My Countertop Near Range is Sticky - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 12 Old 11-09-2019, 09:49 AM Thread Starter
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Unhappy My Countertop Near Range is Sticky

Hi everyone, please help with this. We have had our countertops for a year now. The countertops near the electric range are becoming increasingly "sticky" and no matter how much you clean them, it is still sticky. We used a very expensive (I thought) $85/gallon - Modern Masters "MasterClear Supreme", (shown below) which was supposed to be a marine finish. The finish "looks" beautiful, and on the other side of the kitchen where there is no heat source, they are great, BUT, on the range side, about 2 feet out from the range, they are "sticky", but still beautiful to look at.

Can anyone give any advice?

Thank you VERY much in advance!
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post #2 of 12 Old 11-09-2019, 09:59 AM
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welcome to the forum.
can you post a photo of your stovetop and counter ?
what wood did you use for the countertop.
personally, I would use a laminate such as Wilsonart
that compliments the kitchen decor for around the cooktop.
airborne oils will always give you fits on a painted or varnished surface.
the sticky issue is not from heat - it is from airborne oils settling
on the surface.
this issue has plagued wooden boat owners since the beginning of time.
try to imagine a beautiful teak and mahogany galley on a boat.
the cooking area is always metal, tile or laminate because of this issue.
if you really want to use the wood around your cooktop, drop over to
www.woodenboat.com and search some of the threads dealing with
cooking areas.

.

.
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Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 11-09-2019 at 10:33 AM.
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post #3 of 12 Old 11-09-2019, 10:08 AM Thread Starter
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John Smith_inFL thank you very much! It's the expensive (don't know the name) 2 thicknesses of 3/4" plywood, then stained with a very light white, then finished with 2 or 3 coats of the finish. Was TOTALLY done the way the mfr said to do and was TOTALLY cured before use, we waited like 3 weeks between coats with no use whatsoever until cured. :(
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post #4 of 12 Old 11-09-2019, 10:15 AM
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Heat will soften the finish. What John Smith said- laminate, lasts forever and patterns to match even granite. Worked for a cabinet and lighting gallery- had Black Star (Wilson Art?) on the cabinet display just inside the entrance. People thought it was granite!

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
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post #5 of 12 Old 11-09-2019, 10:20 AM Thread Starter
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Hi John, since these are brand new counters, I do not want to change the surface, I understand I will need to resand down to the wood on the range side and refinish. Was just wondering what sealer/finish to use since that marine product didn't work with the normal heat next to the range. Thanks again! Anyone else?
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post #6 of 12 Old 11-09-2019, 10:39 AM
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Just my own two bits here:

I am a pure Southern Boy and I fry EVERYTHING in oil. my range hood
is mediocre at best and I still get airborne oil residue in the stovetop area.
sad to say, but, I am pretty sure the damage is already done to your surface.
if you really want to keep what you have, I think that the only recourse is to
remove the finish, and do it over.
and the preventative measure would be to clean IMMEDIATELY after cooking
anything - even pancakes. this will be an ongoing maintenance thing with no end.
people (including myself) have the same issue with cabinets over and near the
stovetop. so the "fix" solution would be the same for kitchen cabinets over and
near the cooking area.
(and as for the finish you used, I would call the 800# help line on the can and
ask them about using it around the stove area).
and again, your issue is not caused by stove heat.
heat rises - so you would see more damage to the cabinets than you would
to the countertops, if that were the issue. and you used the same finish on them.

.

.
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Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 11-09-2019 at 10:44 AM.
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post #7 of 12 Old 11-09-2019, 11:48 AM
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Modern Masters is owned by Rust-Oleum. Why not give them a call to ask about your issues? They make the product and should understand it the best.

https://www.modernmasters.com/pages/...ort/contact-us
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post #8 of 12 Old 11-10-2019, 08:27 AM
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No need to sand them ......

Quote:
Originally Posted by pastryguy View Post
Hi John, since these are brand new counters, I do not want to change the surface, I understand I will need to resand down to the wood on the range side and refinish. Was just wondering what sealer/finish to use since that marine product didn't work with the normal heat next to the range. Thanks again! Anyone else?

You just need to remove the grease that has settled on the top off the surface. I would use a card scraper, a thin, flexible steel plate sharpened to a burr edge. there's a trick to making the burr edge, but once you learn it, it's easy. this method will "cut" the old finish off but only minutely. Sanding will just spread any residue around and may imbed it into the wood. After the surface is free of residue, you may need to recoat it OR maybe not.......?



Watch a few of these:
https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...a+card+scraper

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #9 of 12 Old 11-10-2019, 03:01 PM
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pastryguy, I understand but airborne grease can travel distances. We have to clean a ceiling fan in the kitchen every so often to remove the grease. Distance is about 5-6 feet.

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
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post #10 of 12 Old 11-10-2019, 07:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Smith_inFL View Post
Just my own two bits here:

I am a pure Southern Boy and I fry EVERYTHING in oil. my range hood
is mediocre at best and I still get airborne oil residue in the stovetop area.
sad to say, but, I am pretty sure the damage is already done to your surface.
if you really want to keep what you have, I think that the only recourse is to
remove the finish, and do it over.
I just want to thank you for an informative post.

I have the same problem around our range...all the wood walls and cabinets are sticky. Now I know why. I always assumed heat. But now that I know the root cause...I'll put up some sort of backsplash (I think that's what it's called) and be more diligent about quick cleanups.

-Shimon
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post #11 of 12 Old 11-11-2019, 09:59 AM
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My wife needs to read this. We have an exhaust fan that exits to the roof of the house and I can't get her to use it.

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
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post #12 of 12 Old 11-16-2019, 02:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hawkeye10 View Post
My wife needs to read this. We have an exhaust fan that exits to the roof of the house and I can't get her to use it.
Wire the fan to the light.
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