Maple slab counter top - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 13 Old 04-12-2016, 09:55 PM Thread Starter
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Maple slab counter top

I have been hired to finish a Maple slab 7'by 3' at the widest point. They want a oil finish on it.Any one have a suggestion n what oil to use.
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post #2 of 13 Old 04-13-2016, 07:30 AM
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I think it's a bad idea to use a oil finish on a counter. An oil finish is not water resistant. Your best bet would be to use tung oil, not tung oil finish but 100% tung oil. Apply as many coats as you can stand. Tung oil can be used for the hull of a boat but for that application it's applied so thick it looks like varnish.
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post #3 of 13 Old 04-13-2016, 09:39 AM
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you might consider this product. I have been thinking of trying it. not sure about nut allergies???


that wide of a slab is going to be difficult to maintain. is it next to the sink?


http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/m...oilfinish.aspx
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post #4 of 13 Old 04-13-2016, 01:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
I think it's a bad idea to use a oil finish on a counter. An oil finish is not water resistant. ......
I agree 100%. I believe you should apply a hard finish such as lacquer or WB Poly. There will be water sitting on there at times in addition to god knows what else. Oil finishes are not resistant to any except of course trying to correct the problem with a hard finish later on.

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post #5 of 13 Old 04-13-2016, 10:01 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul
I think it's a bad idea to use a oil finish on a counter. An oil finish is not water resistant. Your best bet would be to use tung oil, not tung oil finish but 100% tung oil. Apply as many coats as you can stand. Tung oil can be used for the hull of a boat but for that application it's applied so thick it looks like varnish.
Thank you for your response. I left out a inportant fact 😐first off the slab is 7 foot long and at the widest point 3 foot. It will be coverd by a peace of glass raised of it by a few inches.As of right now they would like the wood as natural in color as they can keep it after iI Sand it t a high gloss .
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post #6 of 13 Old 04-13-2016, 10:09 PM
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Thank you for your response. I left out a inportant fact 😐first off the slab is 7 foot long and at the widest point 3 foot. It will be coverd by a peace of glass raised of it by a few inches.As of right now they would like the wood as natural in color as they can keep it after iI Sand it t a high gloss .
That would make a difference. Generally an oil finish is pretty dull and flat. Tung oil would produce a high gloss finish if enough were applied however has a yellow cast to it. You might try experimenting with different finishes to see what works best for you. To make the wood as unchanged in color as possible you might try a water based polyurethane. Another option might be a pre-catalyzed lacquer. It will darken the wood a little more than the water based poly but if you have the means of spraying would be the easiest method of achieving a thin high gloss finish.
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post #7 of 13 Old 04-14-2016, 07:03 AM
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Thank you for your response. I left out a inportant fact 😐first off the slab is 7 foot long and at the widest point 3 foot. It will be coverd by a peace of glass raised of it by a few inches.As of right now they would like the wood as natural in color as they can keep it after iI Sand it t a high gloss .
Is this counter top for display only or will it be used for something?

Sounds like a very bad to raise a sheet of glass by a few inches and then work on it, unless that is very heavy duty glass.

George
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post #8 of 13 Old 04-14-2016, 09:01 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you again for your response, talked to the client some more, the counter will be used to eat off of, and will be a extention off a existing counter.
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post #9 of 13 Old 04-14-2016, 10:28 AM
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are you sure the timber has dried sufficiently for use? that size of timber will require quite a bit of drying out! if it `caps` at all with the set up you describe, it will give the customer no end of headaches!
I once replaced a solid mahogany bar top that had capped so badly peoples drinks were slipping off the bar, human nature being as it is, (some) patrons were drinking most of their beers, allowing it to fall & demanding a fresh replacement!
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post #10 of 13 Old 04-14-2016, 11:42 AM
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are you sure the timber has dried sufficiently for use? that size of timber will require quite a bit of drying out! if it `caps` at all with the set up you describe, it will give the customer no end of headaches!.............
I totally agree
If $hit didnt happen, we would not have the expression "$hit happens".
I learned through experience to not trust any sawmill where you have no prior experience and dont know anyone that has had prior long term experience. I was fortunate with my first few slabs, in that nothing that had it's own wildlife and ecosystem had gone to a customer yet. I knew about kiln drying and was told that the slabs were kiln dried. The part I didnt know is that there is also another temperature/time relationship to kill critters. It took more than 8 months for the first sawdust to appear. Glad I hadn't sold those slabs. They were for me.
After that, whenever I bought slabs, they would sit in the office where it was heated and cooled for at least a year before I turned it into a furniture piece.
BTW, the OP never stated how thick the piece was or did I miss that part?
Also assume all is good, I would still go with a hard finish, most likely Conversion Varnish even though the piece is under glass. For several reasons, one would be to show off the grain pattern which oil finishes wont do and also for durability. When things spill on glass, somehow, the liquid manages to weep under the glass. Not always, not sometimes, but rarely. It's those rare occasions that will ruin your day if not properly protected.

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post #11 of 13 Old 04-15-2016, 08:50 AM Thread Starter
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We,the customer and I bought the slab from a reptable sawmill as far as I can tell. It was the first time i had ever been there. the slab was inside a trailer standing on end.I have no way of telling how dry it is. The slab will only be a show piece under a piece of tempered glass.The glass above it will be bigger than the slab itself.Its my job to put a finish on the slab , they donot want a high-gloss finish on it.
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post #12 of 13 Old 04-15-2016, 09:28 AM
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If you want to retain the looks of the grain pattern as much as possible, build all of your coats in high gloss. Put satin on the very last coat. The gloss is much clearer and will retain the figure of the wood and the last coat of satin will knock down the sheen.

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post #13 of 13 Old 04-16-2016, 10:42 AM
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Tim, I can`t help but think you may be setting yourself up for a fall here mate!
let me give one of a million scenarios, the slab moves putting stress on the glass but, no-one knows this, a guest puts a mug or plate or something down heavily, maybe seems too heavy handed to your customer & the sheet simply shatters, customer is not pleased (obviously) & the guest is baffled, sure the plate slipped at the last second but, not THAT badly?? bad feelings all round.
without being certain of the stability of the slab the best suggestion I can think of is, do not `attach` the glass to the slab, have it floating somehow, cos if that slab caps or twists, man, lets not go there,
keep them separate for now my friend & tell them you`ll affix it properly at a later date. Tony above suggests a year, & I think we`d all like to know how thick it is?

Last edited by wastrel; 04-16-2016 at 10:44 AM.
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