How should I tackle this? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 40 Old 05-24-2020, 10:58 AM Thread Starter
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How should I tackle this?

Replacing baseboards in my house and I come across a rounded corner on the bathroom. I can’t necessarily just bend the baseboard to fit so I’m wondering what I could do to make it look good. I tried chiseling the wall to make an angle cut fit but as you can see it looks bad. Any ideas are greatly appreciated.
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post #2 of 40 Old 05-24-2020, 12:00 PM
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square peg into a round hole

Quote:
Replacing baseboards in my house and I come across
a rounded corner in the bathroom.

How should I tackle this?-corner.jpg

do you have just this one corner issue to address in the whole house ??

in my world, the horizontal baseboards goes on after all the
vertical case work as been done. then fine-tune the base
to meet the vertical trim. (but, that is just me).
when I have had to use wood base molding in a rounded corner,
I made myself a soft cushion of folded up drop cloths and broke out
my favorite can of Bondo to artfully finesse the molding to match
the round corner. (IF you wanted to go that route).

if you are not in a hurry, you could fabricate a small (2x2') duplicate
of your corner and practice making the molding fit (visually).
then, you could sit at the kitchen table or your shop work bench
to do the practicing.

others more experienced than me may have a better solution.
keep us in the loop with photos when you get started and the finished project.

.

there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks.

Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 05-24-2020 at 12:38 PM. Reason: added photo
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post #3 of 40 Old 05-24-2020, 12:17 PM
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The inverse of this, 22.5 degree cuts with a small piece in the corner, a little caulk to fill the gap.

https://www.rockler.com/bench-dog-bullnose-trim-gauge
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post #4 of 40 Old 05-24-2020, 12:24 PM Thread Starter
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John - yes it’s just this one corner. The vert casing is in already, it’s hard to see in the picture and it’s thinner than the original so I have some touching up to do still.

I’ll consider the options you listed. I was thinking of steam bending to loosen the glue in the mdf but then I’m not sure if it makes the material unstable. Another option was to maybe cut small angles and finish it up using caulking.

I’m still new to trim work so I don’t have the skills yet to envision how this would work
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Last edited by Noek; 05-24-2020 at 12:53 PM.
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post #5 of 40 Old 05-24-2020, 01:11 PM
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Could you make a corner plinth the back of which matches the radius of the wall, then butt the moulding into it?

Here's a picture of a corner plinth; imagine it with the back radiused to match your wall.
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Last edited by Quickstep; 05-24-2020 at 01:13 PM.
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post #6 of 40 Old 05-24-2020, 02:18 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quickstep View Post
Could you make a corner plinth the back of which matches the radius of the wall, then butt the moulding into it?

Here's a picture of a corner plinth; imagine it with the back radiused to match your wall.
That’s a great idea too. As long as the radius matches. Would look fancy too.
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post #7 of 40 Old 05-24-2020, 04:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Noek View Post
Thats a great idea too. As long as the radius matches. Would look fancy too.

I was thinking you just make the radius match by shaving the back of the plinth until it's a perfect fit. Start off with angled cuts and plane from there.
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post #8 of 40 Old 05-24-2020, 04:08 PM
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I can't imagine what this would cost, but if the profile you need happens to be standard for them...

https://www.distinctivewood.com/curved-mouldings
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post #9 of 40 Old 05-24-2020, 05:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shoot summ View Post
The inverse of this, 22.5 degree cuts with a small piece in the corner, a little caulk to fill the gap.
i think this is the pic shoot sum meant, inverse of this, 22.5 with a small piece inserted
and that's what i would do


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post #10 of 40 Old 05-24-2020, 05:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Noek View Post
Replacing baseboards in my house and I come across a rounded corner on the bathroom. I cant necessarily just bend the baseboard to fit so Im wondering what I could do to make it look good. I tried chiseling the wall to make an angle cut fit but as you can see it looks bad. Any ideas are greatly appreciated.
as long as you've been a member, you don't know how to post pics?
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post #11 of 40 Old 05-24-2020, 05:46 PM
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Inside Corner Profile

the issue is for an inside corner - not an outside.
I too would like to know how you guys would address this one.
and maintain the continuous flow of the profile in the baseboard.

How should I tackle this?-corner.jpg

.

there is no educational alternative to having a front row seat in the School of Hard Knocks.

Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 05-24-2020 at 06:15 PM.
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post #12 of 40 Old 05-24-2020, 05:48 PM
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I was a clay modeler in a previous life ......

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Smith_inFL View Post
Attachment 390047

do you have just this one corner issue to address in the whole house ??

in my world, the horizontal baseboards goes on after all the
vertical case work as been done. then fine-tune the base
to meet the vertical trim. (but, that is just me).
when I have had to use wood base molding in a rounded corner,
I made myself a soft cushion of folded up drop cloths and broke out
my favorite can of Bondo to artfully finesse the molding to match
the round corner. (IF you wanted to go that route).


if you are not in a hurry, you could fabricate a small (2x2') duplicate
of your corner and practice making the molding fit (visually).
then, you could sit at the kitchen table or your shop work bench
to do the practicing.

others more experienced than me may have a better solution.
keep us in the loop with photos when you get started and the finished project.

