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post #1 of 39 Old 04-30-2019, 01:47 PM Thread Starter
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Looking for some info

Hey guys. I am still in the planning stages for my new (sideline) business. Since my Dad recently passed away I now have all his woodworking tools. Dad was a master carpenter and woodworker. Thanks to him, I learned a great deal over the years about woodworking. I am planning to "primarily" build caskets and fill the gaps with unusual birdhouses and roadside crosses. This is not my sole source of income at this point. My full time job is a AutoCAD draftsman/designer but hopefully at some point I can move into this full time.

On to my request/question:

1. I have a Craftsman 10" table-saw. I need to Dado blade set but paying $200+ dollars right now is not in my budget. Can anyone tell me where to find a 10" Dado set that is reasonably priced OR can I make a 8" set work on my 10" saw?

2. What is a good and inexpensive wood engraver? I would like to have the ability to engrave my products per the customers request as needed. Is this one decent or are they cheap junk?

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...B&gclsrc=aw.ds

Thanks for your help.
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post #2 of 39 Old 04-30-2019, 03:20 PM
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You can use a six inch dado on a 10 inch table saw. I donít remember for sure but you can cut around a one inch deep dado or groove which is plenty deep enough for any application Iíve ever used a dado stack for.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
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post #3 of 39 Old 04-30-2019, 03:25 PM Thread Starter
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You can use a six inch dado on a 10 inch table saw. I don’t remember for sure but you can cut around a one inch deep dado or groove which is plenty deep enough for any application I’ve ever used a dado stack for.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
A 6"? Wow, I will definitely look into that for sure. Can you offer a good brand to go with with?

Can you or anyone also give me a info / link to where I can buy good lumber for reasonable prices? That stuff at HD & Lowe's is mostly junk from my experience and seems way overpriced.
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post #4 of 39 Old 04-30-2019, 04:18 PM
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A 6" dado may not cut deep enough for you. I bought one and within a few months I was buying an 8". Have been using the 8" for decades now. I've never needed one bigger.

What ever dado set you get buy a carbide tipped set. The 6" set I bought was just high speed steel and it dulled pretty quickly but the carbide set hasn't ever been to the saw sharpen shop.
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post #5 of 39 Old 04-30-2019, 04:21 PM
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I hate making recommendations because there are always cheaper alternatives that someone will point out, but I stick with premium brands, supporting North American workers first, European workers second. For dado blades that means Forrest or Freud.

Actually the wood that comes from the big box stores and shrink wrapped in plastic is usually decent quality boards of consistent length and width which makes planning you project easier, they are just pricy. To save money on lumber that usually means buying local and buying rough cut. Check local listings for lumber suppliers or lumber mills. Local Craigslist lists individuals selling lumber as well. Downside is youíll need to invest in jointer and planer, but if you go through enough lumber they will pay for themselves in no time.

There are also mail order sources of lumber such as woodworkers source https://www.woodworkerssource.com/ and bell Forrest products https://www.bellforestproducts.com/ just to list a couple Iím familiar with. The lumber from these sources are high quality, but assorted lengths, widths and are planed to 25/32 thickness, which means you still need a planer.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
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post #6 of 39 Old 04-30-2019, 04:22 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
A 6" dado may not cut deep enough for you. I bought one and within a few months I was buying an 8". Have been using the 8" for decades now. I've never needed one bigger.

What ever dado set you get buy a carbide tipped set. The 6" set I bought was just high speed steel and it dulled pretty quickly but the carbide set hasn't ever been to the saw sharpen shop.
Great Info. Thank you very much. I will price out the 6" and 8" carbide tipped set. Right now, I cannot forsee a time when I would need a Dado to go deeper than 1" but you never know, LOL.
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post #7 of 39 Old 04-30-2019, 04:30 PM Thread Starter
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I hate making recommendations because there are always cheaper alternatives that someone will point out, but I stick with premium brands, supporting North American workers first, European workers second. For dado blades that means Forrest or Freud.

Actually the wood that comes from the big box stores and shrink wrapped in plastic is usually decent quality boards of consistent length and width which makes planning you project easier, they are just pricy. To save money on lumber that usually means buying local and buying rough cut. Check local listings for lumber suppliers or lumber mills. Local Craigslist lists individuals selling lumber as well. Downside is youíll need to invest in jointer and planer, but if you go through enough lumber they will pay for themselves in no time.

There are also mail order sources of lumber such as woodworkers source https://www.woodworkerssource.com/ and bell Forrest products https://www.bellforestproducts.com/ just to list a couple Iím familiar with. The lumber from these sources are high quality, but assorted lengths, widths and are planed to 25/32 thickness, which means you still need a planer.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
Thanks Terry. Your info is much appreciated sir. I too prefer to keep money here is the USA so I will check on the Forrest and Freud brands. I am on a very limited budget starting out but a Dado set is one investment I rather not skimp on. I want straight, clean and crisp edges on all my cuts.

