Jet 12" Jointer/Planer? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 10 Old 11-27-2019, 01:27 PM Thread Starter
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Jet 12" Jointer/Planer?

I see Rockler has a sale on the Jet 12" Jointer/Planer $2379 a saving of $420 AND free shipping. It looks really good. Being a newbie I actually didn't realize that you would joint the flat surface of a board. I always thought you only ran the edges through until I was watching the video on the product and saw them jointing the flat surface.
Is it smarter to get a dedicated 12/13" planer and a 6 or 8" jointer or get this combination tool. I like the cabinet, dust collection and the 3hp, 230v Thoughts?
Thanks, BillF

BillF
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post #2 of 10 Old 11-27-2019, 08:06 PM
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BillF,
If you have the space a separate joiner and planer are ideal. I have the Grizzly and it takes all of 3 minutes to go between J & P. But is a PITA. The price that you mentioned is about what I paid for my Grizzly about 5 years ago but mine has the square carbide knives in a spiral pattern.

Dust collection on any combination is probably not the best.

On a joiner, the wider the cutter head and the longer the tables the better the joiner will perform.

The HUGE advantage of the combination is that the joiner can do wide face grain. Yes, you will find pieces wider than 12 inches that you need to face joint. And no, just a wider planer won't solve the problem.

Rich
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post #3 of 10 Old 11-27-2019, 10:40 PM Thread Starter
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If you need to face joint couldn't you put it through the planer and just barely take any material off?

BillF
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post #4 of 10 Old 11-28-2019, 01:15 AM
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A planer will give you two parallel faces. A jointer gives you one flat and straight face. With that face against the fence you can make an edge square to the face and straight. Then it goes through the planer so that both faces are parallel and eventually to the appropriate thickness.

Rich
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post #5 of 10 Old 11-28-2019, 10:51 AM
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Note: Quotes below are in reverse order.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NoThankyou View Post
A planer will give you two parallel faces. A jointer gives you one flat and straight face. With that face against the fence you can make an edge square to the face and straight. Then it goes through the planer so that both faces are parallel and eventually to the appropriate thickness.
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Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
If you need to face joint couldn't you put it through the planer and just barely take any material off?
Yes. You can face joint on your planer to get a flat face, as long as the underside of the board is flat.

If the underside of the board is not flat, then the board may move as passes through the planer. There are solutions to that issue. In some cases, you can put the board and a sled and support it so that it does not move as it passes through the planer.

You got a perfectly flat face with your planer, but now the question is, "How do you joint the edge?"

You may have forgotten that a jointer has something extra that a planer does not have: A perfect 90 degree fence. You use that fence on the jointer to help you make that perfectly straight, perfectly square 90 degree edge on the side of the board.

How do you get a perfectly straight, flat, 90 degree edge on your flat board if you have a planer, but no jointer? Most people use a table saw as a substitute, but that has its own issues.

In theory, you install a blade that makes very clean rip cuts, set it to a perfect 90 degrees with respect to the table, lay your new flat side of your board on the table, set the rip fence, and trim off the ragged edge, leaving a perfectly straight, smooth, square 90 degree edge.

The problems appear if the OTHER edge of the board is not straight. If you put that non-straight edge against the fence, then the board may shift as the non-straight edge goes past the end of the fence. That can be very dangerous, and could easily lead to a kickback. The solution is to make and use a "jointer sled", and you still have the question of how clean an edge the table saw can leave on the board. Some people choose special "glue line rip blades" to get a cleaner cut.

There are other solutions to squaring an edge:

* Use a router table. Some people make an economic jointer by setting the infeed and outfeed fences with a slight difference, like a jointer. The rotating router bit acts like jointer blades. It does not have the ease of use or precision of a true jointer, but it works for short pieces. Router table fences and tables are not large, so jointing a long board has its own issues.

* Use a hand plane. Clamp the board and plane it by hand. This requires skill, and acquiring that skill requires a lot of practice. I have tried it many times, but I am not close. Simply holding a hand plane square along a long board is not easy. Planing straight is not easy, either.

* Use a hand plane. Construct a shooting board or build a jig to keep the board at right angles to the hand plane. The hand plane has a 90 degree side to help align it for the shooting board or jig.

* Etc.

Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 11-28-2019 at 10:53 AM.
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post #6 of 10 Old 11-28-2019, 12:04 PM
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Maybe I can explain a easier way. A planer will only make the face as flat as the face of the board lieng on the planer bed going thru it.

Thats the reason you face joint the stock is to flaten the 1 face to go thru the jointer.

Try buying your timber S2S straight lined ripped.

thats surfaced 2 sides and one good edge so you can edge joint using a jointer.

just be sure the timber is flat/straight. Before buying a piece of timber look down the edge of it to ensure its not bowed or twisted before buying that piece.
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post #7 of 10 Old 11-28-2019, 04:49 PM Thread Starter
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I'm very thankful for all the great answers, and glad I asked the question as I learned things I didn't know. So researching the Jet I see some so-so reviews so I'm looking at the Dewalt DW735X which is 1" wider and keeping my Jet 8" jointer/planer to joint. The Dewalt has excellent reviews and is way more resonable. I guess I can always if I need a piece of wood face jointed that;s wider than 8" I can rip and then glue it after face jointing.
Thanks guys for the great input, and if you have any thoughts on this latest plan feel free. BillF

BillF
post #8 of 10 Old 11-30-2019, 12:02 AM
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Bill,
Just a tip. When you need to glue up to make a wider board do the following.
Joint one edge with the good face against the fence. With chalk, mark the face I next to the edge.
With the second piece joint one edge with the good face away from the fence. Mark the face O.

Glue up the I and O together. You say: "Why?" That eliminates any 'Not Exactly 90' setting of the fence. And should you ever get to the point of setting the jointer fence exactly, precisely, perfectly at 90, please share the technique.
FrankC likes this.

Rich
In furniture 1/32" is a Grand Canyon
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post #9 of 10 Old 11-30-2019, 02:17 AM Thread Starter
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Ok, I think I'm getting the Dewalt 735-X for sure now. I checked with my only hardwood retailer, Peterman Lumber's Las Vegas location and all the hardwood they sell is S3S so I'll go with the plan of using my 8" Jet Jointer/Planer for jointing only and the Dewalt for all planing. Thanks again everyone. BillF

BillF
post #10 of 10 Old 11-30-2019, 02:18 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoThankyou View Post
Bill,
Just a tip. When you need to glue up to make a wider board do the following.
Joint one edge with the good face against the fence. With chalk, mark the face I next to the edge.
With the second piece joint one edge with the good face away from the fence. Mark the face O.

Glue up the I and O together. You say: "Why?" That eliminates any 'Not Exactly 90' setting of the fence. And should you ever get to the point of setting the jointer fence exactly, precisely, perfectly at 90, please share the technique.

Thanks, I have saved this tip!

BillF
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