.

Modeling curves and shapes in automotive thermoplastic clay was freehand or we used metal templates with the shape cut in and "dragged" them on reference surfaces to main the lines and the depths. So, in this case, a concave corner would benefit from a curved rail at the base to ride your wood template on, the radius being the same as the corner. That's more work of course, but it will save you hours of figiting by hand with gouges and chisels and sanding.


This video demonstrates the versatility of Bondo in repairing missing or damaged wood. It's too runny to hold it's own shape until it hardens, unlike clay or plaster. However, it's homogeneous so it will carve easier than wood. A surface that's slowly built up in layers would be better in this case. A piece of PVC pipe that's the same inner radius could be pressed into the Bondo before it totally sets up for a quicker approach, just use a release agent, cooking spray will work to keep it from sticking to the pipe.



No matter, it's an ambitious project to carve, mold or model the inside corner but it would eventually give the best result and a smooth flowing transition.


Dragging a plaster cornice using a metal template:

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 05-24-2020 at 06:03 PM.
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post #13 of 40 Old 05-24-2020, 06:32 PM
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The easy answer is to fit the short base to the inside corner by rounding the end. Then the long base is coped.
Looking at the profile of your base it is a difficult profile to cope. I will attempt to walk you thru it.
Saw a 45 inside miter on the long base. The cope has to be 45 or more. I use a saber saw. The saw base is set at 0 , another words the base is square to the blade. When the saw base is flat on the saw cut it automatically saws at 45.
Use a 14 TPI blade or finer. Make relief cuts first where the saw has to turn. There is one area that needs to be paper thin.
The bottom of the base is a straight saw cut til you get to the " flat". This flat has to be filed ,sanded etc. thin or the base will not fit. I use sanding sticks made from scrap wood and adhesive sandpaper, 100 grit. Dowels too with sandpaper.
These work better than rasps or files.
If you know a trim carpenter, ask him for help if needed. Otherwise, practice coping on scrap.
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post #14 of 40 Old 05-24-2020, 08:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Smith_inFL View Post
the issue is for an inside corner - not an outside.
I too would like to know how you guys would address this one.
and maintain the continuous flow of the profile in the baseboard.

Attachment 390063

.
@_Ogre picked up on what I meant. I understand it is an inside corner, just invert the pic he posted, instead of an outside corner, use the same method for an inside corner.

I'm pretty OCD, and there is no way I would go to some of the extremes suggested in this thread, it's baseboard. But the suggestions are interesting...
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post #15 of 40 Old 05-24-2020, 08:11 PM
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What Ogre said. Segment the corner so there is a small piece in the center with the two walls running into it. If the overall corner is a 90 deg., then each segment will be 22.5 deg. The piece will be small, so you and attach it by micro pinning it or better yet with 2P-10 or other CA glue.
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post #16 of 40 Old 05-24-2020, 08:13 PM
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I don't see how you can cope this corner .....

The curve on the wall starts back way before the base could be coped. You need to add a blank plinth block and carve it to start the curves where the wall is, not let the base determine where they start. A cut on the bandsw that matches the wall radius would be a start but leave enough material to carve away. You could trace the profiles from the ends on the faces of the blank on either side. That will get you started with all the horizontal lines. There's just no easy way to make concave ogee curves in a blank piece of stock other than carve it or rout it away where possible.



I wish I was wrong, but someone would have to show me a coped curved corner just like this .......
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #17 of 40 Old 05-24-2020, 08:40 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _Ogre View Post
as long as you've been a member, you don't know how to post pics?
Ive never posted from my phone before, sorry.
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post #18 of 40 Old 05-24-2020, 08:45 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all of the good ideas. I am going to try a few of them out and see where it gets me. It's really the only concave curve in my house and why they did this to the wall is beyond me. I think I will try what Summ and Ogre are explaining, it looks fairly straightforward, but not easy at all.
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post #19 of 40 Old 05-24-2020, 09:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Noek View Post
Thanks for all of the good ideas. I am going to try a few of them out and see where it gets me. It's really the only concave curve in my house and why they did this to the wall is beyond me. I think I will try what Summ and Ogre are explaining, it looks fairly straightforward, but not easy at all.
Summ & Ogre have hit the nail on the head, not that difficult, just fill the openings and you are golden.
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post #20 of 40 Old 05-25-2020, 07:23 AM
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Whenever I try to add a photo it always shows up as a link. Am I missing something or are there some instructions for how to add (drag) an actual photo? (not that I have anything to show)
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