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post #1 of 17 Old 10-10-2015, 12:31 PM Thread Starter
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Moulding

I dislike putting up crown moulding. Just saying.
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post #2 of 17 Old 10-10-2015, 03:27 PM
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Well, thanks for that.
What's the issue?
I like installing crown, but don't get the opportunity enough.

I also like coffee, and crisp fall days
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post #3 of 17 Old 10-10-2015, 05:28 PM
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Lol ^^^
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post #4 of 17 Old 10-10-2015, 08:34 PM
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I did crown molding in our dining room many years ago.

Visiting friend: "Looks good; how'd you get those joints so nice?"

Me: "Wood filler"
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post #5 of 17 Old 10-10-2015, 09:03 PM
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Speaking of work that's nearly built up with filler....
There's a fella on CT that does plaster restoration work... Lots of plaster crown and medallion details. His work is pretty damn amazing. I'm not sure of his company's name, but he goes by the username "Resta".
Anyone interested should check his stuff out... Cool chit.
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post #6 of 17 Old 10-11-2015, 02:08 AM
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This seems more like an off-topic section thread.
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post #7 of 17 Old 10-11-2015, 03:09 AM
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Could be... Didn't really start as anything more than an opinion on crown molding...
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post #8 of 17 Old 10-11-2015, 08:47 AM
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Crown molding looks good in the right setting. Like a Victorian home. Your average McMansion doesn't need crown molding. The reason crown molding exists, was to hide the poor wall to ceiling transition, like base board hides the poor floor to wall transition.

Tact is for people not witty enough to be sarcastic.
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post #9 of 17 Old 10-11-2015, 09:47 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quo Fan View Post
Crown molding looks good in the right setting. Like a Victorian home. Your average McMansion doesn't need crown molding. The reason crown molding exists, was to hide the poor wall to ceiling transition, like base board hides the poor floor to wall transition.
I agree, but it was installed and I had to remove a setion to do some work and neglected to put it back. So now I have to do it as I am selling the house. I have one more piece to install, and both are straight 90º cuts so that will be a snap..
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post #10 of 17 Old 10-11-2015, 10:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quo Fan View Post
Crown molding looks good in the right setting. Like a Victorian home. Your average McMansion doesn't need crown molding. The reason crown molding exists, was to hide the poor wall to ceiling transition, like base board hides the poor floor to wall transition.


You should educate yourself on the history of moulding in general. It was not at all originally intended to hide discrepancies.

CM is a classic look that is completely subjective and fits many different style homes.

After being in construction for many years I actually prefer it rather than the lack of it.
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post #11 of 17 Old 10-11-2015, 11:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quo Fan View Post
Crown molding looks good in the right setting. Like a Victorian home. Your average McMansion doesn't need crown molding. The reason crown molding exists, was to hide the poor wall to ceiling transition, like base board hides the poor floor to wall transition.

With all due respect you are wrong on all three statements. How did you come to believe this?

al


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post #12 of 17 Old 10-12-2015, 01:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BaldEagle2012 View Post
I dislike putting up crown moulding. Just saying.
As I get older, I dislike anything high overhead that I have to get on a ladder for. But sometimes you just can't avoid it.
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post #13 of 17 Old 10-12-2015, 07:02 PM
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Crown is all about practice and technique.

Cut in position and most of the math takes care of itself. Use a good angle finder to determine outside corner angles.

Cope inside corners to eliminate measuring their angles (a simple 45* cut and cope will hinge and stay tight on corners whose angles are off 90* by +/- 3*) and for extra forgiveness on the length of a piece (being a little long just makes the joint tighter). A cope can also be tapped up or down to both tighten the joint and make up for discrepancies in ceilings and walls.

Using a continuous stop to hold the crown in position eliminates guesswork and inconsistencies. Use a distance meter to measure.

Use a jig like the one in the picture to maintain the spring angle along a run. I use that jig and a scrap of crown to mark heights in the corners and save the time snapping lines.

Use a magnet to find the drywall screws in studs and joists vs a stud finder and find them as you install vs making an extra trip around the room marking them.

For ceilings under 10' I switched from a ladder to one of the Wallboard adjustable height drywall benches years ago. Easier to move around a room and requires fewer moves.
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post #14 of 17 Old 10-12-2015, 07:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Al B Thayer View Post
With all due respect you are wrong on all three statements. How did you come to believe this?

al
From here.
Function ~ At a basic level, mouldings conceal joints, or junctures, between two similar or dissimilar materials (this also keeps the bugs and roaches out!). For example, the area where a hardwood floor meets a sheetrock wall is covered by a baseboard, thus creating a transition between the two. Less obvious functions of mouldings include serving as a visual “foot” (baseboard) and “head” (crown), as well as creating eye-pleasing proportions within a room.

Tact is for people not witty enough to be sarcastic.
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post #15 of 17 Old 10-12-2015, 09:49 PM
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That is historically inaccurate. That is one modern persons view on moulding.

Ancient Greek designers used mouldings to divide surfaces into small parts, to create interest, and to produce highlights and shadows.Their vocabulary of mouldings consisted of the following shapes; fillet, astragal (bead), torus (rope), scotia, ovolo (quarter round), cavetto (cove), and cymanthium (crowning curve or ogee). These seven shapes used singularly or in combination form the basis for present day moulding profiles.

Today's mouldings still perform this decorative and aesthetic purpose. In ADDITION (not the primary reason for using), mouldings are used as a practical material for interior and exterior use to cover seems, cracks and uneven corners.


It has long been the notion of many in modern day that trim is an excuse for poor workmanship, this is not the case. It is generally a scapegoat used by those who perform work before trim is installed, and also the ignorant.

Last edited by Chamfer; 10-12-2015 at 11:08 PM.
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post #16 of 17 Old 10-12-2015, 10:30 PM
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Baseboard= mop board. :)

Al


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post #17 of 17 Old 10-12-2015, 11:18 PM
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