Looking to get into woodworking. Questions of tools and lumber. - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 10 Old 04-18-2016, 02:25 AM Thread Starter
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Looking to get into woodworking. Questions of tools and lumber.

I'm looking to get into some woodworking, but have some questions about tools and lumber.

The only real tools I have access too are my scroll saw, which can take up to 2" thickness. My dads Miter saw and hand saw, then some other little tools, files, sandpaper, and drill. Nothing else really for woodworking.

Some of the projects that have come up to mind are:
rc boat, deep V. fast-ish 48". (high on my list)
Recycle bin for inside the house
Some benches and shelves for the garage.
A smoke stack was a idea, assuming I can get safe wood for it.
Cutting board.

Anyone here hear of harbor freight? I plan to buy "some" tools from there, that have good reviews. one of them are the cast iron pipe clamps.

Lowes has cedar board wood that is "kiln-dried" Is this wood safe to burn or eat on?

Alright, this getting to one of my main questions. I possibly plan to use 2x4 and cut it several times long wise, to get a bunch of 2" wide, 8ft long, 1/4"~ thin strips, to make the hull of the boat. I could do it with 4" wide strips, but I don't think I have anything that can cut that. But my problem will be with how true the wood is.
(I'm also considering plywood, but not sure at this point)

How can I make the wood square with the tools I have or what can I get to do so? (I though about a hand plane but they seem to have bad reviews and I guess I need a long/jointer one? Not looking for anything real expensive tho) I'm guessing the wood will be warped a bit, then however I cut it into the long strips will make it worse.
So yeah... How could I effectively make the wood strips are square? (I don't remember being good with my scroll saw, and the throat isn't 48" like I need)

I'm still working on plans for my boat, and plan to make a thread for it when the time comes.

Thanks,
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post #2 of 10 Old 04-18-2016, 03:23 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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short of writing a book on the subject ....

Your questions have more questions within them, and to do justice would require very detailed explanations, in other woods, too much for simple answers here.

Your scroll saw is less of a "woodworking tool" and more of a craft tool. You can do some woodworking tasks with it, but it's very limited.

Harbor Freight clamps are OK, I have some of their squeeze types, but they run out of "grip" sooner than later. Their other hand tools are OK. I've had great luck with their angle grinders, but I don't use their stationary power tools. Used cast iron Craftsman is a better source for power tools.


You will not have any luck sawing 2 X 4"s into narrow strips, no matter what tool you use. You are better off to purchase those narrow strip pre-cut that way they are already dry and will warp much less.


You will need to understand how wood behaves, moves, and cuts and that's a whole "book" in itself. The different species have different properties ... Oak is different than Pine etc.

Hand tools vs powertools?
My shop has a both, and I find that for preparing large wood planks form rough sawn lumber I use the power tools almost exclusively. Hand saws and hand planes are used for touch up and trimming, not ripping, jointing, crosscutting and thicknessing or planing.
This video will get you started with the basic handtools:



As far as basic power tools, that's a whole 'nother book, too much to cover here in a paragraph. Again check out You Tube to get started. The Wood Whisperer" has some good videos and gives clear explanations. You will find that a table saw is the heart of a woodworking shop and you will need to get one eventually. Table saw safety is a whole 'nother very long topic. There are threads on that here, check them out.

https://www.youtube.com/user/TheWoodWhisperer

:smile3:
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #3 of 10 Old 04-18-2016, 07:09 AM
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I think you asked too many questions at once to get good answers. The lumber from the lumber companies are only good to do crude work. To do real woodworking you need more tools. I would start with a jointer and a table saw. The jointer you would use to square and straighten the lumber as well as dress the edges if you needed to glue them together. Then use the table saw to cut the lumber to the dimensions you need. You don't have to buy brand new machinery, you could watch craigslist and buy used. Woodworking machinery most of the time will last a person a lifetime if taken care of so unless the machine looks abused you are probably good.

All of us know Harbor Freight and don't be surprised if the topic turns into an argument. Some people will say everything HF sells is junk. It's true some items are junk but then some items most every company makes are junk. All of them are competing with each other and making their tools cheaper and cheaper and selected items from each company they went too far. Myself personally I use a lot of HF tools and I've only had to return a few. Harbor Freight will take tools back without any red tape or argument.

What do you mean you want to make a smoke stack? Wood is flammable so you will have to be very careful there.
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post #4 of 10 Old 04-18-2016, 01:23 PM
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Look at one today's other post above to see what tools our forum suggest for a beginning woodworker. You will see different choices, but all are coming from experienced guys.
Good luck to you.

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #5 of 10 Old 04-18-2016, 10:00 PM Thread Starter
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Smile

Sorry about so many questions. I was even losing myself in typing all of them.
About the wood stack. When I moved to my new house, there were a bunch of bricks in my garage. I though I could possibly use them for a tall base of a smoke stack, strictly for low temperature smoking of jerky. Is a new jointer supposed to be in $250 low end range?
I can find some table saws for $130+ from Ryobi which I think is a good brand.
(Their $130 model will probably suit me well. There is even a used one on craigslist, but not sure if I like the used price)

Lows have a all purpose respirator for $40, would this be overkill for a beginner? Kiln-dried wood is safe to burn and eat on right?
I don't want to end up with something bad or dead.

I will check out the video and Learning Woodworking's other videos, and TheWoodWhisperer. Will also read more threads in "Todays's Posts" Assuming that is what Toolman50 is talking about.

Thanks guys.
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Last edited by Higgins909; 04-18-2016 at 10:03 PM. Reason: Went to preview and it wanted me to sign in or something so I did and it posted it instead.
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post #6 of 10 Old 04-18-2016, 11:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Higgins909 View Post
Sorry about so many questions. I was even losing myself in typing all of them.
About the wood stack. When I moved to my new house, there were a bunch of bricks in my garage. I though I could possibly use them for a tall base of a smoke stack, strictly for low temperature smoking of jerky. Is a new jointer supposed to be in $250 low end range?
I can find some table saws for $130+ from Ryobi which I think is a good brand.
(Their $130 model will probably suit me well. There is even a used one on craigslist, but not sure if I like the used price)

Lows have a all purpose respirator for $40, would this be overkill for a beginner? Kiln-dried wood is safe to burn and eat on right?
I don't want to end up with something bad or dead.

I will check out the video and Learning Woodworking's other videos, and TheWoodWhisperer. Will also read more threads in "Todays's Posts" Assuming that is what Toolman50 is talking about.

Thanks guys.
Jointers vary a great deal in price but $250.00 would be very low on the price list. Try to find one that has a rear table that is adjustable and try to get one with as long a table as you can. It's pretty hard to straighten 8' long lumber on a little table top jointer.

I have a Ryobi table saw that is small enough I use on a jobsite. It's a pretty cheesy piece of equipment which I would never recommend for someone's shop.

Harbor Freight makes a pretty good respirator much cheaper than 40 bucks. Also a 3M Disposable would be a good one on the cheap. It doesn't have replaceable cartilages but if you are not spraying paint all day every day that isn't necessary.

There is no chemicals added to kiln dried lumber. The lumber is just heated to remove the water from the wood. I don't know if you would want to cook with pine though. You really need a wood like pecan, hickory or mesquite for that.
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post #7 of 10 Old 04-19-2016, 12:30 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
Jointers vary a great deal in price but $250.00 would be very low on the price list. Try to find one that has a rear table that is adjustable and try to get one with as long a table as you can. It's pretty hard to straighten 8' long lumber on a little table top jointer.

I have a Ryobi table saw that is small enough I use on a jobsite. It's a pretty cheesy piece of equipment which I would never recommend for someone's shop.

Harbor Freight makes a pretty good respirator much cheaper than 40 bucks. Also a 3M Disposable would be a good one on the cheap. It doesn't have replaceable cartilages but if you are not spraying paint all day every day that isn't necessary.

There is no chemicals added to kiln dried lumber. The lumber is just heated to remove the water from the wood. I don't know if you would want to cook with pine though. You really need a wood like pecan, hickory or mesquite for that.
Is this the table saw you're talking about, or the model above? http://www.homedepot.com/p/Ryobi-15-...A&gclsrc=aw.ds
Good for the lumber. I want to make a larger cutting board and well I assume treated lumber isn't safe for chopping food on.
Then if I ever make the smoke stack, it would be bad if it caught fire and was treated lumber. I don't plan on burning kiln dried lumber.

Back to the table saw tho. I don't have too much room in the garage. I also thought that this would be good enough for me.
I don't think I will be cutting any lumber wider then 6" which I think this can handle about 13"? I'm also not looking to spend too much money.
(If I gotta buy the jointer at a minimum of $250, then a table saw like this for $130... well it adds up and there was some other stuff I possibly need for the project, without spending alot)
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post #8 of 10 Old 04-19-2016, 07:06 AM
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The saw looks like a newer version of the one. I really don't think you will like it. Even cutting small parts it cuts pretty crude. I don't think I've ever cut any hardwood with my saw. I think it would lack the power to do it. I would recommend getting at least a contractor size saw. It wouldn't take up much more space and would work a lot better for you.
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post #9 of 10 Old 04-19-2016, 09:20 AM
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Doubt you will find a "good" table saw under $300 new. I bought this one years ago and it's held up well:

http://www.lowes.com/pd_510902-46069...=50146380&pl=1

Best bet is good used equipment. A good 6" jointer should turn up in the $150 - 200 range.

Alexis de Tocqueville was a very smart man.
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post #10 of 10 Old 04-19-2016, 09:21 AM
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IMO Higgins, you seem to be wandering a bit rather than concentrating on one or two projects. Try focusing on the tools you will need to build an item safely and simply. Also consider getting a book about beginning woodworking to give you ideas as to tools required and building plans and procedures. Be safe..
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