I may just post up a wanted add on C/L for old lumber. Might stumble across something decent at some point. I am planning to use Cedar, Red Oak, Pine, Poplar, and if someone wants it bad enough; Mahogany.

I don't currently have a planer but it is in my cross-hairs for a hopefully near future purchase as well.
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post #8 of 39 Old 04-30-2019, 04:58 PM
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I have a dado set I never use since I've moved onto using a router. A 3/8 bit is 3/8 and a 3/4 bit is 3/4 etc. Routers cut straight, crisp and as deep as anyone will ever need. I consider routers to be the best tool for dados - but I'll be the 1st to admit there are always more then 1 way to accomplish a particular woodworking task.
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post #9 of 39 Old 04-30-2019, 05:03 PM Thread Starter
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I have a dado set I never use since I've moved onto using a router. A 3/8 bit is 3/8 and a 3/4 bit is 3/4 etc. Routers cut straight, crisp and as deep as anyone will ever need. I consider routers to be the best tool for dados - but I'll be the 1st to admit there are always more then 1 way to accomplish a particular woodworking task.
Hi Bernie. Thank you for sharing your method. I have a real nice router/table setup with some real nice bits that Dad bought before he passed. I have considered your method and will probably do that on the shorter length boards. However cutting a groove in an 84"+ long board the table saw would make it a bit I feel like. Building caskets there will be a lot of long 84"+ dado cuts. I am pretty sure at some point long the way I will find a good combination of using the saw vs. router.
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post #10 of 39 Old 04-30-2019, 05:08 PM
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That reads like a strange wood assortment for caskets. Are you planning on human caskets or some other variety.


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post #11 of 39 Old 04-30-2019, 05:14 PM Thread Starter
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That reads like a strange wood assortment for caskets. Are you planning on human caskets or some other variety.


George
Yes, I will be building caskets for human use. Typical human caskets are 84" long x 28" wide x 23" tall. Some of my designs will require cutting dado slots in the long runs of the bottom, top and intermediate vertical pieces. Some of mine will have side panels similar to that of a traditional door. The types of wood will mostly up to the buyer. I will offer some as basic pine versions and some with a little nicer wood but ultimately it will come down to me keeping the cost down to a minimum.

Here are a couple examples of what I will be offering is various types of wood:
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Last edited by LRM; 04-30-2019 at 05:19 PM.
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post #12 of 39 Old 04-30-2019, 05:19 PM
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Forrest video on their various Woodworking blades is informative if youíve never seen it, especially when talking about blade heights for ripping, crosscutting and plywood; previously I was taught that they all required the same blade height in relation to the tooth gullet.

The discussion of 6 inch and 8 inch dados starts at the nineteen minute mark. 6 inch dodo set cuts just over one inch deep dados, 8 inch set cut two inch deep dados.



After getting a dado set for my table saw I rarely use a router table for dados. The dado set can be dialed in to an exact fit of the material you are going to be using, a 3/4 inch router bit is worthless on plywood or melamine because they arenít 3/4 inch thick. Even plywood router bits donít guarantee a perfect fit. In addition, making a 3/8 or 1/2 inch deep dado on a table saw can easily be done in one pass, not so for a router table unless you want to burn up your router bits.




In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
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post #13 of 39 Old 04-30-2019, 05:23 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Terry Q View Post
Forrest video on their various Woodworking blades is informative if youíve never seen it, especially when talking about blade heights for ripping, crosscutting and plywood; previously I was taught that they all required the same blade height in relation to the tooth gullet.

The discussion of 6 inch and 8 inch dados starts at the nineteen minute mark. 6 inch dodo set cuts just over one inch deep dados, 8 inch set cut two inch deep dados.

https://youtu.be/-SgdTXphEJ4


After getting a dado set for my table saw I rarely use a router table for dados. The dado set can be dialed in to an exact fit of the material you are going to be using, a 3/4 inch router bit is worthless on plywood or melamine because they arenít 3/4 inch thick. Even plywood router bits donít guarantee a perfect fit. In addition, making a 3/8 or 1/2 inch deep dado on a table saw can easily be done in one pass, not so for a router table unless you want to burn up your router bits.




In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
No, I have not seen this video but I will watch it this evening. I really appreciate everyone's varying opinions and experiences. That is exactly what I am hoping to get from this forum. I am making mental notes for each of your experiences and I will use that when setting up and trying out what methods work best for me. GREAT INFO guys!
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post #14 of 39 Old 04-30-2019, 08:59 PM
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The diameter of your dado set will also depend on the HP of your saw, the larger it is the more power it takes to cut a dado, so if your saw is a lower HP you may be happier with a 6" that will make the dado in one pass rather than an 8" that you have to make two passes with.
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post #15 of 39 Old 04-30-2019, 09:41 PM
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You were asking about the CNC Router. I have one just like that one. They will work on very small projects. If you were thinking about engraving on the casket you would be much better off with the X-Carve CNC Router. Reasons; Size, Speed, Versatility. The bed on the X-Carve does not move which enables you to carve on a really long board. The small one you were looking at could take upwards of 28 hours to do a detailed carving or even longer.

