How to roundover 6" circles with router? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 19 Old 03-14-2020, 02:18 AM Thread Starter
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Question How to roundover 6" circles with router?

Hi all,

I have about 300 wood circles that are 6" in diameter, made out of 1/2" plywood (cut with hole saw) - I used to own a cornhole business and kept all of the circles for some reason. I finally decided that a large wall art piece was the reason and I'm looking to clean them up. I want to put a small round over on each side of the circle. What's the best/safest way to do this? Screw them down and go around each with a router? Could I use a router table? Any other solutions?

Thanks!
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post #2 of 19 Old 03-14-2020, 02:40 AM
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1/4" roundover bit in a router table.
Safest and easiest.

Use either a starter pin, or the fence to rest the wood against and then slowly feed the wood into the bit. If you arent experienced with this, it may be worth taking a smaller cut to start with.
be VERY CAREFUL not to allow your fingers to be pulled towards the bit just in case the wood snatches. Use a gripper block of some description.
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post #3 of 19 Old 03-14-2020, 03:06 AM
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Another method, maybe safer .......

Since they already have a 1/4" center hole, use a flat head screw to secure them to the bench or a larger plywood panel. Then use your hand held router to round over the edge. This way your hands and fingers are no where near a spinning router bit. The screw head should not be in the way of the router's base. I'd use a palm size router, my Dewalt 611.








https://www.popularwoodworking.com/p...uter-tear-out/





You may find that the 1/2" ply will not totally register the bearing on the bottom edge when you flip it over. In that case, just stack another one underneath to provide more width/thickness.
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The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 03-14-2020 at 04:16 AM.
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post #4 of 19 Old 03-14-2020, 08:32 AM
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How to roundover 6&quot; circles with router?-12053_5f00_081.jpg

in my very personal opinion (and way of doing things),
this photo is misleading: (without fully reading the Popular Woodworking article).
when routing an outside edge with a hand-held router, move counterclockwise.
when routing an irregular shape or the inside of a circle, move clockwise.
when the router is inverted, like in a router table, the opposite rule applies.
there are many articles on the WWW if you google: Understanding Router Feed.


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Last edited by John Smith_inFL; 03-14-2020 at 08:50 AM.
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post #5 of 19 Old 03-14-2020, 08:50 AM
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That's a climb cut, to reduce tearout.

https://www.popularwoodworking.com/p...uter-tear-out/




The article linked directly above explains why you would use this "reverse" feed direction in two steps, in order to reduce tearout. It also indicates the area where it should be used which may be more prone to tearout because of the grain direction. Normally, the feed direction would be counter clockwise on an outside edge.
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post #6 of 19 Old 03-14-2020, 09:11 AM
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yes - I was referencing just by looking at that one photo, like a novice would do.
the first photo is correct in all aspects. (I did not watch the video). without reading the link.
I have seen that a lot of folks, including myself, do not open links if there are photos posted.

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post #7 of 19 Old 03-14-2020, 09:58 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you all for the quick responses! I recently replaced an old craftsman tabletop table (where a 2x4 was my fence) with a Bosch table but haven’t done much with it yet. I would personally feel the most comfortable screwing the circles down and routing, but with there being 300, I was checking to see if the router table would be easy/safe. I don’t have a proper shop...Have a 6x22’ tool room, but am unable to actually work inside of it. I drag everything outside or to another room. No permanent setup makes it difficult at times. &#x1f642;

This is unrelated, but thoughts on filling the center pilot while when done? I kinda like the thought of a contrasting peg but again...300 of them, the easiest solution will likely win.
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post #8 of 19 Old 03-14-2020, 10:09 AM
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You are going to wall mount them?

Why not use flat head screws to mount them and fill the small recess with Bondo or wood filler?

As far as speed of routing for 300 pieces, use an impact driver or powered screw driver on slow RPMs with a square head Robertson type driver. They hold the screws on the bit the best. Flat head "slotted" or Phillips will not hold the screw onto the bit unless the magnet is very strong.


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #9 of 19 Old 03-14-2020, 11:29 AM
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Because you are wanting roundover on both sides, it is 1/2 round. You can buying bullnose bit. If using roudover 1/4 round bit, must also be using router table. woonthings correct. When flipping circle for second cut, bearing going in more and second roundover cut being bad.

