Incra LS Positioner? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 12 Old 01-11-2020, 02:31 AM Thread Starter
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Incra LS Positioner?

Anyone have one? How do you like it, and what size travel did you get and why? It looks like that paired with the Incra table and dust box is a really top notch setup a person could grow into.

BillF
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post #2 of 12 Old 01-11-2020, 07:01 AM
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My brother uses his for dovetails, rather than a Leigh, etc. jig. He gave me his first one when he upgraded and I like it, but haven't really explored use of the various scales or really the lead screw. Due to the size of my router table top limiting the location of the fence base, the farthest the fence can be from the router axis is ~2", so that is limiting.
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post #3 of 12 Old 01-11-2020, 10:42 AM
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Iíve been using an LS positioner for five years or more. It is unlike any router fence on the market and allows you to use your router table for more than edge profiling, rabbets and dado. It allows you to make intricate joinery. As I recall there are templates for over 60 box and dovetail joints and you can add more by buying their book, which guides you through dozens of different projects that would be impossible to do with a standard router fence.

Once you start using the positioner for joinery there is a bit of learning curve and it takes practice.

As for the size, I bought the 25 inch but have only used the expanded capabilities once in all the years Iíve owned it. The 17 inch allows you to make boxes with sides almost 17 inches tall and thatís plenty big enough for my woodworking.

You will need to make or buy a new router table to go with the positioner, it wonít fit on a standard size table, and trying to make an extension off an existing table, like they show in their instructions, makes the router table unbalanced and tippy.


Now for the one major DRAWBACK of the Indra LS positioner. When making dovetails, you have to very accurately control the thickness of your board requiring a thickness planer and lots of trial cuts to get a perfect fit. This is different from any other dovetail jig Iíve used in that when using those jigs the thickness of the board doesnít matter. With the positioner, the size of the dovetail BIT you use determines the thickness of your lumber you use.

I love my LS Positioner and can answer about any question you might have.
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post #4 of 12 Old 01-12-2020, 02:58 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Q View Post
Iíve been using an LS positioner for five years or more. It is unlike any router fence on the market and allows you to use your router table for more than edge profiling, rabbets and dado. It allows you to make intricate joinery. As I recall there are templates for over 60 box and dovetail joints and you can add more by buying their book, which guides you through dozens of different projects that would be impossible to do with a standard router fence.

Once you start using the positioner for joinery there is a bit of learning curve and it takes practice.

As for the size, I bought the 25 inch but have only used the expanded capabilities once in all the years Iíve owned it. The 17 inch allows you to make boxes with sides almost 17 inches tall and thatís plenty big enough for my woodworking.

You will need to make or buy a new router table to go with the positioner, it wonít fit on a standard size table, and trying to make an extension off an existing table, like they show in their instructions, makes the router table unbalanced and tippy.


Now for the one major DRAWBACK of the Indra LS positioner. When making dovetails, you have to very accurately control the thickness of your board requiring a thickness planer and lots of trial cuts to get a perfect fit. This is different from any other dovetail jig Iíve used in that when using those jigs the thickness of the board doesnít matter. With the positioner, the size of the dovetail BIT you use determines the thickness of your lumber you use.

I love my LS Positioner and can answer about any question you might have.

Thanks! I do have a Dewalt 735 planer so that part is ok. I don't understand how the bit controls what thickness of wood you can use. So if I had a piece of 3/4 walnut for instance I couldn't just decide to use it without planing it down to a specific thickness?

BillF
post #5 of 12 Old 01-12-2020, 09:05 AM
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Thanks! I do have a Dewalt 735 planer so that part is ok. I don't understand how the bit controls what thickness of wood you can use. So if I had a piece of 3/4 walnut for instance I couldn't just decide to use it without planing it down to a specific thickness?


That is correct. Watch the second video on Incraís website on how to cut them and he explains planing your board to the bit height after you determine proper fit with test cuts.

I guess the second thing I forgot to mention is you need precise control of bit height adjustment so a router lift is required; Triton type through the base routers arenít accurate enough.

https://incra.com/router_table_fence...ositiners.html
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post #6 of 12 Old 01-13-2020, 02:47 AM Thread Starter
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That is correct. Watch the second video on Incraís website on how to cut them and he explains planing your board to the bit height after you determine proper fit with test cuts.

