Maximum Stud Spacing - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 11 Old 09-14-2020, 11:20 PM Thread Starter
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Maximum Stud Spacing

I'm planning a garden shed that will be about 10' x 10' with a pyramidal roof. I'm thinking about framing it with 2 X 8's so I can build shelving into the stud bays by mounting horizontal 1x8's.

To maximize the shelf capacity, I'm wondering how far apart can I make the stud spacing and still maintain structural integrity of the walls. Sheathing will be OSB. I'm reasonably sure I can go 24" O.C. , but wondering if I can go wider than 24".

Thoughts?
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post #2 of 11 Old 09-15-2020, 12:23 AM
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I would go with 16 inch centers. The reason is that building inspectors tend to be anal retentive at times. As for the shelves, you can use pieces cut 14 inches wide from a sheet of Baltic Birch. Cut notches in using a saber saw (jig saw) to fit around the 2x8 studs. A sleeper or fat block between the studs can be used to support the shelf with screws through the BB and into the fat block.


These days the county assessors use Google aerial photos to "discover" new buildings. County Assessors also respond discretely to anonymous phone "tips" from irritated neighbors.

I had, what I believe was, a Contractors License Board enforcement officer show up asking me to build cabinets for him. He was too generically (Kaki and short sleeve dress shirt, no tie.) dressed to be a possible customer and was very irritated that I told him that I couldn't because I wasn't a licensed contractor. As he drove away I noticed that his license plates were "Exempt" meaning that he was from a government agency. Obviously a neighbor didn't think that I should be building cabinets for my garage.

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post #3 of 11 Old 09-15-2020, 07:45 AM
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What are you going to sheathe it with? That would have more to do with the stud placement than anything. It doesn't really need any vertical strength as it would framing a house. It's just the siding could bow between the studs and look bad. If you were to say use galvalume metal to sheathe the building you could put the studs 30" apart. 30" is about the maximum length I make shelves.

With the covid mess HD is charging 17 bucks for a 8' 2x8 right now. I don't see any reason you couldn't double 2x4's to do what you are doing.

Go to google and look at a satelite view of your property. See what colors are there in your yard and make the roof of the building as close to that color as possible. I added on to my house and because of the roof color you can't see it but an adjacent building I put a metal roof on it and they found it right quick.
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post #4 of 11 Old 09-15-2020, 08:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quickstep View Post
I'm planning a garden shed that will be about 10' x 10' with a pyramidal roof. I'm thinking about framing it with 2 X 8's so I can build shelving into the stud bays by mounting horizontal 1x8's.

To maximize the shelf capacity, I'm wondering how far apart can I make the stud spacing and still maintain structural integrity of the walls. Sheathing will be OSB. I'm reasonably sure I can go 24" O.C. , but wondering if I can go wider than 24".

Thoughts?
Without respect to any load bearing I think one issue is supporting the sheathing and siding adequately, and working within dimensions of the sheathing so you don't have to cut every sheet.

That puts you dealing with spacing that will align with 4x8, if you place the sheets horizontally that puts you at 24", 32", or 48". I'm not sure I could go to 48", but 32" might be doable, especially if you rely on your 1x8 shelves to keep the sheathing from buckling.
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post #5 of 11 Old 09-15-2020, 08:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
What are you going to sheathe it with? .
I believe he said OSB?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quickstep View Post
I'm planning a garden shed that will be about 10' x 10' with a pyramidal roof. I'm thinking about framing it with 2 X 8's so I can build shelving into the stud bays by mounting horizontal 1x8's.

To maximize the shelf capacity, I'm wondering how far apart can I make the stud spacing and still maintain structural integrity of the walls. Sheathing will be OSB. I'm reasonably sure I can go 24" O.C. , but wondering if I can go wider than 24".

Thoughts?

Take care,
Dave McCann
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post #6 of 11 Old 09-15-2020, 10:34 AM
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I believe he said OSB?
I just meant what siding he was going to put over the OSB would make a difference. You don't want to look down the side of a building and see waves between the studs.
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post #7 of 11 Old 09-15-2020, 04:08 PM Thread Starter
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I just meant what siding he was going to put over the OSB would make a difference. You don't want to look down the side of a building and see waves between the studs.
The siding will be cedar shingles.
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post #8 of 11 Old 09-15-2020, 05:29 PM
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The siding will be cedar shingles.
OK then the OSB would be an issue. You probably shouldn't space any more than 24" if you are going to put the shakes directly on the OSB. If you are going to put 1x2 or 1x4 furring strips over the OSB you could make almost any spacing you desire.
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post #9 of 11 Old 09-15-2020, 06:43 PM
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Shootsum gives good info. I have built a high tunnel ( green house without heat) with 32" spacing and 2x4 studs.
My building is different because I wanted as much sunlight as possible. I like your idea of 2x8 for studs. If you use 2x8's for the shelves then 32" spacing will hold a lot of weight. 1x8 at 32" is okay for most things that will go on the shelf.
You could make one or two rows 2x8's and the rest 1x8's if you want.
mike
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post #10 of 11 Old 09-15-2020, 07:47 PM
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There is another spacing that hasnt been mentioned... ifyou look at your tape measure, at roughly 19 3/16, there is a diamond... every 19 3/16 is another diamond... this is to have 5 cavities in an 8 span, versus, 6 cavities with 16 spacing, or 4 cavities with 24 spacing....alot of builders will use 2x6s on the exterior of homes to add thicker insulation, but them space the studs 19 3/16 apart.

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Fabian

I used to be fairly indecisive, but now....... I'm not so sure.
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post #11 of 11 Old 09-17-2020, 08:03 PM
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My take on this is it would depend on what the snow load is in your area. Here at my home/shop in the valley the building code is 24". Up at my vacation home at 6400'+ elevation it is 16". Check the spacing on your house. That should give you a clue, unless the code has changed since it was built.
...J.D.
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