Maple multiply - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 7 Old 03-07-2018, 09:51 AM Thread Starter
Vbryanv
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 90
View Vbryanv's Photo Album My Photos
Maple multiply

I was looking online at Baltic birch plywood and I ran across Maple multiply. Question is is there a reason why I would use maple multiply over Baltic Birch. From what I was reading the maple is heavier and is more resistant to scratching. It also looks like a maple has more Plys and cost more.

I was also reading an article that said using a veneer core plywood may give you some issues that won't show up till after finishing because it may transfer any variations to the top. They said for cabinets you should use mdf core plywood.. Does that make sense

https://www.popularwoodworking.com/t..._right_plywood

Check out this other link. They list a bunch of different plywoods and also go into a little about how it's constructed and history

https://www.andersonplywood.com/278/hardwood-plywood/

Maple on the left.
Baltic on the right.

It seems like there is so much to learn about plywood.. Even so much to say that manufactures will change the name of their plywood once it gets a bad rap to the name of a good selling plywood.
"The species used in imported plywood can also be a mystery. The names the material is sold under are not the names of specific species. From Luan to Chen-Chen, the names given are trade names for groups of species, which may or may not have similar properties. These names may also change from time to time. If one imported name gets a bad reputation, the same product may be sold under a new name, and people will try it, hoping that it will be better. Sometimes material from one continent will be sold using the name of a successful product from another. On the world market, there are between 50 and 100 trade names in use, and little or no regulation or standards" ( popular woodworking.com)
The choices are crazy first the letter system. Them the core. Then where its made. I mean china, domestic, import.. Really what's the difference between china and import?Wouldn't China plywood be an import?

Sorry this just turned into a rant.. Back to the real question uses for maple multiply.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Screenshot_20180307-075909_1520430648479.png
Views:	256
Size:	1.11 MB
ID:	347137  

Click image for larger version

Name:	Screenshot_20180307-075924_1520430655319.jpg
Views:	43
Size:	81.8 KB
ID:	347145  


Being happy is doing the things you love to do with the people you love to do them with.. Even if that someone is just you and a power tool.
Vbryanv is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 7 Old 03-07-2018, 10:15 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 11,856
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
If I was choosing between different products it would depend upon for what I was using them. There is no one answer that fits all situations.

George
GeorgeC is offline  
post #3 of 7 Old 03-07-2018, 11:00 AM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 25,951
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
weight and country of origin

You said Maple weighs more. Do they give a square foot weight on each product? It look like there is considerably more glue line showing on the Maple, and maybe that's the reason for increased weight since Maple and Birch weigh about the same.

Also depending on the glue, one may have better moisture resistance than the other? What are those specs? Finally, the country of origin could be important since the names have been "duplicated" by various countries. I would trust the Europeans more than the Asians.
Who knows?

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 7 Old 03-07-2018, 11:10 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Garland, TX
Posts: 4,232
View Toolman50's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vbryanv View Post
I was looking online at Baltic birch plywood and I ran across Maple multiply. Question is is there a reason why I would use maple multiply over Baltic Birch. From what I was reading the maple is heavier and is more resistant to scratching. It also looks like a maple has more Plys and cost more.

SOUNDS LIKE YOUVE ALREADY GOT YOUR ANSWER ON THIS ONE.

I was also reading an article that said using a veneer core plywood may give you some issues that won't show up till after finishing because it may transfer any variations to the top. They said for cabinets you should use mdf core plywood.. Does that make sense

THIS SOUNDS LIKE AN AD FOR MDF TO ME.
I PERSONALLY PREFER PLYWOOD OVER MDF FOR MOST PROJECTS.

https://www.popularwoodworking.com/t..._right_plywood

Check out this other link. They list a bunch of different plywoods and also go into a little about how it's constructed and history

https://www.andersonplywood.com/278/hardwood-plywood/

Maple on the left.
Baltic on the right.

It seems like there is so much to learn about plywood.. Even so much to say that manufactures will change the name of their plywood once it gets a bad rap to the name of a good selling plywood.
"The species used in imported plywood can also be a mystery. The names the material is sold under are not the names of specific species. From Luan to Chen-Chen, the names given are trade names for groups of species, which may or may not have similar properties. These names may also change from time to time. If one imported name gets a bad reputation, the same product may be sold under a new name, and people will try it, hoping that it will be better. Sometimes material from one continent will be sold using the name of a successful product from another. On the world market, there are between 50 and 100 trade names in use, and little or no regulation or standards" ( popular woodworking.com)
The choices are crazy first the letter system. Them the core. Then where its made. I mean china, domestic, import.. Really what's the difference between china and import?Wouldn't China plywood be an import?

Sorry this just turned into a rant.. Back to the real question uses for maple multiply.
MUCH OF TODAYS BETTER PLYWOOD IS ACTUALLY MADE ON A SHIP IN INTERNATIONAL WATERS. The best thing we can do is rely on a good supplier for our materials. The Big Box stores do not always carry the best choices. More plys has always translated into higher quality, more strength and usually a little more expense.
Plywood can be purchased with almost any hardwood veneer on it’s face. You can buy Walnut, Mahogany, etc. Birch is a very common “builders grade” plywood. It is preferred by most over Fir or Pine because it is smoother and can be stained or painted more easily.
Plywood can be a more practical than hardwood for some choices. And believe it or not, a good grade of plywood is usually stronger than a solid wood. Plywood doesn’t move (expand and contract) as much as a solid wood.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
Toolman50 is offline  
post #5 of 7 Old 03-07-2018, 11:24 AM Thread Starter
Vbryanv
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 90
View Vbryanv's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolman50 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vbryanv View Post
I was looking online at Baltic birch plywood and I ran across Maple multiply. Question is is there a reason why I would use maple multiply over Baltic Birch. From what I was reading the maple is heavier and is more resistant to scratching. It also looks like a maple has more Plys and cost more.

