Make boards parallel without tablesaw - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 18 Old 05-15-2020, 05:12 AM Thread Starter
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Make boards parallel without tablesaw

Hi there,

Ik want to edge joint boards. Ik can joint one side of a board with my router, but I don't have a tablesaw to rip the other side parallel to the jointed edge. Is there a way to do this without a expensive table saw?

Thanks in advance
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post #2 of 18 Old 05-15-2020, 05:32 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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You will need a long straight edge .....

If you use a router against a straight edge that's fine. You can also use a circular saw, much cheaper than a table saw. If you don't have a circ saw, then you will need a hand saw with large set teeth and cut just outside your line. Then you can go back with your router and straighten out the edge.

The factory cut edge of plywood, hardboard or MDF is typically pretty straight. You'll need a piece at least 6" wide, and 2 clamps to secure it.

The base of the router or circular saw needs to stay flat on the board to be straightened and tight against the factory edge of your straight edge guide. A router can only remove 1/16" or so at one time, so a circ saw is much better. Your work support can be another sheet of plywood resting on sawhorses which have 3 or more 2 X 4's on top. A good support is as important as the straight edge.

A simple support torsion box can be made from a sheet of 1/2" plywood which you get cut in half down the length at the home store. Then pick out 3 Poplar 1 X 3's that are straight and flat and 8 ft long. When you get them all home, glue and clamp one of the Poplar boards to the factory edge making certain it's nice and flush. Then glue and clamp another to the opposite edge. Then place one down the middle and glue and clamp it using weights in the center.

You can add small blocks joining the center board to the outer boards if you want, but drill some 1" holes in them all in the same place to allow 3/4" pipes to fit all the way down inside the box. These pipes can later be used as clamps for 'end vises'. Now place the other 2 ft X 8 ft X 1/2" plywood sheet on top and glue and clamp and weight it down making certain the factory edges are on both the same side.
This will make a strong, stiff, light weight torsion box you can use for lots of projects. You can add legs or use sawhorses:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 05-15-2020 at 06:28 AM.
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post #3 of 18 Old 05-15-2020, 06:06 AM
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I have used a circular saw after making a strait edge guide that I found on the forum.
Actually used some alloy L moulding. Worked so well, able to make cabinets with it.
johnep
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post #4 of 18 Old 05-15-2020, 07:01 AM
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You can also get a mirror fit by clamping them down to a work surface with a a tiny space between the two boards, a 1/16 or so and then run a circular saw down the middle while using a straight edge. That cut should with perhaps some fine sanding should yield a tight fit.
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post #5 of 18 Old 05-15-2020, 09:52 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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That may work ...or not?

Quote:
Originally Posted by SWrick View Post
You can also get a mirror fit by clamping them down to a work surface with a a tiny space between the two boards, a 1/16 or so and then run a circular saw down the middle while using a straight edge. That cut should with perhaps some fine sanding should yield a tight fit.



If the boards are curved more than a "total" of 1/16", it won't work.

The next choice is to set the boards so the edges are as close to straight across as possible then clamp them tightly together. Next, use your hand plane to level them end to end and butt the edges together for trial fits, with no gaps. When you've got no gaps they are ready for gluing, but do the same for adjoining boards on the opposite edges because after gluing, you won't be able to.


Like this:
https://youtu.be/JZAaCaOJhkg?t=339


https://www.woodworkersjournal.com/h...t-joint-edges/

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #6 of 18 Old 05-15-2020, 11:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
If the boards are curved more than a "total" of 1/16", it won't work.

snip
Nothing says you can't make a second or third cut.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #7 of 18 Old 05-15-2020, 12:52 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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Obviously !

Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
Nothing says you can't make a second or third cut.

You can make 10 passes if that's what it takes. A board with a 3/8" deep curve would be better approached with a bandsaw, a hand plane or a power plane to get rid of most of the curve rather than repeated passes with the typical "thin kerf' blade that comes with and is most often sold for most circular saws. Now, that's just my opinion, but you can choose your own approach. Actually, my method is to use a straight line jig on the table saw, which is faster but just as accurate as my jointer. The big stack of boards on the left were straight lined in just a few minutes. Notice the off cut on the left of the blade, it's about 1 1/2" at it's widest point:


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Last edited by woodnthings; 05-15-2020 at 12:57 PM.
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post #8 of 18 Old 05-15-2020, 02:13 PM
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I would like to know which tools are available for @nielswitlox227 to use for this job? At the moment, all we have is one post telling us that Niel has a router and does not have a table saw.
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post #9 of 18 Old 05-16-2020, 01:44 AM Thread Starter
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@Tool Agnostics, sorry for the pack of information. Ingave a hand router and a circulair saw. And then I have a little mitter saw, a drillpress and the standaard handtool, but no handplaner. But I don't think these last tools will do the trick.
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post #10 of 18 Old 05-16-2020, 04:35 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnedp34 View Post
I have used a circular saw after making a strait edge guide that I found on the forum.
Actually used some alloy L moulding. Worked so well, able to make cabinets with it.
johnep
Ik have the small guide that comes with the circular saw. Ik do not trust that thing tot cut completely parallel to the other end of te board. I could attach a longer strait edge to it, but I'm scared that the one pin that goes into my circular saw wil bend a bit.
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post #11 of 18 Old 05-16-2020, 04:43 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
If you use a router against a straight edge that's fine. You can also use a circular saw, much cheaper than a table saw. If you don't have a circ saw, then you will need a hand saw with large set teeth and cut just outside your line. Then you can go back with your router and straighten out the edge.

