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post #1 of 15 Old 01-30-2016, 02:12 AM Thread Starter
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looking for a theaded insert -

Im making a wood shift gear knob and trying to find matching for a rod. this is the dimensions ( the 20g is the threads parameter ...) where can I find what im looking for ?( ebay )
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post #2 of 15 Old 01-30-2016, 02:42 AM
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I usually use a coupling nut for projects like that but I searched for 9M inserts and could not find any and I have no idea what a 20g thread is.
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post #3 of 15 Old 01-30-2016, 03:20 AM
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If you drill an 8.5mm hole and countersink a little, would probably find the metal thread on the rod will simply cut its own thread into the knob. Try with a piece of scrap.
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post #4 of 15 Old 01-30-2016, 04:51 AM
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So the circumference of the bolt is 20 grams, or the thread length is 20 grams? Either way, that makes no sense because grams are a measure for weight, not distance. May want to double check your units, unless you found a way to measure distance with a scale.

Now that thats out of the way, weve got another problem. Assuming the diameter you have listed for the shank is correct, you need an M9 threaded insert. The problem is, M9 isnt a thing. It goes from M8 to M10. An 3/8 imperial thread would have a diameter off close to 9mm, but really without knowing the thread size i dont believe anybody will be able to help you.

Hardware stores usually have a thread gauge hanging in their fastener section. Take your bolt there, find out which hole it screws into, and thatll be your thread size. Without that, the only thing that can really be said is to google threaded inset and order one of everything that comes up

I need cheaper hobby
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post #5 of 15 Old 01-30-2016, 06:41 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by epicfail48 View Post
So the circumference of the bolt is 20 grams, or the thread length is 20 grams? Either way, that makes no sense because grams are a measure for weight, not distance. May want to double check your units, unless you found a way to measure distance with a scale.

Now that thats out of the way, weve got another problem. Assuming the diameter you have listed for the shank is correct, you need an M9 threaded insert. The problem is, M9 isnt a thing. It goes from M8 to M10. An 3/8 imperial thread would have a diameter off close to 9mm, but really without knowing the thread size i dont believe anybody will be able to help you.

Hardware stores usually have a thread gauge hanging in their fastener section. Take your bolt there, find out which hole it screws into, and thatll be your thread size. Without that, the only thing that can really be said is to google threaded inset and order one of everything that comes up
I bought this and measure and that was the parameter...as you can see there is a20G parameter and its not weight. http://www.ebay.com/itm/52-Blades-St...item280c185b6d

Last edited by soundmun; 01-30-2016 at 06:45 AM.
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post #6 of 15 Old 01-30-2016, 10:40 AM
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The G denotes British Standard Parallel Pipe threads, your gauge measures Metric and Whitworth, use the Metric end so you come up with just a number, possibly 1.0 or 1.25 which should get you headed toward a standard metric product.

Also check if it is a SAE thread such as 3/8" - 16 TPI or 24 TPI.

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Last edited by FrankC; 01-30-2016 at 12:47 PM.
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post #7 of 15 Old 01-30-2016, 11:12 AM
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I don't know if I exactly know what you are talking about,,,,but I have made threaded inserts to go in wood using a anchor that was taped at 3/8th ,,,the kind like you use in concrete, ,,,cut it off and used the threaded part,,,and used a 3/8 bolt to drive it into the wood,,,don't know if this will help,,lol,,just my 2 cents worth,,lol
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post #8 of 15 Old 01-30-2016, 12:02 PM
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Drill a hole so that a regular nut fits snug. Use super glue in the hole and put the nut it. I used that several times, and it is a good alternative to getting a threaded nut to fit the bolt that I am going to use.
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post #9 of 15 Old 01-30-2016, 12:55 PM
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The measurement indicated is Whitworth threads(55 degrees). Are you certain they are Whitworth? Metrics are 60 degrees, and much more common. Although 9mm is also not a common size, most US metric fasteners are even numbered so that would likely be an 8x1.25.
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post #10 of 15 Old 01-30-2016, 02:53 PM
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I wonder if it's for an old British car ...I built a British steam engine kit back in the mid 70's that used whitworth
and haven't seen any since ..they were pretty much petered out by then.
You need to measure the diameter of the threads accurately ..with a caliper or mic.
There's nothing close to 9mm in the witworth chart I looked at .


Your socket head cap screw (bolt) is expressed as Diameter of the thread x pitch ( distance between each thread) x length( measured as distance from end of fastener to below the head).
1/2-13x3 ....M10-1.25x30

I've ran into a few custom sizes in machine repair and in making custom fasteners over the years but 9mm is about as queer a size as I ever heard of.

If you can't work around this fastener maybe you could retap the part this goes to , to a more standard size.

Knot Stumped ...just confused once in a while.

Last edited by Tree Hugger; 01-30-2016 at 02:56 PM.
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post #11 of 15 Old 01-30-2016, 11:27 PM Thread Starter
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OK my BAD sorry ( scale was offset...)
- The exact diameter of the thread is 10mm and threads indicats 1.25 Metric .
I saw there are right hand and left hand- whats the meaning of that?

Last edited by soundmun; 01-30-2016 at 11:39 PM.
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post #12 of 15 Old 01-31-2016, 12:31 AM
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Ok , a 10-1.25 is a pretty common metric thread . Most all fasteners tighten by turning right....right hand (or clockwise).
On rare occasion you may encounter a left hand thread ( tightens by turning counterclockwise).
Try zoro or amazon or maybe ebay for metric threaded rod in the 10x1.25 size ( Google metric threaded rod).
Lots of hardware stores and box stores carry inch threaded rod but I've yet to see any metric.
Nuts on the other hand shouldn't be hard to find locally.

Knot Stumped ...just confused once in a while.
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post #13 of 15 Old 01-31-2016, 02:47 AM
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Since we were kidnapped by Europe, we have been metricated. 10 mm is a standard size thread on cars. US often confuses the two systems. You may remember the plane which had to make an emergency landing in the Atlantic and the Mars space craft which crashed. Cut wood sizes all in mm
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post #14 of 15 Old 01-31-2016, 04:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soundmun View Post
OK my BAD sorry ( scale was offset...)
- The exact diameter of the thread is 10mm and threads indicats 1.25 Metric .
I saw there are right hand and left hand- whats the meaning of that?
Most bolts and screws are right hand thread, you turn them clockwise to tighten.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #15 of 15 Old 01-31-2016, 04:22 PM
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Originally Posted by soundmun View Post
The exact diameter of the thread is 10mm and threads indicats 1.25 Metric
That I can understand and I like to use coupling nuts because they provide more threads than just using a nut.

http://www.clipsandfasteners.com/1_M..._p/pm34294.htm
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