinions. I am going today to buy a few rolls and wanted to get an idea on what everybody is using
indychips is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 16 Old 08-21-2015, 11:10 AM
Senior Member
 
hwebb99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,881
View hwebb99's Photo Album My Photos
That depends on how flat your boards are to start with. I'd start with 60 or 80 grit.
hwebb99 is offline  
post #3 of 16 Old 08-21-2015, 11:24 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 21
View indychips's Photo Album My Photos
I plan on starting off with 80 or 100 grit and moving up from there. I guess I will just have to see what works best for me as to the final grit before orbital sanding.
indychips is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 16 Old 08-21-2015, 01:56 PM
Senior Member
 
yank's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Prattville, Alabama, USA
Posts: 320
View yank's Photo Album My Photos
I make cutting boards also and start with 100grit on the drum sander, after that I go to the ROS 120, 150 to 180. Wet the board and let it dry, and use 220 on the ROS for finish it. Comes out nice and smooth.

My father was my inspiration for woodworking, wish he was still around for more advice. Luv ya Dad.
yank is offline  
post #5 of 16 Old 08-21-2015, 02:32 PM
Wood machinist
 
difalkner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: NW Louisiana
Posts: 3,233
View difalkner's Photo Album My Photos
We used 100 grit. 80 left scratches that I decided were too deep. Started to go to 120 but did like others and used ROS with 220 and then 320. Here's the thread for our build last Christmas - http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f13/b...-boards-66624/

David

Curly Wood Shop on Etsy
David Falkner - Woodworking YouTube channel
Our music at church - current videos Airline Baptist BC Facebook Live
Romans 3:23
difalkner is online now  
post #6 of 16 Old 08-21-2015, 04:37 PM
Village Idiot
 
epicfail48's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Springfield MO
Posts: 4,549
View epicfail48's Photo Album My Photos
I'll be honest, I've never used a drum sander, but 150 sounds too high if you're using it to level everything out. My intuition says that 100-120 would do a better job bringing everything into flat without leaving deep gouges that won't sand out easy

I need cheaper hobby
etsy.com/shop/projectepicfail
epicfail48 is offline  
post #7 of 16 Old 08-21-2015, 11:59 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Maine
Posts: 1,931
View Hammer1's Photo Album My Photos
You will find finer grits load up really fast and cause burns. You didn't say which sander. With a non oscillating drum, the straight circular motion will leave striations with any grit. You will have to finish sand after drum sanding no matter what. Striation marks are easier to remove than burns. You will discover the limitations of drum sanders if you are making more than two or three boards and doing any leveling beyond 1/16". Better just buy 80 grit to start.
Hammer1 is offline  
post #8 of 16 Old 08-22-2015, 12:12 AM
Senior Member
 
hwebb99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,881
View hwebb99's Photo Album My Photos
I start with a course grit, but stop with just before the board is flat. Then I change to a finer grit ( actually I have two drum sanders to avoid changing paper) and run it through until it is flat. Using this method I can remove most of the material with a course grit, and get the finish of a fine grit without loosing any extra thickness. Regardless of what grit you will still have to sand a fair bit with a ROS.
hwebb99 is offline  
post #9 of 16 Old 08-22-2015, 12:26 AM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,302
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
get some of these also

The sandpaper will gum up rapidly if it gets too hot. You then must clean it as best you can to avoid the striations Hammer1 talked about. Use these:
http://www.rockler.com/abrasive-cleaning-stick

It's a bit tricky to hold them in place while the drum is turning. It's like using a lathe, the stick must be supported against the rotation of the drum. Be very careful, but it will save your sandpaper 10 times over.

not quite the same machine:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TerX2U9JSig

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 08-22-2015 at 12:30 AM.
woodnthings is online now  
post #10 of 16 Old 08-22-2015, 10:37 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 340
View phoenixbound's Photo Album My Photos
Suggestion: get really good (ie, fast) at switching sanding rolls so that you aren't tempted to skip grits. skipping grits will result in too many scratch marks and will make you unhappy with your drum sander.

I use my finger to release the clips that hold the ends of the rolls, rather than using the tool that came with the Performax. YMMV
phoenixbound is offline  
post #11 of 16 Old 08-24-2015, 07:12 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: NW Pa
Posts: 2,815
View TimPa's Photo Album My Photos
glue is stronger than wood, and will cut your sandpaper which is one source of striation marks. lay the board at an angle, so that a glue line does not run straight pass the paper, giving it more chance to cut the paper.
TimPa is offline  
post #12 of 16 Old 08-27-2015, 05:55 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Panhandle of FL
Posts: 210
View davester84's Photo Album My Photos
I make a lot of cutting boards for craft fairs. I keep 80 grit on the drum sander and then use the ROS starting with 60grit (to help get rid of marks), then 120, then 220. I am happy with my results. But I may try some of the other suggestions Mentioned here to see if those work better.
davester84 is offline  
post #13 of 16 Old 08-28-2015, 10:04 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: WNC
Posts: 224
View UnisawGuy's Photo Album My Photos
I have a 25" dual drum sander. I run 80 grit on the first drum and 100 grit on the 2nd. For my cutting boards I sand at 80 grit, then finish with General Finishes salad Bowl finish.
A thickness sander burns the abrasive for only 2 reasons: 1. Taking off to much stock at a pass or 2. the most likely reason: inadequate dust collection.
UnisawGuy is offline  
post #14 of 16 Old 08-30-2015, 10:11 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 340
View phoenixbound's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnisawGuy View Post
I have a 25" dual drum sander. I run 80 grit on the first drum and 100 grit on the 2nd. For my cutting boards I sand at 80 grit, then finish with General Finishes salad Bowl finish.
A thickness sander burns the abrasive for only 2 reasons: 1. Taking off to much stock at a pass or 2. the most likely reason: inadequate dust collection.
And finer grits require less pressure to avoid burning, then thicker grits. Running 220 on a drum sander takes a delicate touch.
phoenixbound is offline  
post #15 of 16 Old 08-30-2015, 11:17 PM
Senior Member
 
hwebb99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,881
View hwebb99's Photo Album My Photos
I don't run anything finer than 120 on a drum sander. After that I can sand faster with a ROS and get a better finish.
hwebb99 is offline  
post #16 of 16 Old 08-31-2015, 06:25 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 340
View phoenixbound's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by hwebb99 View Post
I don't run anything finer than 120 on a drum sander. After that I can sand faster with a ROS and get a better finish.
I sometimes go to 180, taking multiple passes. I rarely use 220, but I was making a point about grits and pressure.
phoenixbound is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Can I pass the outer frame of a cabinet door through a planer? bauerbach General Woodworking Discussion 23 08-18-2015 11:18 AM
Table saw safety question voodoochile Power Tools & Machinery 10 08-10-2015 02:10 PM
drum sander- sand smart technology indychips General Woodworking Discussion 11 08-06-2015 09:14 PM
Finishing Raw Maple Drum Shells daman516 Wood Finishing 4 08-05-2015 03:21 PM
Orbital or Belt sander? powertoolgirl Hand Tools 6 08-02-2015 12:09 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome