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wolfgang953 07-02-2019 04:28 PM

Internal window instalation question
 
Does anyone know how to install a window that can walk me through this? Iv read several articals and watched several videos but none are the same type of application as mine. - I was going to see about hiring someone to do it, but its only one small window and noone ever wants to do a job that small. (an issue i faced at my last place as well.)


https://www.homedepot.com/p/American...BUCK/203157488


^that is the window. And its far to late to return it.


Now i could screw it in and caulk the hell out of it, but im guessing there should be a bit more care in installing it then that.

This window is going in an INTERNAL wall in my basement. So there is no real outside exposure. No rain and such. Its being put in for ventilation. - That being said, the room needs to be temperature controlled (cold). So i need to install it so that theirs no mass air loss.



The window is listed as 31x19. There is still a space gap on the sides for positioning. And much more space vertically.

https://i.imgur.com/XOgNHdj.jpg



Iv never put in a window before. Im not sure why i always envisioned the window fitting perfectly over a 2x4 and drywall. Thats clearly not the case. The window itself is jsut a hair thinner then the width of a 2x4. You can see in this pic, the bottom of the window and a 2x4 (for references sake) (The flash ended up making it a bit brighter then i intended)



https://i.imgur.com/81rk8Nj.jpg



But if i put the front of the window flush with the inside drywall, then there is a larger gap behind it. (Both sides of the wall are accessible.)
https://i.imgur.com/UvoXjP3.jpg

So im really not sure how to go about this.. in the most correct manner then ill be able to.. if that makes sense.

Not sure where to position it across the 2x4/drywall. And what to do after that.
I do have roll insulation, spray foam insulation, caulking, 2x4s, shims, and other random things from my basement project. Hopefully i wont need anything i dont have.



The package only came with the window and, some screw, and two pieces of plastic.
https://i.imgur.com/VFLDDEW.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/l579R3p.jpg



So if anyone is able to help me with how to install this thing as properly as i can, i would be very grateful.

Terry Q 07-02-2019 06:19 PM

Start by looking for the rough-in size on the product page. Rough-in the opening to the suggested size.

The “outside” with the flange sits flush against the wall, the inside requires a jamb extension, which you need to make and is common practice. Should be videos on how to do this. You will have to do some drywalling or trim to fix the wall first to fit the new opening.

Normally the window is leveled in the rough-in opening. Screw through the outside flange to hold it in place. Trim it out and done.




In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.

Steve Neul 07-02-2019 11:13 PM

Difficult to help you online. Every window manufacturer makes their windows different. Look the window over and see if there is any holes in the frame to mount it. It might be hidden behind that rubber weather strip.

The company may also have online instructions that would be helpful.

gmercer_48083 07-03-2019 10:19 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Here are the installation instructions.

TimPa 07-03-2019 12:28 PM

i believe that your confusion is coming from the fact that it is a "replacement" window, and you are attempting a "new construction" installation. you will need to build up the opening to the window size (go by the flange height and width) +1/4". are the interior flange and the exterior flange the same dimensions? the exterior looks bigger??

typically the window will sit in a 3 1/4" deep "pocket", resting up against a brickmould (or other trim element) on the exterior, which protrudes into the rough opening maybe 3/8" - 1/2" on sides and top. you would place a bead of calk around that interior lip and place the window frame against it. i remove the sliders for that step for ease. then 2 screws on each side (likely pre-drilled holes in frame - one high one low). re-install sliders and loosen/tighten the 4 screws to achieve frame squareness as you slide windows back and forth observing the gaps.

i don't see a sill yet, but the extra thin piece snaps into the bottom exterior of the window, and is trimmed to fit the angle/position of the sill. when all done, on the outside place a bead of caulk around the entire window where it meets the house.

wolfgang953 07-03-2019 01:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steve Neul (Post 2061099)
The company may also have online instructions that would be helpful.


Forgot to add that in OP. It does come with a link printed on it for getting to that windows instillation instructions.

... ... unfortunately the link doesnt work'





Quote:

Originally Posted by gmercer_48083 (Post 2061129)
Here are the installation instructions.


Thanks. I was searching for them for a while. But i eventually got to a page on there site but it contained like 6 different sets of instructions. And some were labeled exactly the same as each other. Was quite irritating.

wolfgang953 07-03-2019 01:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TimPa (Post 2061141)
i believe that your confusion is coming from the fact that it is a "replacement" window, and you are attempting a "new construction" installation. you will need to build up the opening to the window size (go by the flange height and width) +1/4". are the interior flange and the exterior flange the same dimensions? the exterior looks bigger??