SOUNDS LIKE YOUVE ALREADY GOT YOUR

ANSWER ON THIS ONE.

I was also reading an article that said using a veneer core plywood may give you some issues that won't show up till after finishing because it may transfer any variations to the top. They said for cabinets you should use mdf core plywood.. Does that make sense

THIS SOUNDS LIKE AN AD FOR MDF TO ME.
I PERSONALLY PREFER PLYWOOD OVER MDF FOR MOST PROJECTS.

https://www.popularwoodworking.com/t..._right_plywood

Check out this other link. They list a bunch of different plywoods and also go into a little about how it's constructed and history

https://www.andersonplywood.com/278/hardwood-plywood/

Maple on the left.
Baltic on the right.

It seems like there is so much to learn about plywood.. Even so much to say that manufactures will change the name of their plywood once it gets a bad rap to the name of a good selling plywood.
"The species used in imported plywood can also be a mystery. The names the material is sold under are not the names of specific species. From Luan to Chen-Chen, the names given are trade names for groups of species, which may or may not have similar properties. These names may also change from time to time. If one imported name gets a bad reputation, the same product may be sold under a new name, and people will try it, hoping that it will be better. Sometimes material from one continent will be sold using the name of a successful product from another. On the world market, there are between 50 and 100 trade names in use, and little or no regulation or standards" ( popular woodworking.com)
The choices are crazy first the letter system. Them the core. Then where its made. I mean china, domestic, import.. Really what's the difference between china and import?Wouldn't China plywood be an import?

Sorry this just turned into a rant.. Back to the real question uses for maple multiply.
MUCH OF TODAYS BETTER PLYWOOD IS ACTUALLY MADE ON A SHIP IN INTERNATIONAL WATERS. The best thing we can do is rely on a good supplier for our materials. The Big Box stores do not always carry the best choices. More plys has always translated into higher quality, more strength and usually a little more expense.
Plywood can be purchased with almost any hardwood veneer on it’s face. You can buy Walnut, Mahogany, etc. Birch is a very common “builders grade” plywood. It is preferred by most over Fir or Pine because it is smoother and can be stained or painted more easily.
Plywood can be a more practical than hardwood for some choices. And believe it or not, a good grade of plywood is usually stronger than a solid wood. Plywood doesn’t move (expand and contract) as much as a solid wood.
But then where does Baltic birch fall into this equation

Being happy is doing the things you love to do with the people you love to do them with.. Even if that someone is just you and a power tool.
Vbryanv is offline  
post #6 of 7 Old 03-07-2018, 01:03 PM
Senior Member
 
TomCT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Central PA
Posts: 1,246
View TomCT2's Photo Album My Photos
the big box stores carry the cheapest stuff -
five ply is the usual and common construction. more plies are used for better stability, less void issues, better strength, etc.

in the printing / converting industry 'old school' cutting dies were blocks of plywood individually cut and pieced together, held in compression by a frame. the newfangled laser die cutters use a single solid sheet and the die rules/knives are slotted into the cuts. that plywood is typically 7 ply, no voids, extremely stable. basically plywood is used for more than covering windows during a hurricane and there's more than one 'quality' level.

no big secrets.

if you're using plywood and you want a quality piece, look for more than 5 ply - it's the cheapest, some of it not even decent quality and frankly I would not recommend using it for anything other than next-to-throw-away shop type projects.

some places stock / order "furniture grade"
TomCT2 is offline  
post #7 of 7 Old 03-07-2018, 01:52 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Garland, TX
Posts: 4,232
View Toolman50's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vbryanv View Post
But then where does Baltic birch fall into this equation
Baltic Birch was first introduced as a very high grade Birch Plywood. It was solid with no voids and it was normal to see 7 plys on 1/2”. A sheet of this plywood can be sized differently from the old standard 4 X 8’ sheet. There are now different grades of Baltic Birch and we need to look it over carefully when selecting for quality.
This is why a good plywood supplier can be beneficial. They may stock more than one grade of Baltic Birch.
Your Birch Plywood does not have to be Baltic.
And there is also lumber core plywood. Lumber core as the name implies does not have your typical plys but has outer veneers with solid lumber in the center. This is beneficial if you were making shelving and did not want the plys.
Again, a good supplier can carry high quality but the last lumber core I purchased was absolute crap at $38 per sheet and I couldn’t use it because of all the voids hidden between the outer plys.
In large metro area we have lumber yards, hardwood lumber suppliers and plywood specialty suppliers. A plywood specialty will have more selection and many times better pricing on plywood of all types.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?

Last edited by Toolman50; 03-07-2018 at 01:55 PM.
Toolman50 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Staining Maple Veneer & Matching Lori123 Wood Finishing 12 09-07-2017 08:44 PM
Newbie finishing maple butcher block bench top sierra1911 Wood Finishing 3 07-30-2017 10:14 PM
Curly Maple and Walnut cross - build thread difalkner Project Showcase 26 04-23-2017 05:25 PM
Lyptus and hard maple Noumenon Joinery 5 03-10-2017 12:43 PM
laminating maple onto SY pine for workbench top cschoenberg1 General Woodworking Discussion 13 01-24-2017 09:59 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome