Keeping glue in the refrigerator - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 13 Old 06-26-2018, 04:50 AM Thread Starter
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Keeping glue in the refrigerator

I would have never thought of doing it, but the company that makes titebond actually suggests storing it in the fridge if possible..
http://www.titebond.com/news_article...nger_Life.aspx

I have seen it separate in cold weather..It doesn't take much to shake it back to normal though..
Anyone else store their wood glue in the fridge? I'm pretty sure the old woman would think I lost it if I started storing glue in the fridge..

I figured it's time to change my signature so hold your breath. This is it.
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post #2 of 13 Old 06-26-2018, 07:19 AM
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I keep my CA in the fridge. Wood glue, not.
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post #3 of 13 Old 06-26-2018, 07:52 AM
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As long as the fridge didn't get down below freezing it would be good for it as well as any chemical products you use. I had a job in 2005 I bought too much oil based paint for and I keep it in the fridge to keep it from going bad. Another note, Titebond is more sensitive to cold than most brands. I think when the time came to use it I would get the glue out of the fridge a couple days before using it and perhaps shake it good.
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post #4 of 13 Old 06-26-2018, 07:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maylar View Post
I keep my CA in the fridge. Wood glue, not.

I have not heard that about CA glue. I have some CA glue I am going to throw away pretty soon. Next time I will put it in the frig.

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
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post #5 of 13 Old 06-26-2018, 12:09 PM
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I have been keeping CA glues and toluene based glues in the fridge for years.

Another tip is to use a bit of vaseline or similar product on the cap when replacing. Helps the seal and prevents the cap from bonding to the container.
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post #6 of 13 Old 06-26-2018, 03:03 PM
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Titebond has been recommending that for as long as I can recall. As far back as the nineties. I always keep the CA glues in the fridge as that was advice from model railroaders back then also. I don't buy large quantities of Titebond, so it doesn't set around very long to get old and stringy. I once bought a gallon of it because it was on sale, but it may have been old when I bought it and it went bad before I could use it up.

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post #7 of 13 Old 06-26-2018, 09:05 PM
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Just don't get it mixed up with the salad dressing. That would be a new meaning to- stick to your ribs.
FWIW, my late mother-in-law fixed her breakfast and didn't have her glasses on. She had cat food for breakfast. The good news is we never had any mice after that.

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post #8 of 13 Old 06-26-2018, 10:58 PM
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That is very funny.

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
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post #9 of 13 Old 06-27-2018, 09:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
As long as the fridge didn't get down below freezing it would be good for it as well as any chemical products you use. I had a job in 2005 I bought too much oil based paint for and I keep it in the fridge to keep it from going bad. Another note, Titebond is more sensitive to cold than most brands. I think when the time came to use it I would get the glue out of the fridge a couple days before using it and perhaps shake it good.
Okay folks. I respect Steve a lot, but:

-> It is a bad idea to store chemicals in the refrigerator with food.

Even with the best sealed containers, don't take the risk. Cross-contamination from chemicals and solvents can cause latent injuries that may not appear for years. Refrigerators are essentially air tight, so volatile chemicals can achieve higher concentrations in there.

Titebond is probably fine in the 'fridge, but if you must, make it the exception. I am more concerned about "any chemical products you use."
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post #10 of 13 Old 06-27-2018, 09:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Tool Agnostic View Post
Okay folks. I respect Steve a lot, but:

-> It is a bad idea to store chemicals in the refrigerator with food.

Even with the best sealed containers, don't take the risk. Cross-contamination from chemicals and solvents can cause latent injuries that may not appear for years. Refrigerators are essentially air tight, so volatile chemicals can achieve higher concentrations in there.

Titebond is probably fine in the 'fridge, but if you must, make it the exception. I am more concerned about "any chemical products you use."
In my defense I have a fridge in my shop that maybe has only a few sealed drinks in it but mostly paint and chemicals. There is no food in it at all.
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post #11 of 13 Old 06-28-2018, 11:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
In my defense I have a fridge in my shop that maybe has only a few sealed drinks in it but mostly paint and chemicals. There is no food in it at all.
Better, but I still don't like the idea. To me, your answer sounds like, "I don't smoke all the time. I have only one cigarette at the end of each working day. One cigarette won't hurt me." Sure, it is better than smoking three packs a day, but it will still lead to long term harm.

Although cross-contamination is less likely with a sealed beverage container (probably cans and plastic bottles), you still put your mouth to the outside. Small quantities of certain chemicals can cause short- and long-term health issues.

If I were using a refrigerator for paint and chemicals, I would label the outside with "skull and crossbones" and store all of the human-consumables elsewhere. That minor exposure doesn't have enough bad chemicals to hurt or kill you (or measure the injury, for that matter). It is the long term repeated exposure from small amounts of chemicals that does.

Addendum: In fairness to Steve, we are all exposed to chemicals throughout our normal day. It is a cost of our modern society. Hopefully humanity is working towards the goal of identifying and limiting our exposure to the danger as our knowledge grows.

Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 06-28-2018 at 12:08 PM.
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post #12 of 13 Old 06-28-2018, 08:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Tool Agnostic View Post
Better, but I still don't like the idea. To me, your answer sounds like, "I don't smoke all the time. I have only one cigarette at the end of each working day. One cigarette won't hurt me." Sure, it is better than smoking three packs a day, but it will still lead to long term harm.

Although cross-contamination is less likely with a sealed beverage container (probably cans and plastic bottles), you still put your mouth to the outside. Small quantities of certain chemicals can cause short- and long-term health issues.

If I were using a refrigerator for paint and chemicals, I would label the outside with "skull and crossbones" and store all of the human-consumables elsewhere. That minor exposure doesn't have enough bad chemicals to hurt or kill you (or measure the injury, for that matter). It is the long term repeated exposure from small amounts of chemicals that does.

Addendum: In fairness to Steve, we are all exposed to chemicals throughout our normal day. It is a cost of our modern society. Hopefully humanity is working towards the goal of identifying and limiting our exposure to the danger as our knowledge grows.
I don't understand where the contamination is suppose to come from. If all of the chemical containers are sealed I don't see how it can hurt you, especially wood glue. I think a person could drink a glass full of it and it wouldn't hurt you.
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post #13 of 13 Old 06-28-2018, 10:35 PM
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I don't understand where the contamination is suppose to come from. If all of the chemical containers are sealed I don't see how it can hurt you, especially wood glue. I think a person could drink a glass full of it and it wouldn't hurt you.
I am not referring to wood glue, which you can probably drink. I would add Koolaid powder to mask the flavor. ;-)

Even the best containers are not perfect. Chemicals, especially volatile solvents, can leak out over time, undetected. You don't want cross-contamination from that. Ever find a "sealed container" where half the contents had evaporated out? I have.

You are a grownup and can make your own decisions. All I can do is suggest that it isn't a good idea to store sealed chemicals with food, no matter how much you trust the seals. It is a risk that I would avoid, but to each their own.

I have made my point several times. We can agree to disagree. I am done with this thread.
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