You can find out about the X-Carve here https://www.inventables.com/technologies/x-carve/choose
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post #16 of 39 Old 05-01-2019, 09:42 AM Thread Starter
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The diameter of your dado set will also depend on the HP of your saw, the larger it is the more power it takes to cut a dado, so if your saw is a lower HP you may be happier with a 6" that will make the dado in one pass rather than an 8" that you have to make two passes with.
Mine has a 1.5 HP Sears Craftsman motor, RPM 3450. Is seems to rip most any piece of lumber with ease. Of course I always keep a very new/sharp blade on it so that helps too.

How do do you think this size motor will work with a 6 or 8?

Zack M.
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post #17 of 39 Old 05-01-2019, 09:44 AM Thread Starter
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You were asking about the CNC Router. I have one just like that one. They will work on very small projects. If you were thinking about engraving on the casket you would be much better off with the X-Carve CNC Router. Reasons; Size, Speed, Versatility. The bed on the X-Carve does not move which enables you to carve on a really long board. The small one you were looking at could take upwards of 28 hours to do a detailed carving or even longer.

You can find out about the X-Carve here https://www.inventables.com/technologies/x-carve/choose
Great info Paul! The price of that other one had me a bit skeptical. I will check into this one you provided the link for. I may have to wait a while to build up some funds but at some point I really want to get one of these. Thanks again.

Zack M.
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post #18 of 39 Old 05-01-2019, 10:08 AM
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Zack, I have used 8" dados (up to 3/4" wide) for years with no problems using a 1-1/2 hp table saw.

Gary
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post #19 of 39 Old 05-01-2019, 10:12 AM Thread Starter
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Zack, I have used 8" dados (up to 3/4" wide) for years with no problems using a 1-1/2 hp table saw.
Thank you Gary. 8" sounds like it might be my best choice. I'm thinking 1/2" to 3/4" deep is about all I will ever need to go for building panels. It really surprises me how much these Dado sets cost, LOL.

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post #20 of 39 Old 05-01-2019, 10:44 AM
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6" VS 8" dado VS router bits ....

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Hi Bernie. Thank you for sharing your method. I have a real nice router/table setup with some real nice bits that Dad bought before he passed. I have considered your method and will probably do that on the shorter length boards. However cutting a groove in an 84"+ long board the table saw would make it a bit I feel like. Building caskets there will be a lot of long 84"+ dado cuts. I am pretty sure at some point long the way I will find a good combination of using the saw vs. router.



I have used all of them at various times. I have the "luxury" of a table saw permanently setup with an 8" dado set. I never needed the full depth of the 8" set, mostly only 1/2" to 3/8" deep, so a 6" set would do almost everything I ever need. I use the Oshlun brand in both 6" and 8" sizes with nice results. I also have a Freud set that I have yet to use. I can see in the casket making "business" you will be making a zillion dados unlike me, so if it's at all possible give yourself a break a get a 2nd table saw for dados! Many woodworkers find a used Craftsman 10" saw and dedicate it to making rabbetts and dados! Rabbets are another great woodworking joint and should not be overlooked.



Running 84" dados or rabbetts with a router would NOT be my choice. I have made 16" long dados across shelving using my router because running a long shelf board across the table saw is unweildy and leads to inaccurate dados. I have also used a RAS a great deal for 16" long dados and is my preferred method for those! I have the "luxury" of having a 2nd RAS setup for shorter dados as well!



A router table, lift and 3 HP router will cost you around $1000 and is a wonderful addition to any shop. I have 2 of those, but unless I'm doing a lot of "edge profiling".... the router tables don't get used much ...... and I don't. Not a waste of money, just a bit of overkill., a tool "addict's" downfall.


You can get the Oshlun 6" or 8" sets on Amazon. The 6" is under $70.00, and the 8" is about $92.00. Other brands vary in price to up over $200.00. One advantage of the 6" set is the "run down time" until the blades stop spinning and it is safe to work around them, another mostly overlooked aspect of the smaller size. I'd get the 6" and move up if it becomes necessary. In running a business keep all your receipts and get a tax number with will give you access to some wholesale pricing. The receipts will be used a tax time to amortize your equipment costs over 5 or 10 years. Also keep all your yearly utility bills ..... heating, cooling and lighting doesn't grow on trees! A good income tax person would be my recommendation!

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by Steve Neul; 05-02-2019 at 08:32 AM. Reason: remove last line
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