For half round 300 circles, better having jig or adjusting fence for perfect cuts. And clamping finger guard protector to fence top for keeping fingers farther from router bit danger.
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post #10 of 19 Old 03-14-2020, 02:48 PM
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If you are going to use a handheld router with them fastened to a board they will likely have to be stacked two high to begin with, there is no router bit that is short enough to miss the mounting board on the first pass and then magically extends to reach the bottom round on the second pass.

Ignore above, hate keyboard woodworking, so went out to shop.

Checked my 1/4" round over bit, bottom of bearing is 1/2" from top, but screw head is protruding, so second side would be difficult to do. Greater round over diameter would work stacked two high, bottom disk would act as template for both passes.

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Last edited by FrankC; 03-14-2020 at 03:18 PM.
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post #11 of 19 Old 03-14-2020, 03:43 PM
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Exactly what I said .....

Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post


You may find that the 1/2" ply will not totally register the bearing on the bottom edge when you flip it over. In that case, just stack another one underneath to provide more width/thickness.
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
If you are going to use a handheld router with them fastened to a board they will likely have to be stacked two high to begin with, there is no router bit that is short enough to miss the mounting board on the first pass and then magically extends to reach the bottom round on the second pass.

Ignore above, hate keyboard woodworking, so went out to shop.

Checked my 1/4" round over bit, bottom of bearing is 1/2" from top, but screw head is protruding, so second side would be difficult to do. Greater round over diameter would work stacked two high, bottom disk would act as template for both passes.

The screw head would not "protrude' if it were a flat head, as I mentioned some where previously ...?

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #12 of 19 Old 03-14-2020, 11:01 PM
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Query "disk round over jig". One can be found on instructablesdotcom.

I have seen this jig in use on a Woodsmith Shop episode (at least I think it was Woodsmith Shop as that's the only woodworking show I PVR). The show provided instructions on how to build one, and I tried to find the particular episode but have been unsuccessful.

It's a simple jig made out of a small scrap of 1/4 inch or so MDF or similar. A 90 degree notch and small round hole are cut out to "trap" the disk, and the setup is used on a router table. Extremely easy to make and use. The hole is for the router bit and the notch is where the disk is held and spun around.

Takes about ten/fifteen minutes to make and less than a minute per disk to round over.

Marv
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post #13 of 19 Old 03-15-2020, 12:06 AM
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You want to build a 90 degree jig to “trap” the circle while you run the circle edge on a round over bit similar to the picture below.
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post #14 of 19 Old 03-15-2020, 12:18 AM
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I am trying to envision this ^

What I came up with is a scrap with a 6" diameter hole cut out. A cut is made along one side leaving just a small amount of the diameter exposed which will capture the disc. This flat side is placed against the fence so that the round over bit can function as designed. You then clamp it in place on the table so it can't move. Now you slowly rotate the disc within the hole and perform the round over all the way around. Then flip it over and do the other side. I would need to make one to see if my "theory" would work..... ?

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #15 of 19 Old 03-15-2020, 03:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marpel1956? View Post
Query "disk round over jig". One can be found on instructablesdotcom.

Marv
https://www.instructables.com/id/DISK-ROUND-OVER-JIG/
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post #16 of 19 Old 03-15-2020, 08:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
What I came up with is a scrap with a 6" diameter hole cut out. A cut is made along one side leaving just a small amount of the diameter exposed which will capture the disc. This flat side is placed against the fence so that the round over bit can function as designed. You then clamp it in place on the table so it can't move. Now you slowly rotate the disc within the hole and perform the round over all the way around. Then flip it over and do the other side. I would need to make one to see if my "theory" would work..... ?
I am having trouble visualizing how to rotate the disc.
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post #17 of 19 Old 03-15-2020, 09:19 AM
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Just turn it by hand friction ....

Quote:
Originally Posted by ducbsa View Post
I am having trouble visualizing how to rotate the disc.

You should be able to rotate the disc by pressing down on it while turning at the same time ... I donno, never tried this approach myself. It looks like the instructables link is easier anyway. My approach is diameter specific, so it may be safer, but I donno?


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #18 of 19 Old 03-15-2020, 01:14 PM
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It would seem all you really need is two stops on either side if the router bit to prevent disk from moving too far forward, particularly on second pass, just a matter of positioning them.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #19 of 19 Old 03-16-2020, 02:12 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you all! I like the Instructables approach and think I may start there. This has all been very helpful!
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