A mini homemade table saw - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 18 Old 12-02-2017, 04:27 AM Thread Starter
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A mini homemade table saw

Hi all


these days I am traying to make some Homemade tools for my small projects, i builded this mini table saw ( I know safety should be taken with this kind of tools) as improvement i am thinking to add a bearing in the disc side to reduce constraintes on the drill, what do you think ?
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post #2 of 18 Old 12-02-2017, 07:36 AM
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If you look around you can find a jobsite tablesaw for less than the price of a cordless drill. It would function better and would be a lot less trouble than building a machine.
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post #3 of 18 Old 12-02-2017, 09:26 AM
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I think I paid $40 for my drill press. it is a Delta with a table and a 1/3 HP motor. I paid $85 for my first Craftsman contractor saw with a 1-1/2HP motor and a align-a-rip fence system. At the end of the day, if you like the whole process of building things like that then have at it. It isn't for me. For the most part you will have under powered tools that may or may not be suitable for the task.

I do like the idea of repurposing things. I don't know if everything is worth repurposing. I have seen variable speed treadmill motors used on lathes. I have seen windshield wiper motors used to drive lead screws on a lathe. Lots of good ideas out there.

Anyway, the best of luck to you with your creative tool effort.

Be safe.
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post #4 of 18 Old 12-02-2017, 09:44 AM
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Why?


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
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post #5 of 18 Old 12-02-2017, 10:27 AM
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Good grief, that made my hair stand up on my neck, just wait until he gets popped up side his head cutting on a table saw like that.

Years back, my dad made an old home made table saw like that, that is the only saw I ever got cut bad on. One trip to the er will more than pay for a safer saw, and for crying out loud, don't cut like that person in the video.

http://www.diychatroom.com/

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post #6 of 18 Old 12-02-2017, 10:59 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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Drills are made and designed to "drill" ....

It's one thing to be creative and "adapt" a tool for a specific need, BUT a whole 'nother thing to use it outside of it's original purpose.
Fist off the mount is not stable.
Second, the cut off piece should never be on the fence side of the blade when crosscutting and trapped within.
Finally, the drill does not spin fast enough to safely cut through wood when used in this manner.

If this is your invention, I would not use it in this manner. There are better ways to build a small table saw. My first table saw when I was 18 years old was an inverted Skil saw in a small stamped steel table. It had a crappy fence and was unsafe, but I had no idea really how bad it was. The table was actually an option from the factory, so I gave it no further though regarding safety. Now, I know better!

You Tube has many DIY table saw builds and some are reasonable, others are not. I understand being on a budget, and keeping costs to a minimum, BUT not at the expense of losing your fingers. :frown2:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #7 of 18 Old 12-02-2017, 11:57 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by subroc View Post

I do like the idea of repurposing things. I don't know if everything is worth repurposing. I have seen variable speed treadmill motors used on lathes. I have seen windshield wiper motors used to drive lead screws on a lathe. Lots of good ideas out there.

Anyway, the best of luck to you with your creative tool effort.

Be safe.
Thanks subroc
like you I prefer repurposing things and due to bdget and space I needed to make a mini table saw.
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post #8 of 18 Old 12-02-2017, 12:48 PM
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As for speed and power I'd forget the drill and at minimum use a handheld grinder. Heck, $20 from Horror Freight for cryin out loud.. If it's a matter of money you can nab plenty of good used table saws for next to nothing.
I can see doing it for just something to do to say you did it, fine, but to use the expense card doesn't really cut it when one tiny slipup can cost you a finger or more. And believe it or not they still make cheap handsaws that will cut through wood if you're desperate.. A for effort, but F for practicality..

I figured it's time to change my signature so hold your breath. This is it.
Impressive, huh?
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post #9 of 18 Old 12-02-2017, 12:58 PM
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I am willing to bet the OP does not live here in America, the land of plenty, where used and cheap imported tools are readily available.

That being said there is a still a need to consider one's safety above all else.

I went down that road many years ago so know where he is coming from, table saw was circular saw under a sheet of plywood, drill press was a hand drill in a stand, and router was a converted vacuum cleaner motor.
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post #10 of 18 Old 12-02-2017, 02:13 PM
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I have no issue with a guy building his own tools... look at Matthias Wandel...