Yea, i realized that a bit to late. I really didnt think that one through. - This is an internal wall built inside the basement. Directly behind where this window will go is another window in the cinder blocks that vents to the outside. So i was thinking id grab the same window, line it up. And that would serve as a semi way to vent out the room if needed. So i grabbed the same window (last novemberish). At which time i still had a million other things to do with that room and in life. So i guess i really just didnt think it through all the way. But its far to late to return it now.


Im not sure which part the flange is honestly. While i may have had an extreme basic understanding of some wood/construction to muddle my way through making the room (with everyone heres help of course); i dont know a damn thing about windows.



Im guessing the flange part is the plastic bit that sticks out all around the window, on the front, and on the back. And if that is true, then you are right about them being different sizes. Part of what initially threw me off when i opened it.

*** just took a closer look at it while i was measuring it. Turns out they are actually the same size. Both sides are 30.75" x 18.25"
Looks like what threw it off was that the window is tilted in its construction. You can see in this picture how the plastic in between (what im assuming is) the flanges is angled.

https://i.imgur.com/oaJ4xc8.jpg

wolfgang953 07-03-2019 01:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TimPa (Post 2061141)
i don't see a sill yet, but the extra thin piece snaps into the bottom exterior of the window, and is trimmed to fit the angle/position of the sill. when all done, on the outside place a bead of caulk around the entire window where it meets the house.

Do i need a sill? I dont care how this looks on bit. Its a room for pets. I just need the window to be installed right so im not losing cold air out of the room.

TimPa 07-03-2019 01:59 PM

yeah, re-read your title, my bad. of course no sill required. you just need to build up the rough opening as mentioned, and build a 3 1/4" wide pocket for the window to sit in. wood trim all around to hold it in place.

wolfgang953 07-03-2019 02:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TimPa (Post 2061169)
yeah, re-read your title, my bad. of course no sill required. you just need to build up the rough opening as mentioned, and build a 3 1/4" wide pocket for the window to sit in. wood trim all around to hold it in place.

After the space is built to the rough opening size;
So should i put the window flush with the drywall on the inside of the room? And make some kind of wood stop to nail in on the backside of it? (picture is of the outside of the room with the window flush on the inside.)
https://i.imgur.com/UvoXjP3.jpg

And use a wood 'trim' on the inside of the room as a stop for the front?

TimPa 07-03-2019 02:44 PM

you could make it flush on one face interior or exterior doesn't matter since it is inside. or you can center it in the wall by making some trim that has an "L" shaped profile, to hold it in...

wolfgang953 07-03-2019 03:05 PM

Thank you.
The 2x4 is only a hair wider then the window. (As you can see in the 2nd OP pic) So most of that room, if the window were centered, would just be the width of the drywall. (3/4"). Im thinking flush in the front with a simple stop in the back would be more simple (And cheaper.) And i can make a 'trim' for the front out of left over wood i have. I have one 1" thick common - [3/4"] wood i use for my animals that i could likely shape to fit that.


Could i use a square dowel rod as a stop in the back? They are already square shaped and come in 1/2", 3/4", 1", as well as 5/8" and 3/8". Easy to cut to length. (im used to getting the poplar circle dowel for my pets.) Since its an inside window it probably doesnt need to be full on wind blowing strong. As long as i could nail it in with finishing nails and not split it.


https://mobileimages.lowes.com/produ...5_07644648.jpg




Two questions regarding some things i read about installation. Do i need some kind of gap between that wood stop and the window? I read some articals saying they should be right up against each other. And others saying there should be a small gap between the two.
On that same note; if i used a wood stop on the back side of the window as i was thinking about, would i caulk around that from the outside or the inside? I read one artical that said to caulk it form the inside. Which seems like that would make it hard to put the window flush against the wood stop. (Unless that creates the gap they were talking about?)

TimPa 07-05-2019 07:03 AM

no gaps required. caulking not critical, as this is an internal window, caulk inside, outside or both. you are just looking for an air seal. any method you find for the trimming out is fine also. many options and shown on line.

personally i build my window trim on the bench - much like a picture frame (if i am not building in stools/aprons) - and install it as one piece. as you said, you will need an extension jamb (filler) piece to make up the difference (4 1/2" - 3 1/4" = 1 1/4")

wolfgang953 07-21-2019 04:01 PM

Sorry for bumping this after a while. I had intended on finishing this sooner. But unfortunately, my hand had a unfavorable encounter with a table saw. So yea.. i havnt been doing much of anything recently.


