If you only had one woodworking tool? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 39 Old 02-14-2020, 05:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony B View Post
Actually, a bottle opener with the other end being a can opener was actually referred to as a a 'church key' when I was growing up. Anyway, it's found in just about every boat owners tool box.
It is commonly used to repair splits and cracks in wood and fiberglass. Just run the can opener end down the crack. It will widen the crack and leave the new "V" shaped split/crack with a rough surface. Makes a better surface for accepting epoxy with or without sawdust.
Not fair, that is a multi-tool.
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post #22 of 39 Old 02-14-2020, 08:28 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Shop_Rat View Post
Sorry, didn't put down my reasoning as asked in the OP.

I actually did have only one tool many years ago- and that was my radial arm saw. I managed to turn out some pretty decent projects with a rule, pencil, saw and hammer. That one power tool ripped, crosscut and made edge decorations on my cabinetry. It also raised the panels for the doors, made rudimentary rails and styles, and created cove moldings for the trim.

Granted, it took some longer than if I had had all the dedicated tools, and the finished project may have looked a bit more elementary than if I had access to shapers or routers, but I didn't have the money for a building full of tools at the time. With a RAS and a little imagination, along with careful setups, you can safely make many shapes and cuts in a chunk of lumber.

Oh, and a bottle opener is an extremely poor woodworking tool. It only hacks up the surface of the wood, no matter how much pressure or finesse you execute while drawing it. A can opener can at least make a groove!
An old dewalt RAS is on the list of tools to get, I dont know if you have seen John Heiss' YT videos but his set up with 3 older dewalts along one wall is awesome. One set to crosscut and one set for dados.

I completely understand the combination tool vs dedicated tool struggle. My great grandfather only had his shopsmith in a 1 car garage and he still could park in it. Did his work and pushed it all against the wall when he was done. I still have that same shopsmith but also 3 generations of woodworkers later and the trickle down routine, I ended up have every dedicated machine that the shopsmith can turn into, much easier than spending the setup time with a combination tool, but that was all he had to work with and he made some great pieces with it.
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post #23 of 39 Old 02-15-2020, 11:58 PM
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Just one tool?????

OK. A pair of handcuffs to keep SWMBO out of the shop.

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post #24 of 39 Old 02-21-2020, 12:00 AM
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A tablesaw.
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post #25 of 39 Old 02-21-2020, 02:30 AM
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I started a very successful furniture business in Mill Valley Ca, with nothing but my fathers crappy Crafstman jigsaw, and a surform for rounding edges. I used this jig saw and hand filed, sanded the edges of my first year of furniture making. I eventually moved my shop to Sauasalito. This was 1972, and I have one of my original chairs - it's a bit embarassing as the finish is crude, but tmy furniture rustic as it was sold well enough until I learned how to do woodworking. Then I learned how to join wodd, and do fairly nice woodworking. I was not an accomplished woodworker, just had some cool designs. I still use jigsaws to cut a lot of different wood projects, as my battery powered Ryobi can cut through a 2X4 through the 4" side without going out of plane. It keeps me from hauling around my mitre saw.
If I were building a house, I would choose a skill saw, but I did build a two story house with my crew using nothing but a hand saw. We could not get temp power for 3 weeks, and generators were not readily available. The power company came out and took pictures of us building with just a hand saw, but didn't hurry to give us power. We framed the house and dried it in in about two weeks with me sawing every stud, joist, and plywood piece of wood.
I am not crazy about using human powered hand tools, but I can use them. I admire people who can chop a bowl with an adze
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post #26 of 39 Old 02-21-2020, 09:30 AM
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A good vintage handsaw.

You fellas rely too much on power tools.

A nice vintage hatchet would do as well, you can also use it to scrape, smooth, plane, and chisel.
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post #27 of 39 Old 02-21-2020, 11:19 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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One woodworking machine?

Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
There's a reason they are called "hand tools" and "woodworking machines'.
Ok, if only one tool, for me would be a Japanese pull saw Dozuki:
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=Japanese+...f=nb_sb_noss_2

Next choice, a Japanese pull type wood base plane:
https://www.amazon.com/Daikichi-Japa.../dp/B003EIG856
If I could only have one woodworking machine it would have to be a radial arm saw. By far the most versatile machine I know of. I like them so much I own 4, maybe 5 of them. Why? I found out about 5 years ago that you can remove the saw carriage from one and slide it onto the rails of a different machine, and the 10" RASs are the same as the 12" RASs in Craftsman's line. I own both sizes, but prefer the 12" because the motor is more powerful.

So, what's the advantage to that? You can setup one carriage with a dado stack, another with a 60 tooth crosscut blade, another with my special router carriage, and so forth and never need to change a blade. OK, that saves time, but also saves floor space since you can use the same table and arm for all the various operations. They are so cheap on the used market that you can afford to get several as I did.


https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/memb...-modification/


Then there's all the different operations you can do with a RAS .... ripping, crosscuts, bevels, cove cuts and miters with a saw blade(S). Then a doda set for rabbets or dados, but limited in length to about 15" in crosscut mode, unlimited lengths in rip mode. If you have a molding head, you can make different shaped profiles for moldings. You can get a surface planer attachment for making a smooth surface on rough stock. I even saw a You Tube where a guy uses that to level out a surface like a top sided jointer by wedging up the low corner on a twisted board on a sled. That's nothing I would do today since I have a jointer and a planer, but I could do it if limited to one machine. It's very versatile. What about a grinding wheel? What about a sanding disc? What about using the opposite end of the arbor with a 3 jaw chuck as a horizontal drill or mortiser?