The factory cut edge of plywood, hardboard or MDF is typically pretty straight. You'll need a piece at least 6" wide, and 2 clamps to secure it.

The base of the router or circular saw needs to stay flat on the board to be straightened and tight against the factory edge of your straight edge guide. A router can only remove 1/16" or so at one time, so a circ saw is much better. Your work support can be another sheet of plywood resting on sawhorses which have 3 or more 2 X 4's on top. A good support is as important as the straight edge.

A simple support torsion box can be made from a sheet of 1/2" plywood which you get cut in half down the length at the home store. Then pick out 3 Poplar 1 X 3's that are straight and flat and 8 ft long. When you get them all home, glue and clamp one of the Poplar boards to the factory edge making certain it's nice and flush. Then glue and clamp another to the opposite edge. Then place one down the middle and glue and clamp it using weights in the center.

You can add small blocks joining the center board to the outer boards if you want, but drill some 1" holes in them all in the same place to allow 3/4" pipes to fit all the way down inside the box. These pipes can later be used as clamps for 'end vises'. Now place the other 2 ft X 8 ft X 1/2" plywood sheet on top and glue and clamp and weight it down making certain the factory edges are on both the same side.
This will make a strong, stiff, light weight torsion box you can use for lots of projects. You can add legs or use sawhorses:
Thank you for the many informatiom youve given me. English is not my firt language and I am used tot the metric system (I'm Dutch). So I Will take the time to study your information when I have got the time for it.
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post #12 of 18 Old 05-16-2020, 05:32 AM Thread Starter
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Ik ment lack, Dutch automatic correction is not helping me today.
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post #13 of 18 Old 05-16-2020, 05:35 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SWrick View Post
You can also get a mirror fit by clamping them down to a work surface with a a tiny space between the two boards, a 1/16 or so and then run a circular saw down the middle while using a straight edge. That cut should with perhaps some fine sanding should yield a tight fit.
This is not the solution to my problem. I want to make one side of the board parallel to the other side tot get a true straight board. But I love the Idea, I might use it someday. Thank you.
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post #14 of 18 Old 05-16-2020, 08:05 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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You need a "track" saw OR .....

Quote:
Originally Posted by nielswitlox227 View Post
Thank you for the many informatiom youve given me. English is not my firt language and I am used tot the metric system (I'm Dutch). So I Will take the time to study your information when I have got the time for it.

I'm sorry I forgot to explain how to get two edges parallel.


You will need to straight one edge first. Either use your router or a circular saw.

You then place your straight edge guide on the work for the circ saw to rise against.

Then you will measure over to the desired width and make a mark at either end the same amount. You must subtract the distance from the blade to the saw's base, usually about 1.5 "

Next you align the straight edge guide to both marks, exactly!


Make your final cut and check the width for parallel.




The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 05-16-2020 at 08:18 AM.
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post #15 of 18 Old 05-16-2020, 09:51 AM
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I get "reasonable" results by clamping a long board with a known straight edge to whatever I want to cut, then using the straight board as a simple guide for my circular saw. I don't have a special "jig" or "track." I simply hold the edge of the circular saw against the edge of the board and make the cut. It works reasonably well.

In your case, you will have to do what @woodnthings suggests: Get a clean straight edge on one side with your "router/jointer", then find a long enough guide board with a perfectly straight edge. Measure very carefully to clamp the straight side of a guide board parallel to the first straight edge. You will need two clamps, one at each end of the guide board. You will also need to use patience and care when measuring and clamping the guide board.

Remember to leave the correct offset for the blade, depending on which direction you will be cutting. Also remember which side of the blade will make the cut edge that you want. The blade has its own thickness (kerf). A fresh, sharp, new blade in the circular saw will make a better, smoother cut, too.

If your circular saw does not leave a smooth enough edge, then use it to cut one or two mm wide. After that, measure and adjust the guide board (still parallel to the first straight edge) to guide the router/jointer to get a cleaner edge.

Practice on scrapwood first.
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post #16 of 18 Old 05-16-2020, 10:15 AM
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A circular saw will work just fine ....

Quote:
Originally Posted by nielswitlox227 View Post
@Tool Agnostics, sorry for the pack of information. Ingave a hand router and a circulair saw. And then I have a little mitter saw, a drillpress and the standaard handtool, but no handplaner. But I don't think these last tools will do the trick.

Just follow the advice I gave you above. @Tool Agnostic gave you the same advice so it must be good?



Straighten one edge, measure and mark, saw with the guide, check for parallel, done.



The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #17 of 18 Old 05-16-2020, 01:58 PM
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I prefer to follow a guide fastened to the material rather than one attached to the saw.

Whatever type of guide you use will come down to how experienced you are with a circular saw.

A good quality blade is essential, usually not the one that came with the saw.

The cut must be continuous, do not stop to reposition yourself, your initial setup is very important.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #18 of 18 Old 05-16-2020, 02:51 PM
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Unless it's just a rough cut .....

I will use the supplied factory rip guide that is attached to the saw for rips for framing and rough cuts. Otherwise, I use a straight edge of various sorts clamped to the work.



Just this past week I needed to rip some Maple veneer plywood into 17" wide pieces off the 4 X 8 sheet to get them upstairs easier than a carrying the full 4 X 8 sheet. I remembered I had a section of barn door track that would make a good straight edge guide IF it was "straight enough" .... well, good enough for these eyes. These tracks have a "U" shaped section with a channel for the wheels and brackets to fit in. They will also allow a squeeze clamp to slide in and be clamped at any distance from the end! Perfect!

These are the tracks for about $32.00 per:

https://www.lowes.com/pd/National-Ha...B&gclsrc=aw.ds
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