A small tablesaw could come in handy in my shop especially.

However, the tool should be utilized correctly no matter the size. OP, add a miter slot or something to allow yourself to perform cross-cuts safely.
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post #11 of 18 Old 12-02-2017, 03:23 PM
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I've built a 2 axcis panel saw and a radial arm router, BUT

Quote:
Originally Posted by Masterofnone View Post
I have no issue with a guy building his own tools... look at Matthias Wandel...

A small tablesaw could come in handy in my shop especially.

However, the tool should be utilized correctly no matter the size. OP, add a miter slot or something to allow yourself to perform cross-cuts safely.

.....I know what I'm doing.

I'll wager the speed of the drill at maximum RPMs is 1200 or so. The diameter of the blade (X) the RPMs will determine that cutting rate of the teeth. A 10" diameter blade spinning at 4000 RPMs is II x D. or 3.14 X 10 = 31.4 " /12 = 2.61 ft. X 4000 rpm = 10,466 FPM. The drill will come no where near that speed with a 5" blade.

Now add to that issue if the mount can twist....at all ... and the blade is now fighting the kerf previously made and will stall the motor. How is the blade secured to the drill motor? in the chuck? on an arbor? Can it come loose? There are just too many issues which will make a for an unsafe setup. You Tube is known for it's videos that fall in the category ... "what could possibly go wrong?"

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 12-02-2017 at 04:41 PM.
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post #12 of 18 Old 12-02-2017, 10:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
I am willing to bet the OP does not live here in America, the land of plenty, where used and cheap imported tools are readily available.

That being said there is a still a need to consider one's safety above all else.

I went down that road many years ago so know where he is coming from, table saw was circular saw under a sheet of plywood, drill press was a hand drill in a stand, and router was a converted vacuum cleaner motor.
I think you are right, the IP address says Algeria
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post #13 of 18 Old 12-02-2017, 11:37 PM
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Building a table saw like this will almost definitely insure that you will be missing some digits in the near future.

There is a very fine line between a "hobby" and a "mental illness"
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post #14 of 18 Old 12-03-2017, 01:55 AM Thread Starter
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hi all
it seems that tool create a serious debate , and i like debates because sometimes they are construcvtive
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post #15 of 18 Old 12-03-2017, 02:59 AM
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I think were all just mainly worried that someone is going to lose a hand working with something like this... I've got nothing against homemade tools as long as they are made and used safely.

It's not bad to dream. But you also have to consider what's realistic. -All Might (Boku no Hero Academia)
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post #16 of 18 Old 12-03-2017, 07:51 AM
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there in lies the dilemma

Quote:
Originally Posted by WeebyWoodWorker View Post
I think were all just mainly worried that someone is going to lose a hand working with something like this... I've got nothing against homemade tools as long as they are made and used safely.
We agree. But "typically, usually, frequently ..." a homemade tool is made out of budget constraints by a beginner who doesn't have the experience to know what is safe or unsafe. They barely know the rules for safe operation of most tools. So we have a dilemma. All we can do is observe the operation which in this case is provided in the video and make recommendations, suggestions or improvements as we have done in this case.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #17 of 18 Old 12-03-2017, 09:11 AM
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A mini homemade table saw

A hand saw and wooden miter box would be safer and more effective. It could cut thicker material as well. Cost of a fine cutting pull saw, about $10; wooden miter box made out of scraps of wood. Less then the cost of any drill and blade, and you donít need to plug it in.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
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post #18 of 18 Old 12-03-2017, 11:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
We agree. But "typically, usually, frequently ..." a homemade tool is made out of budget constraints by a beginner who doesn't have the experience to know what is safe or unsafe. They barely know the rules for safe operation of most tools. So we have a dilemma. All we can do is observe the operation which in this case is provided in the video and make recommendations, suggestions or improvements as we have done in this case.

Well you've certainly got a point there mate...

It's not bad to dream. But you also have to consider what's realistic. -All Might (Boku no Hero Academia)
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