How to make U-shaped notch in bracket - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 11 Old 06-23-2014, 12:21 AM Thread Starter
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How to make U-shaped notch in bracket

Hi,

I have some wood curtain rod brackets that I would like to make a notch into to add a second rod for sheer curtains. I've attached a couple pf pictures showing the bracket.

I'm thinking the notch should be around 3/4", U-shaped and between the existing rod and the wall. I have an oscillating tool and a hand-saw but am not averse to getting more tools if they are not too expensive.

Could you help me with the easiest way to make this notch?

Thanks.
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post #2 of 11 Old 06-23-2014, 12:28 AM
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Do you want the notch on the top behind the curtain rod? Okay I just Reread your post. Don't answer that.

I would drill a hole just below the top with a hole saw bit. Buy a cheap one. Then saw out the top section to let the rod. I would also have the rod to be placed in hand when getting the hole saw bit. It may be smaller or bigger than 3/4". If you don't have a drill borrow one unless you plan to use it again. Drill the hole one size larger than the rod.

Al



Last edited by Al B Thayer; 06-23-2014 at 12:35 AM.
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post #3 of 11 Old 06-23-2014, 12:58 AM
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I don't think the brackes are large enough to cut a second notch. I think it would weaken it enough to break. You might be able to screw some kind of hardware to the face of the bracket to do the job. Depending on the size of the rod perhaps a conduit strap would work. It could be painted close to the color of the wood.
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post #4 of 11 Old 06-23-2014, 01:12 AM
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After a closer look at the second picture. I would still put a notch in it. These don't carry much weight and are far stronger than many window treatment brackets.

Al


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post #5 of 11 Old 06-23-2014, 01:23 AM
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Penny for your thoughts Need a few more details what are the curtain rod hangers for the sheers going to be size wise reason I ask is there needs to be so working space between the wall and the back of the curtain hangers this would also be counting the window frame in second photo. Are the brackets held in place with what type of anchor mine use a keyhole slot and rolly plugs . Do you have access to a drill press if so a jig could be made b wood where you drill into some scab wood and the bracket ensuring a clean cut. Look forward to info you can provide us.

Jerry
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post #6 of 11 Old 06-23-2014, 02:04 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks very much for your help, everyone. I really appreciate it.

I do have a drill and even a drill guide. If I were to use the hole saw bit and saw, should I unscrew the brackets from the wall, or do this in place while they are attached? I'm only concerned that after screwing them back they might be a bit loose.

Steve, Thanks for the warning. Do you think it will be ok if I make a notch less than the depth of the new rod and just deep enough for the new rod to sit securely?

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Originally Posted by wood shavings View Post
Penny for your thoughts Need a few more details what are the curtain rod hangers for the sheers going to be size wise reason I ask is there needs to be so working space between the wall and the back of the curtain hangers this would also be counting the window frame in second photo. Are the brackets held in place with what type of anchor mine use a keyhole slot and rolly plugs . Do you have access to a drill press if so a jig could be made b wood where you drill into some scab wood and the bracket ensuring a clean cut. Look forward to info you can provide us.

Jerry
I'm afraid I don't know the anchor type as I haven't removed the brackets yet. (The previous resident had installed them.) I haven't yet worked out where to get the new rod or how to hang the sheers on it. Do you have any suggestions given the working space requirements you mentioned? Also, I'm afraid I don't have a drill press but I do have a drill guide.

Thanks again everyone.
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post #7 of 11 Old 06-23-2014, 02:17 AM
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You will have to take the bracket off the wall . When using the drill you will have tear out if it is not backed up with some scrap wood also where you what to drill your slot for lack of better term the drill more than likely will drill an angle hole do to the distance to the wall. Also any pressure you put on the bracket while on the wall will weaken it and it may come away from the wall and then you have other problems.

Jerry
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post #8 of 11 Old 06-23-2014, 08:44 AM
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Take the brackets off the wall. Clamp a piece of sacrificial wood to the bracket. Use a hole saw or a 1" diameter bit and drill through the sacrificial wood so that the center of the bit is just at the edge of the bracket. The sacrificial wood keeps the bit in line. A 1" hole saw would probably be best as it is "tall" enough to keep the surface of the saw contained by the sacrificial wood.

George

Alternately, if you have a drill press, you could clamp the bracket to the drill press table. Then drill the hole without the sacrificial wood. In this case I would use a forstner bit.
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post #9 of 11 Old 06-23-2014, 09:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
Take the brackets off the wall. Clamp a piece of sacrificial wood to the bracket. Use a hole saw or a 1" diameter bit and drill through the sacrificial wood so that the center of the bit is just at the edge of the bracket. The sacrificial wood keeps the bit in line. A 1" hole saw would probably be best as it is "tall" enough to keep the surface of the saw contained by the sacrificial wood.

George

Alternately, if you have a drill press, you could clamp the bracket to the drill press table. Then drill the hole without the sacrificial wood. In this case I would use a forstner bit.
+1. Essentially you will be drilling half a hole. In using that drill guide, I would clamp down the parts so they don't get caught by the bit.






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post #10 of 11 Old 06-23-2014, 10:58 AM
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I think you are putting the cart before the horse, get a new rod first, then figure out how to mount it. You don't mention the span, shear curtains are not that heavy so you may not need a 3/4" rod, a smaller diameter expandable metal rod may work and there are several brackets available to use with them. Many of the thinner rods have center supports to prevent them from sagging.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #11 of 11 Old 06-23-2014, 04:54 PM
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First off, I'm positive that this can be done. Rod and sheers together don't weigh much at all.
Buy the curtain fixings.
I'd do exactly what GeorgeC describes in #8 but I'd go with the Forestner bit first. They are never cheap but you need a clean cut notch.
But first,
Clamp 2 pieces of scrap together, drill a hole to see what to expect and to measure against the new rod.
Then measure 5 times and do the real one as you get just one shot at it.
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