But before that happened..



The window is listed as a 31"x19"
with a RO needed of 31.5" x 19.5"
So i filled in the opening with some wood until it was exactly that amount. Then added some drywall scrap to cover it.


https://i.imgur.com/Op7LQM4.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/peRgqXH.jpg



My question is, once the stops are put in, its shimmed and leveled, and the screws for the window into the wood are in place, Should i add a minimally expanding spray foam insulation on the side edges? Since there is the gap of the RO itself and the gap between the window end and the end of the windows plastic trim in the front? - Im guessing leaving it wide open with nothing isnt a great idea. And its probably to small a space on the sides to add regular batt insulation (unless you smashed it in, which is no good.)



https://i.imgur.com/4eT2ude.jpg?1

woodnthings 07-21-2019 04:20 PM

Typically, windows are push outwards ...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by wolfgang953 (Post 2061171)
After the space is built to the rough opening size;
So should i put the window flush with the drywall on the inside of the room? And make some kind of wood stop to nail in on the backside of it? (picture is of the outside of the room with the window flush on the inside.)


And use a wood 'trim' on the inside of the room as a stop for the front?


The widow should be pushed out against a trim piece which will make it flush with the siding. This keep the water intrusion as far outboard as possible and it's easy to trim out from the inside with wider pieces. That's my method and it works well for me. :vs_cool:

wolfgang953 07-21-2019 04:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by woodnthings (Post 2063207)
The widow should be pushed out against a trim piece which will make it flush with the siding. This keep the water intrusion as far outboard as possible and it's easy to trim out from the inside with wider pieces. That's my method and it works well for me. :vs_cool:

its an internal window in the basement. No direct access to water/rain. Its just there to be able to vent the room some. But i need to be able to keep cold in the room, hence wondering about the insulating the edges.

TimPa 07-22-2019 07:04 AM

as you can see there is a strip of foam that begins to insulate the window/r.o. gap. typically, i stuff loose batt fiberglass insulation in the gap with a putty knife - loosely! then i close it up. being an interior window, this is much less a requirement. a bead of caulk around the window/trim joint will also go far to seal it off for you.

Onefreetexan 07-23-2019 09:56 PM

Wolfgang,,, don’t wish to sound rude here, but what you need. Is sit down,, gather your thoughts, and with a piece of paper and a pencil,, slowly and very carefully gather all your thoughts,,, think this WHOLE project through very carefully and then proceed... instead of attacking it in bits and pieces like you have been,.

gj13us 07-24-2019 12:58 PM

You could always just use some . . . .duct tape. I made interior windows to help seal off the drafty glass louver windows in my basement in winter. The interior wall openings aren't square so I used insulating foam tape and duct tape to cover the gaps.

The moral of the story is: Your room looks great and you shouldn't cut corners as you get to the end, but don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good enough.

wolfgang953 07-24-2019 04:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Onefreetexan (Post 2063437)
Wolfgang,,, don’t wish to sound rude here, but what you need. Is sit down,, gather your thoughts, and with a piece of paper and a pencil,, slowly and very carefully gather all your thoughts,,, think this WHOLE project through very carefully and then proceed... instead of attacking it in bits and pieces like you have been,.


I did sit down and think this through. At least as best as i could. Having never done anything like my project before i was starting from square one on figuring how how to do this. Considering what had to be torn down, removed, cleaned 10 times over, and repair just to get the basement to normal conditions.. you could even argue that it was less then square one.


But considering how much is involved in a project like constructing a room from scratch, from all the prep, to designing and planning.. every little detail.. yea, i had a ton of questions. So yea, iv had a lot of threads over the last 2 years. Some with general inquires and some with more specific question (such as this one about the window.) Its way to big a discussion to do all in one thread.Many ppl dont even eve like checking back two replies for updates in the thread, much less sifting through 2 years of questions in a single thread.


And i actually did sit down draw and mark everything out. But practice is always a bit different then theory/plans. So things came up. And id rather ask about it at the time then find out later i screwed something up massively.


All that being said.. the room is nearly done now. All's thats left is the window, the door, and some work with the duct for the portable AC. After which i think the room will be ready for testing its ability to hold the cold air in. - Putting in the door shouldnt be to hard, and the duct work is almost done. So this should be the last big topic (im hoping at least.)


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