The speed is a bit too slow for routing at 4500 RPMs but a Forstner bit would be suitable if not too large.

What about this "modification" ......
https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/memb...aw-bill-small/



The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 02-21-2020 at 12:31 PM.
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post #28 of 39 Old 02-21-2020, 12:32 PM
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My choice is an angle grinder.. All in one..
It is very multifunction..
There are a few videos..

SM-J700F cihazımdan Tapatalk kullanılarak gönderildi

SECOND CHANCE & SECOND LİFE
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post #29 of 39 Old 02-21-2020, 04:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shop_Rat View Post
Hands Down, radial arm saw!
What does a RAsaw do that a table saw won't?

If I only had one tool, I would be seriously crippled. I suppose I could make fence pickets or pallets.
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post #30 of 39 Old 02-21-2020, 05:59 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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Did you read post 27 by chance?

Quote:
Originally Posted by LilysDad View Post
What does a RAsaw do that a table saw won't?

If I only had one tool, I would be seriously crippled. I suppose I could make fence pickets or pallets.

I explained everything a RAS can do..... and maybe I left something out, I donno? I did NOT compare it to a table saw, I'll leave that for you to do.
BTW, did you ever own one? or use one?

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 02-21-2020 at 06:06 PM.
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post #31 of 39 Old 02-21-2020, 07:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
BTW, did you ever own one? or use one?
Yup! I hated it. I believe it is a safety nightmare.
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post #32 of 39 Old 02-21-2020, 08:10 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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We have vastly different experiences then .....

Quote:
Originally Posted by LilysDad View Post
Yup! I hated it. I believe it is a safety nightmare.

I've never had a single issue with mine in 30 years. I am self-taught for the most part as You Tube wasn't around 30 years ago. If you understand the physics of a top cutting blade that will go a long way in making you a safer woodworker. It's very much like a circular saw, except it's nit "hand held". Table saws cut from the bottom upwards so they have different forces acting on the material. I am not ever going to convince you otherwise, so I won't even try. I love mine, however.
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #33 of 39 Old 02-22-2020, 12:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LilysDad View Post

What does a RAsaw do that a table saw won't?
Well, unlike a table saw, the RAS needs no jigs or special fixtures to do most of it’s cool stuff. Since the RAS is a finished solution as is, I would say I think for this challenge, your TS needs to be the bare tool, no jigs or fixtures allowed.

Suddenly the TS isn’t so attractive when the topic becomes tenons or cross cuts....

Btw, I used to have a nice cabinet saw, then I bought my first RAS. After some evolution in my quiver, I have 2 RAS. Oh yea, the blades are really easy to change since they’re easily accessible from the top side of the table. I hated changing blades on my TS.
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post #34 of 39 Old 02-24-2020, 10:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Scurvy View Post
Well, unlike a table saw, the RAS needs no jigs or special fixtures to do most of it’s cool stuff. Since the RAS is a finished solution as is, I would say I think for this challenge, your TS needs to be the bare tool, no jigs or fixtures allowed.

Suddenly the TS isn’t so attractive when the topic becomes tenons or cross cuts....
Do you consider the cross slide and fence to be special?

I'm happy for you folks that you enjoy the RAS so much. I find that ripping on one is not comfortable. That big motor/blade is hanging right up there and I have had it kick back and fire that board away at high speed.
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post #35 of 39 Old 02-24-2020, 04:48 PM
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Originally Posted by LilysDad View Post
…. I find that ripping on one is not comfortable. That big motor/blade is hanging right up there and I have had it kick back and fire that board away at high speed.
Chances are that you either bound up the material (easily done on a table saw), fed the material too fast (also easily done on a table saw), were using a dull blade (also easily done on a table saw), or had a poor grip on your material (yes, again can easily done on a table saw).

Radial arm saws verses table saws have been debated half to death, not only here, but at just about every other woodworking venue on the Internet. Those that like them like them, and those that don't well, just don't. Both machines can impale you with kickbacked lumber, and both machines can crosscut or rip your finger off without so much as a whimper. In my eyes neither one is more or less safe than the other. Treat either one of them with disrespect and either one of them will make you pay for it. Use the thing between your ears and you will likely never have an issue. I have both and use both. Ripping is easier on the TS. Crosscutting is hands down easier on the RAS (much easier to move the tool than to move the work).

Bottom line, I'm soooo glad I don't have to choose only one tool. I love my versatile shop. There are very few operations I can't do with my myriad tools. I'm only limited to my own skillset and imagination.
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Another $000,000,000.02 worth of advice,
Mark
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post #36 of 39 Old 02-25-2020, 07:50 AM
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First saw I bought was a circular saw. I am still surprised at everything I was able to make it do when that was all I had.
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post #37 of 39 Old 02-25-2020, 02:50 PM
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You can technically make a bowl with a tablesaw but not a radial. Or maybe you can and I just haven't seen it yet.
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post #38 of 39 Old 02-25-2020, 11:52 PM
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Imagine this, doing everything with only a single chisel. From cutting down a tree, to machining the lumber, joinery everything. It's totally possible, stupid but possible.



-T
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post #39 of 39 Old 02-26-2020, 08:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phaelax View Post
You can technically make a bowl with a tablesaw but not a radial. Or maybe you can and I just haven't seen it yet.
It could be done, but I wouldn't want to try it!

Like with a table saw, you'd want to build a jig that lets you slowly move the blade into the bowl blank, and then rotate one of them. It's got to be a really sturdy jig, though, and a lot more of the blade on the RAS is going to be exposed.

(Or you could use a RAS with a power takeoff, and do most of the work with router or shaper bits. That would probably be a lot safer.)
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