Joining/Laminating Reclaimed wood tabletop - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 10 Old 03-30-2014, 11:42 AM Thread Starter
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Joining/Laminating Reclaimed wood tabletop

I am thinking about building a dinning room table, the top being made of reclaimed barn siding. The material that I have access to is apx 1x6. For the table top I would like to have 2 or 3 layers for thickness. I am looking for a nice tight smooth finished surface.

I am wondering if I staggered the boards gluing each layer, keeping the same orientation would be the best approach or what is a better way to build to the desired thickness?

Thanks
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post #2 of 10 Old 03-30-2014, 11:59 AM
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I've never seen smooth barnwood siding

So, what have you got? Most barnwood I've seen is really aged, dried, showing that the soft grain has been eroded away by sunlight and weather. Got any photos you can post...
use (Manage Attachments) button, (browse) your computer for the pictures, (select), click the (Upload) button in full screen .... and wait! Pictures will upload shortly.Close the attachment window and they will show in your post.

As far as how to make it, that depends. Several layers of barnwood would not be my choice. I would use a 3/4" plywood base, glue one layer of barnwood to it, trim out the edges in a 2" or so strip all around for the thicker look. The barnwood will probably be dry, but let it stand in the shop for a while, exposed on all sides to air movement to make certain.

The top usually be allowed to move across the width, but by attaching it to a plywood substrate minimizes or eliminates that issue.

The next issue, is how to achieve the smooth/tight look you mentioned. A glass top is one method. Any sanding or planing you do to make it smooth will remove all the character of the barnwood, you can't get there from here. An epoxy bar top finish could be floated over the entire table and you would still have the character, grain and color with an impervious finish. JMO

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 03-30-2014 at 12:28 PM. Reason: typo
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post #3 of 10 Old 03-30-2014, 12:09 PM
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We have an introduction section where you can say a few words about yourself. If you fill out your profile in your "User Control Panel", you can list any hobbies, experience or other facts. You can also list your general geographical location which would be a help in answering some questions. In doing that your location will show under your username when you post.










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post #4 of 10 Old 03-30-2014, 12:34 PM
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The barn wood would vary in thickness and be twisted and warped. You would have to face joint the boards on a jointer and surface them to a uniform dimension to laminate them together. It would be easier to glue up a top 3/4" thick and then put the multiple layers around the edges to make the edge thick. On the ends you would need to run the grain the same direction as the top because of wood movement.
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post #5 of 10 Old 03-30-2014, 12:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
I would use a 3/4" plywood base, glue one layer of barnwood to it, trim out the edges in a 2" or so strip all around for the thicker look.

The top usually be allowed to move across the width, but by attaching it to a plywood substrate minimizes or eliminates that issue.
Gluing the solid wood to the plywood eliminates the ability for the wood to move. Edging all around will also inhibit movement when across the endgrain boards.





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post #6 of 10 Old 03-31-2014, 02:43 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the information

As soon as I get the material pull from the barn I will post some pictures to show what I will be working with. I have planned to run the material through a plane just to square it up.

I like the idea of gluing it to the plywood, I was just worried about the material shrinking/expanding. Any suggestions or opinion on running the material across the width of top surface or running the boards length of the top. I am looking at a 4' x 8' top.

thanks again..
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post #7 of 10 Old 03-31-2014, 03:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by net_roamer View Post
As soon as I get the material pull from the barn I will post some pictures to show what I will be working with. I have planned to run the material through a plane just to square it up.

I like the idea of gluing it to the plywood, I was just worried about the material shrinking/expanding. Any suggestions or opinion on running the material across the width of top surface or running the boards length of the top. I am looking at a 4' x 8' top.

thanks again..
It's kind of a gamble gluing solid wood to plywood but on the other hand the barn wood should be so dry you might not have a issue with wood movement.
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post #8 of 10 Old 03-31-2014, 05:04 PM
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That was my point

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
It's kind of a gamble gluing solid wood to plywood but on the other hand the barn wood should be so dry you might not have a issue with wood movement.
The barnwood has gone through it's drying cycle by now. If the backside is sealed by the plywood and the front side is sealed by a finish of some sort, no moisture will be absorbed. JMO.

There are lots of articles on how wood moves in the drying process, but I can not find any which deals with how much a piece which has reached equlibrium and then sealed on both sides will move.

Great Articles on Wood Movement:

http://www.americanfurnituredsgn.com/wood_movement.htm

http://workshopcompanion.com/KnowHow...Wood_Grain.htm

http://www.thisiscarpentry.com/2010/...wood-movement/

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #9 of 10 Old 03-31-2014, 05:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
The barnwood has gone through it's drying cycle by now. If the backside is sealed by the plywood and the front side is sealed by a finish of some sort, no moisture will be absorbed. JMO.

There are lots of articles on how wood moves in the drying process, but I can not find any which deals with how much a piece which has reached equlibrium and then sealed on both sides will move.

Great Articles on Wood Movement:

http://www.americanfurnituredsgn.com/wood_movement.htm

http://workshopcompanion.com/KnowHow...Wood_Grain.htm

http://www.thisiscarpentry.com/2010/...wood-movement/
Yea but there is always humidity and the barn wood may move in a different direction than the plywood which isn't done drying.
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post #10 of 10 Old 03-31-2014, 05:38 PM
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IMO, wood never becomes movement free, no matter what is done to it. It can be slowed down a lot. It will never dry to the point of having no MC. Moisture will always be retained in the wood.

Once wood has been acclimated, it can react to moisture if moved, or if the ambient conditions change, to include temperature fluctuations. It doesn't take much of an opportunity for moisture vapor to get to the wood.

I wouldn't glue the lumber to the plywood.





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