Mini wood lathe for my Son - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 10 Old 08-20-2019, 01:48 AM Thread Starter
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Mini wood lathe for my Son

It's a high time for my son to learn woodworking,so I am thinking to start guiding him by using a mini wood lathe,thinking to buy a used one as obvious it will be cheap than a new one but still will look for the suggestion on new one too.

And please also share your experiences on teaching your kids about this skill.It will help me out to get new ideas about the teaching method.

Every one of us is, even from his mother's womb, a master craftsman of idols.
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post #2 of 10 Old 08-20-2019, 01:55 AM
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I used an old JET mini lathe before, those are pretty nice. How old is your son? Have you much experience turning?


-T

"I see now that the circumstances of one's birth are irrelevant. It is what you do with the gift of life that determines who you are." -Mewtwo (Pokemon the Movie)
It's kind of strange that this line was delivered in that movie of all things. It's still a really good quote, and certainly a dang good thing to remember.
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post #3 of 10 Old 08-20-2019, 03:42 AM
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How old is your son? If he is very young, consider a scroll saw first, before a lathe.

One feature I would want on any lathe would be variable speed with an electronic speed adjustment knob. It is incredibly helpful to adjust or even tweak speed on the fly. The least expensive lathes I have seen are missing variable speed control. They are limited to a few speeds only (usually 5). Changing belts on them is inconvenient.

I have noticed that some lower end lathes look like they are made in the same factory. They all seem to have the same headstock shape and cheap looking, inconvenient flap/doors for changing the pulley belts. It is those inconvenient belt changes that I don't like. The lowest end lacks variable speed but has five pulley speeds only. The next models appear to be the same, except they include variable speed and an RPM readout. They have three pulley settings, but the variable speed is what matters. I have used several of those lathes, and they would be a fine choice for beginners, but I don't like the belt changing on them.

I bought a used Delta 46-460 midi lathe about a year ago for $350. The seller included the stand and an extension bed with its stand (not currently installed). It looks nearly identical to the current model Jet 1221vs lathe, down to the color of the paint. You can see that the unusual shape of the molded plastic pulley covers are identical, leading me to believe that they are essentially the same model made in the same factory. The newer Jet has several improvements over my older Delta. I like my Delta lathe - it works well for me and I think it would be a good lathe for a beginner. Belt changes are easy.

If I wanted a midi lathe that I could grow into for a long time, where price is no object, I would choose the new Laguna REVO 12|16. It is small, but mighty.

Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 08-20-2019 at 03:44 AM.
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post #4 of 10 Old 08-20-2019, 09:51 AM
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I am thoroughly amazed at the prices of used lathes on CL. Folks ask 300 to 500 dollars for old Monkey Wards 8 inch lathes on tubes and a friend recently purchased a Vega with outboard turning tool rest for $450. (stole it price) Two years ago, I purchased an old Delta Rockwell high school shop lathe for $400.00 It does more than I will ever need. Last spring I purchased a mid 19th century lathe for $10 I'll make a treadle and flywheel for demonstrations at a historical site., I have seen folks want $6,000 for a used powermatic and missed a powermatic 90 the guy advertised for $300. I did buy a little PSI turncrafter complete with two huge boxes of pen making supplies for $75.00 I keep it for little jobs when the larger lathes are set up for specific jobs. (I really hate changing tooling around)

the bells and whistles make things easier. However, there is nothing wrong with learning to do things old school. If a turner can do it on an old belt hopper, he can do it on anything. Not so much the other way round.
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post #5 of 10 Old 08-20-2019, 03:27 PM
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I suppose you would like it to be as "economical" as possible, I bought one of these to let the grand kids learn on, I have a 3 hp Grizzly 22x42 that was a little more then I was comfortable with them running


So I got this one they used it for about a month before deciding computer games were more fun, but I have turned hundreds of small things with it, for the price I have been very satisfied, it is pretty small, but works good


https://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/p...-VS-Mini-Lathe




As far as teaching them, turning pens and wine bottle plugs are pretty good small project to start on, I am hope you have better luck teaching then I did, but it is proof the apple doen't fall from the tree, their father, my step son is about the laziest person I have ever known, I was just hoping maybe I could get them interested in something beside computer games.