I guess the second thing I forgot to mention is you need precise control of bit height adjustment so a router lift is required; Triton type through the base routers arenít accurate enough.

https://incra.com/router_table_fence...ositiners.html

Thanks for the link Terry. I watched it and it's a great "how to" although it does appear it's going to be a real learning curve to put it mildly. BillF

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post #7 of 12 Old 01-13-2020, 08:41 AM
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I dont Name:  AAA07FF7-9971-408B-B31E-A3FD00159145_1578919232383.jpg
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Size:  368.3 KBName:  AAA07FF7-9971-408B-B31E-A3FD00159145_1578919232383.jpg
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Size:  368.3 KBhave the Incra router setup......yet. I do have the 52” Tablesaw fence with the LS positioner On my Grizzly G01023RLWX and I love it. The accuracy and repeatability is fantastic.
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WAOM
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post #8 of 12 Old 01-13-2020, 11:31 AM
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After using an Incra LS Positioner fence on my router table I decided I liked it so much I bought one for my table saw even though my table saw fence was as good as a standard fence gets.

Once set up properly, you can rip a two inch slice, set fence to three inches, cut a slice, move to five inches, cut a slice, move to ten inches, cut a slice and the lay the two inch, three inch and five inch pieces on top of the ten inch and it will be an exact fit.

Cut a piece one day to an exact size, go back a few days later, set the fence to the same size and it will be exactly the same size. No need to cut all your pieces at the same time.

The Incra table saw fence allows for different approaches when doing woodworking. Take for example ripping thin strips. Lots of people have different approaches and different jigs to make it safe, but the Incra fence is safest of all. Take a wide board, any width, rip it to a 1/32 marking on the fence. Subtract the kerf width and desired width of thin piece, as thin as 1/32 inch, and rip your thin piece off the wide board. Move the fence the same amount to make additional pieces.

There is a downside to the Incra table saw fence, and that is it takes up space on your table saw top, so you can no longer use the table saw for finishing work or piling it full of stuff.
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post #9 of 12 Old 01-14-2020, 07:41 AM
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you can no longer use the table saw for or piling it full of stuff.
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post #10 of 12 Old 01-14-2020, 12:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Q View Post
After using an Incra LS Positioner fence on my router table I decided I liked it so much I bought one for my table saw even though my table saw fence was as good as a standard fence gets.

Once set up properly, you can rip a two inch slice, set fence to three inches, cut a slice, move to five inches, cut a slice, move to ten inches, cut a slice and the lay the two inch, three inch and five inch pieces on top of the ten inch and it will be an exact fit.

Cut a piece one day to an exact size, go back a few days later, set the fence to the same size and it will be exactly the same size. No need to cut all your pieces at the same time.

The Incra table saw fence allows for different approaches when doing woodworking. Take for example ripping thin strips. Lots of people have different approaches and different jigs to make it safe, but the Incra fence is safest of all. Take a wide board, any width, rip it to a 1/32 marking on the fence. Subtract the kerf width and desired width of thin piece, as thin as 1/32 inch, and rip your thin piece off the wide board. Move the fence the same amount to make additional pieces.

There is a downside to the Incra table saw fence, and that is it takes up space on your table saw top, so you can no longer use the table saw for finishing work or piling it full of stuff.
Do you have wood move after you cut it? I have had it move on me. I was cutting some wooden strips 1 1/4" wide and the wood was 3/4" thick. After a few days, some of the strips had twisted. This is common so make sure you cut a little bigger the first time then go back and cut to your final width.

Don in Murfreesboro, TN.
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post #11 of 12 Old 01-14-2020, 10:07 PM
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Do you have wood move after you cut it? I have had it move on me. I was cutting some wooden strips 1 1/4" wide and the wood was 3/4" thick. After a few days, some of the strips had twisted. This is common so make sure you cut a little bigger the first time then go back and cut to your final width.


If I cut wood strips and they twist to the point they need further processing after a couple days, then Iíll probably cut new strips, because whatever stress is in the wood causing it to twist isnít going away just because you jointed and planed a few days later.

When I encounter bad behaving boards I cut out the big stresses (usually caused by nearby knots) and use whatís left for smaller parts or secondary wood where it wonít cause an issue.
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post #12 of 12 Old 01-15-2020, 03:01 AM Thread Starter
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Hey Terry, ordered my LS-Positioner 17" and I chose to just get it all since it seems like it is designed to work with each piece as a package most effectively. Table, fence, chip box, switch, and wheels. They estimate about 10 weeks.

BillF
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