Jet 18'' Bandsaw motor removal advice - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 16 Old 08-03-2015, 01:13 PM Thread Starter
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Jet 18'' Bandsaw motor removal advice

Hey guys, I'm looking for some advice on removing the motor on my jet bandsaw. The model number is JWBS-18. It seems my motor just isn't getting enough juice to power the blade. Even cutting through small pieces seems to strain the engine. I bought the saw used as part of a package last year. I have called a local motor shop and the guy there says he can take a look at it and possibly rebuild it if needed. Is there anything in particular I should pay attention to when removing the engine? Should i have him wire it for 220v ( the tag on the engine says 115/220v but has a sticker saying "wired for 115)

My father and I purchased a dvd on tuning up the bandsaw, and although the tune up seem to help it did not solve the problem.

Any advice is welcome and would help greatly
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post #2 of 16 Old 08-03-2015, 01:17 PM
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wire it for 220 V first

Before you remove it, rewire it for 220 V. That is probably all that it needs, and it's free! You will need a good 220v supply receptacle 20 Amps, should be fine, since it will draw less current on 220, than 110V.

Try it and post back with results.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #3 of 16 Old 08-03-2015, 02:11 PM
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did the power decrease from what it once was? or has it always been this way? is it coming up to normal speed?
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post #4 of 16 Old 08-03-2015, 02:53 PM
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If the motor turns on, it shouldn't need rebuilding, or even really repaired. There's a couple things you can check yourself before you go through the hassle of dismounting the motor and taking it to a shop. First, try a different outlet. It could be that there's something wrong with the present outlet that's keeping the motor from getting all the power that it needs. Secondly, take the belt off and try spinning the motor armeture by hand. It should be nice and smooth, if it feels gritty or has a hitch somewhere, it needs new bearings. That's a simple job, no need to take it to a shop if you own a screwdriver. Now try powering the motor without the belt. It should get up to speed pretty well, and you should hear a 'click' sound. If you don't hear that click, the starter winding switch isn't disengaging and that's why the motor doesn't seem to have enough power. Fixing that, unfortunately, is a job for a repair shop.

Since the motor runs, its not very likely that you have a dead capacitor or damaged windings, so its probably something simple. I should also not, this advise all assumes your bandsaw is properly set up. If, say, the blade guides are mis-aligned and pinching the blade, the motor won't have enough starting torque to get everything moving, so check the basic setup too

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post #5 of 16 Old 08-04-2015, 08:30 PM Thread Starter
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I took it to a local electrical motor repair guy and the motor is perfect but one thing he noticed was that it was wired for 230v with a 115v output (the plug that goes into the wall) so he said when I hook the motor back on to saw to follow the diagram for the 115v. Im going to hook it back up tomorrow and ill let you know how it goes
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post #6 of 16 Old 08-04-2015, 09:56 PM
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It sounds like you got the problem figured out. I have the same saw. It has adequate power on 110 volt, but don't expect it to cut with the big boy saws that are 5 or more hp. Make sure the belt isn't slipping. When I first got my saw it bogged down really easy. I figured out the belt was slipping, and I tightened it up. It cuts much better now.
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post #7 of 16 Old 08-06-2015, 07:40 PM Thread Starter
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well she runs like a well oiled machine. all problems solved, thanks again guys
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post #8 of 16 Old 08-06-2015, 09:28 PM
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run yourself a 220 line and change the plug to a 220 plug. it will draw fewer amps leaving more power for other tools.

there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.
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post #9 of 16 Old 08-06-2015, 09:35 PM
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that's what I said....

Quote:
Originally Posted by toolguy1000 View Post
run yourself a 220 line and change the plug to a 220 plug. it will draw fewer amps leaving more power for other tools.
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
Before you remove it, rewire it for 220 V. That is probably all that it needs, and it's free! You will need a good 220v supply receptacle 20 Amps, should be fine, since it will draw less current on 220, than 110V.

Try it and post back with results.
All shops should have at least one 220v receptacle. I probably have 12 of them. Anything over 2 HP will run way better on 220v than 110 v and the wire can be 12 GA.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #10 of 16 Old 08-07-2015, 07:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toolguy1000 View Post
run yourself a 220 line and change the plug to a 220 plug. it will draw fewer amps leaving more power for other tools.
with due respect toolguy, converting a load from 120vac to 240vac will draw the same amount of total current (it will draw 1/2 of total on each hot wire). so there will not be more remaining current in the power distribution circuits.
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post #11 of 16 Old 08-07-2015, 11:11 AM
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Ain't it all about watts?

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with due respect toolguy, converting a load from 120vac to 240vac will draw the same amount of total current (it will draw 1/2 of total on each hot wire). so there will not be more remaining current in the power distribution circuits.

For example: A motor that runs on 120V at 10 AMPS would be the same wattage as 240V at 5 AMPS, right? The watts are the same for each, 1200 watts. Are you saying that each 240 wire would carry 2.5 AMPS? Or is the current measured between the neutral and the hots?
I'm confused.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #12 of 16 Old 08-07-2015, 02:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimPa View Post
with due respect toolguy, converting a load from 120vac to 240vac will draw the same amount of total current (it will draw 1/2 of total on each hot wire). so there will not be more remaining current in the power distribution circuits.
With due respect again toolguy, I apologize as my head was on watts (thanks Bill) and not on amps. you will have 2 hot wires both carrying 5 amps, instead of one hot wire carrying 10 amps, as in Bills example.
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post #13 of 16 Old 08-07-2015, 04:50 PM Thread Starter
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I have 220v in my shop. The band saw originally came with and still has a 115v output (the plug that goes into the wall.) When I took it to the repair man he said that the owner before had the wire cover rewired for 220, but it pointless because the 115v three prong plug is still on the saw. The previous owner had also given me a 115v to 220v wire adapter. The repair man said it is still pointless because the saw has a 115v output.
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post #14 of 16 Old 08-07-2015, 11:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Domenic Dinezio View Post
I have 220v in my shop. The band saw originally came with and still has a 115v output (the plug that goes into the wall.) When I took it to the repair man he said that the owner before had the wire cover rewired for 220, but it pointless because the 115v three prong plug is still on the saw. The previous owner had also given me a 115v to 220v wire adapter. The repair man said it is still pointless because the saw has a 115v output.
Are you saying that instead of replacing the 110V plug on the cord when it was converted to 220V the seller gave you an adapter to use the 110V plug in a 220V outlet?

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post #15 of 16 Old 08-09-2015, 11:05 AM
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quote deleted

there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

Last edited by toolguy1000; 08-09-2015 at 11:20 AM.
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post #16 of 16 Old 08-09-2015, 11:23 AM
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watts are watts, but...windings are the key

I pasted this from Practical Machinists site:
http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...0-110-a-83411/
Quoting:
"This keeps coming up, doesn't it....?

In point of fact, 220 is cheaper IF you happen to have a long line from the meter back a few hundred yards into the woods.

Otherwise, cost is so nearly the same as to make it of no interest to convert.

The higher voltage does require less current, so losses in the wiring, if they are significant, are less with 220.

But inside the motor, the same exact current goes through each wire no matter whether it is set up for "110" or "220".

In once case, it goes thru two parallel windings, so of the 10A coming in for 110, it splits so 5 goes thru each of two 110V windings.

At 220, 5A goes thru one and then the other, in series, two 110V windings adding to 220V.

Net result is same copper losses in either case, +- almost nothing."



That is where the difference is it seems to me.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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