The Apprentice ( think those are the cheapest) pens this company sells are really very good pens, if you buy more than 50 of them they run $1.52. I have never sold any just gave them away to people who have gone above and beyond. It really makes the people happy when I give them one for no real reason

There is no app for experience

Last edited by Catpower; 08-20-2019 at 03:33 PM.
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post #6 of 10 Old 08-20-2019, 05:51 PM
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Also a good set of tools can cost more then a lot of machines, I got a set of these and they work very well, it will make learning easier, to start, but he won't be able to learn the art of sharping regular tools but that and shear action cutting are fairly easy to figure out. Scraping is the best way to get the feel of the machine when starting in my opinion


Can't beat the price of these, they are almost always on back order so they are selling them pretty fast, I really like the set I have, the only down side is you need to be careful not to drop them the inserts are a little fragile, might be a good idea to order a spare for the ones you use the most, for me it is the round nose and the 2" radius square




https://www.grizzly.com/products/Gri...sel-Set/T28505


There is no app for experience
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post #7 of 10 Old 08-20-2019, 09:50 PM
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Perhaps we should wait for the OP to chime back in before we flood him with out massive wealth of knowledge....???
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post #8 of 10 Old 08-21-2019, 12:30 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeebyWoodWorker View Post
I used an old JET mini lathe before, those are pretty nice. How old is your son? Have you much experience turning?


-T
My son is 14 years old I have 12-15 years of experience in wood turning

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post #9 of 10 Old 08-21-2019, 12:37 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by holtzdreher View Post
I am thoroughly amazed at the prices of used lathes on CL. Folks ask 300 to 500 dollars for old Monkey Wards 8 inch lathes on tubes and a friend recently purchased a Vega with outboard turning tool rest for $450. (stole it price) Two years ago, I purchased an old Delta Rockwell high school shop lathe for $400.00 It does more than I will ever need. Last spring I purchased a mid 19th century lathe for $10 I'll make a treadle and flywheel for demonstrations at a historical site., I have seen folks want $6,000 for a used powermatic and missed a powermatic 90 the guy advertised for $300. I did buy a little PSI turncrafter complete with two huge boxes of pen making supplies for $75.00 I keep it for little jobs when the larger lathes are set up for specific jobs. (I really hate changing tooling around)

the bells and whistles make things easier. However, there is nothing wrong with learning to do things old school. If a turner can do it on an old belt hopper, he can do it on anything. Not so much the other way round.
The mini wood lathe ranges in the price between 300- 500 dollars I have checked the price here https://topreviewedten.com/best-mini-wood-lathe/ I am hoping I can get a used mini wood lathe at under 200 dollar buying a big wood lathe doesn't seems to be a good investment let me know if you have any in your connection

Every one of us is, even from his mother's womb, a master craftsman of idols.
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post #10 of 10 Old 08-21-2019, 12:47 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Catpower View Post
Also a good set of tools can cost more then a lot of machines, I got a set of these and they work very well, it will make learning easier, to start, but he won't be able to learn the art of sharping regular tools but that and shear action cutting are fairly easy to figure out. Scraping is the best way to get the feel of the machine when starting in my opinion


Can't beat the price of these, they are almost always on back order so they are selling them pretty fast, I really like the set I have, the only down side is you need to be careful not to drop them the inserts are a little fragile, might be a good idea to order a spare for the ones you use the most, for me it is the round nose and the 2" radius square




https://www.grizzly.com/products/Gri...sel-Set/T28505

I will teach him with some basics for now giving these tool at his starting phase of learning won't be a good idea as there are chances my son will drop it and will break his tip or harm himself with these but thanks for the suggestion
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