If you had to spend $250 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 19 Old 12-08-2017, 10:18 AM Thread Starter
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If you had to spend $250

So at my real job we get anniversary gifts at 5,10,15 year, ect... I have my 5 year coming up and will have $250 to spend. I'm having a heck of a time trying to decide what to get so I figured I would let you guys help me out with some ideas. One thing to point out, I work out of a single stall garage so space is limited.

So far my ideas are:
Good hand planes. I have a #4 and #60 1/2 Stanley Sweethearts that I really like so I could add to that set.
Grizzly 12x18 Variable speed lathe. I'd have to kick in a few bucks to get this one but I've always thought a lathe would be fun. Would this one be decent? I'd likely only turn small items and maybe some small bowls.
Small dust collector. I currently only use a shop vac.
Some type of finish spraying system.

Any additional ideas in the few hundred dollar range feel free to throw them out!

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Last edited by nxtgeneration; 12-08-2017 at 10:24 AM.
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post #2 of 19 Old 12-08-2017, 10:43 AM
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#1 dustcollector
then lathe because sanding on lathe makes a lot of shavings and dust
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post #3 of 19 Old 12-08-2017, 11:15 AM
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It's hard to say what would benefit you the most, since I don't really know what you have. In that price range, though, things that spring to my mind are:

1) A couple of nice handsaws. Maybe a Veritas dovetail saw and a decent tenon saw.
2) A decent plow plane.
3) A good smoothing plane.
4) An upgrade to your dust collection.
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post #4 of 19 Old 12-08-2017, 11:21 AM Thread Starter
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Good thoughts

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Originally Posted by amckenzie4 View Post
It's hard to say what would benefit you the most, since I don't really know what you have. In that price range, though, things that spring to my mind are:

1) A couple of nice handsaws. Maybe a Veritas dovetail saw and a decent tenon saw.
2) A decent plow plane.
3) A good smoothing plane.
4) An upgrade to your dust collection.
Yes, Some nice handsaws were a thought as well.

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post #5 of 19 Old 12-08-2017, 11:44 AM
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Send it to me??? I have lots of ideas on how to spend it. OK, what projects do you have in the works that might require a tool that you don't have? Like having a nickel in a candy store, isn't it?

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
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post #6 of 19 Old 12-08-2017, 11:56 AM
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Hang on to it til you really need something, you will be glad you did.
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post #7 of 19 Old 12-08-2017, 12:15 PM Thread Starter
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Hang on to it til you really need something, you will be glad you did.
Unfortunately I can't. You tell them what you want and they order it or they will refund you on your purchase but keeping the money cash isn't an option.

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post #8 of 19 Old 12-08-2017, 01:05 PM
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Take it from someone who is battling the dust side of woodworking...dust collector! Happy Anniversary!

But the wisdom that is from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, and easy to be intreated, full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality, and without hypocrisy. James 3:17
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post #9 of 19 Old 12-08-2017, 01:38 PM
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Another thing that occurs to me is good cordless tools, if you don't already have them. Even just a drill and impact driver set can make a huge difference over corded tools.
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post #10 of 19 Old 12-08-2017, 02:39 PM
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Or an air filter to keep the dust down. Even a shop vac and dust collector allow the finest and worst dust for your lungs to pass through. I consider one essential.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
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post #11 of 19 Old 12-08-2017, 03:18 PM
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Previous posters have already said this but in an effort to help you we would need to know what tools you already own. Not knowing that makes it impossible to suggest something new.
If you donít own a router already I suggest a router with a collection of router bits.
If you already have a router but no router table, I suggest a router table with fence and Miter.
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If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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post #12 of 19 Old 12-08-2017, 03:35 PM
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To follow Toolman50's post- I have the Kreg router table. It is very sturdy and well worth the $$$ unless you decide to build your own. I looked at others and crossed them off the list.

A diamond is how coal reacts under pressure.
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post #13 of 19 Old 12-08-2017, 04:32 PM
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I like the cordless tool or the router suggestions.

If you already have a battery platform that you use now, expand your tool options by adding to it and get a couple bare tools you have been thinking about. If you don't already have a platform, select one and get a good starter package. Maybe even add some money to it and get one of the more complete sets.

Pick up a router kit. You can find a Dewalt kit with a fixed base, plunge base and D-handle for right around that much money.

Good luck and have fun spending the money.
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post #14 of 19 Old 12-08-2017, 04:39 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolman50 View Post
Previous posters have already said this but in an effort to help you we would need to know what tools you already own. Not knowing that makes it impossible to suggest something new.
If you donít own a router already I suggest a router with a collection of router bits.
If you already have a router but no router table, I suggest a router table with fence and Miter.
Sorry, I should've been a little more clear.

General tools I own: table saw, compound miter saw, planer, jointer, full size router w/ table, trim router, various cordless tools, 14" bandsaw, biscuit jointer, drill press.

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post #15 of 19 Old 12-08-2017, 07:18 PM
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Homeowner?

Quote:
Originally Posted by amckenzie4 View Post
Another thing that occurs to me is good cordless tools, if you don't already have them. Even just a drill and impact driver set can make a huge difference over corded tools.

There is barely a week that goes by that I don't use a portable/cordless tool of some kind as a homeowner, DIY'r, car mechanic. Those 5 tool sets are on sale all around these days. I love Milwaukees, but Rigid has a great warranty on the tools and the batteries from Home Depot.

If you don't have a decent wood vise, that will help with your hand tool projects like planing and sawing. A good set of Forstner bits is always needed. A few good table saw blades is a good addition to any shop.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #16 of 19 Old 12-08-2017, 07:34 PM
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I would highly recommend a dust collector system. I can't speak for the quality of the Grizzly lathe but wood turning is very fun and relaxing and enjoyable. Wood turning can also get very expensive in itself, not only do you need the lathe but the turning tools, a grinder and a jig to sharpen the tools, etc.
I know, decisions, decisions, decisions!!!!
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post #17 of 19 Old 12-08-2017, 08:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nxtgeneration View Post
Sorry, I should've been a little more clear.

General tools I own: table saw, compound miter saw, planer, jointer, full size router w/ table, trim router, various cordless tools, 14" bandsaw, biscuit jointer, drill press.
In a somewhat jealous voice; sheesh if I had all those tools I would buy wood...
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post #18 of 19 Old 12-08-2017, 08:33 PM
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250 isn't a lot. I think I would spend it on wood.
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post #19 of 19 Old 12-08-2017, 09:19 PM
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250 isn't a lot. I think I would spend it on wood.
I agree. $250 worth of hardwood will build a nice project. I

If you don't have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?
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