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post #1 of 7 Old 02-24-2013, 08:11 AM Thread Starter
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Most desirable NY woods

Anyone have a list of the most desirable wood types that grow in NY? I walk by ironwood, striped maple, crab apple and such. Is there any species that are more desirable but you just cant find at your average lumber mill? Thanx
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post #2 of 7 Old 02-24-2013, 10:22 AM
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Ironwood grows in NY? I was under the impression it came from South America.
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post #3 of 7 Old 02-24-2013, 10:58 AM
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Southwest NY has some of the nicest cherry in the world (along with northern Pennsylvania). Black walnut, ash, red and white oak, and all sorts of maple are plentiful. It's also not hard to come by butternut and cedar.
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post #4 of 7 Old 02-24-2013, 09:19 PM Thread Starter
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Steve the ironwood that grows around here may be a local name. Its in the tree book as ironwood or hornbeck I think? I'll have to look again. We do have a bit of striped maple around. Don't find to many bigger the 6"-8" round. I got two buck cherry in my yard. My gramps had a big old black birch that us kids always climbed on. Just wondering if there was any others. I live in upstate NY. We do have cedars a bit farther north, spruce, locust, I believe honey locust too. I believe the elm around here is one of our largest. Is any of that any good?
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post #5 of 7 Old 02-24-2013, 09:39 PM
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... I believe the elm around here is one of our largest. Is any of that any good?
Elm can be harder to work with due to movement, but if you let it acclimate, cut and plane it oversized, then let it reacclimate, it works pretty well. IMHO the grain is really beautiful, and well worth extra effort...it has a really interesting secondary grain that reminds me of bird feathers. It's also extremely strong.

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post #6 of 7 Old 02-24-2013, 10:34 PM
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Steve the ironwood that grows around here may be a local name. Its in the tree book as ironwood or hornbeck I think? I'll have to look again. We do have a bit of striped maple around. Don't find to many bigger the 6"-8" round. I got two buck cherry in my yard. My gramps had a big old black birch that us kids always climbed on. Just wondering if there was any others. I live in upstate NY. We do have cedars a bit farther north, spruce, locust, I believe honey locust too. I believe the elm around here is one of our largest. Is any of that any good?
Your right it's Carpinus Caroliniana (American Hornbeam) also known as blue-beech, ironwood or musclewood.
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post #7 of 7 Old 02-25-2013, 07:38 AM Thread Starter
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Elm can be harder to work with due to movement, but if you let it acclimate, cut and plane it oversized, then let it reacclimate, it works pretty well. IMHO the grain is really beautiful, and well worth extra effort...it has a really interesting secondary grain that reminds me of bird feathers. It's also extremely strong.

By movement I'm assuming you mean bowing and warping and shrinkage right? That sounds like wood that should be cut as 2"x12"s and dried, then screw them and glue them into 6"x12"s and then cut 'em down to 6"x10" beams for building leantos and small cabins. Sorry thinking out loud.
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