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post #1 of 24 Old 08-03-2013, 05:15 PM Thread Starter
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Question How to hang garage cabinet

Hello all,

I have built one prototype cabinet that I really like. Originally I thought I would hang the cabinet from the wall via one french cleat made from 3/4" plywood. Now I am a bit concerned about the cabinet's empty weight let alone once it is loaded down. So I was thinking about french cleats at the top and bottom but I am not sure that would work either.

Now am turning to you for your expert advice, opinions, and experience.

Should I use french cleats? If so how? Should I support the front bottom of the cabinet? Or should I just put wheels on the cabinet and be done with it?

Dimensions:

24" Deep, 36" wide, 69" tall.
3/4" side walls
2"x4" frames at top and bottom with 3/4" ply on the inside surface
1/4" back
3/4" MDF doors, each 17 15/16" wide.



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post #2 of 24 Old 08-03-2013, 05:25 PM
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French cleats top and bottom will be very difficult to position exactly, one or other will tend to support all of the weight. I would use one french cleat at the top and, if the weight is so great, reinforce the cabinet. 3/4 ply should be plenty strong enough unless you plan to store gold bullion.

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post #3 of 24 Old 08-03-2013, 05:29 PM Thread Starter
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Chat, what do you mean "reinforce the cabinet"? This seems to imply I built it wrong which is entirely possible.
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post #4 of 24 Old 08-03-2013, 05:36 PM
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If it was me I would just glue and nail a piece of 3/4"x2" pine at the top back to hang the cabinet. As long as the cabinet is wide enough you can catch two studs, two 3" drywall screws will hold the cabinet from now on. French cleats are alright but you need to recess the back in 3/4" when you are building the cabinet. Even with the french cleat I would put screws through the inside of the cabinet for what you are doing. Most of the time I've used french cleats was in doctors offices where code wouldn't allow an internal hanger.
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post #5 of 24 Old 08-03-2013, 05:39 PM
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Screwed my cabinets right to the studs. No issues.
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post #6 of 24 Old 08-03-2013, 05:43 PM
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If you can catch the studs, it's not going anywhere. It looks to be sitting on the floor, so cleats really aren't needed. What's the thickness of the back? If it's 3/4, I'd say you're good to go.

Last edited by Danno; 08-03-2013 at 05:45 PM.
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post #7 of 24 Old 08-03-2013, 05:48 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
French cleats are alright but you need to recess the back in 3/4" when you are building the cabinet.
What I was going to do was hang one long cleat on the all the length of the wall. This way I could place cabinets wherever I want them along the wall. I was thinking the cleat on the wall would be 6" tall with two 3" screws per stud.

Do you really think it would be enough?
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post #8 of 24 Old 08-03-2013, 05:49 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Danno View Post
If you can catch the studs, it's not going anywhere. It looks to be sitting on the floor, so cleats really aren't needed. What's the thickness of the back? If it's 3/4, I'd say you're good to go.
The current picture it's sitting on the floor because I have not hung it yet. I want to hang them where they are 18" off the floor. This gives me clear floor space to clean and store bins of stuff.

The back is 1/4" plywood but there is a frame made of 2"x4" at the top and bottom.
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post #9 of 24 Old 08-03-2013, 05:55 PM
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I have a lot of weight in these cabinets. One cleat at top with a spacer at the bottom.
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post #10 of 24 Old 08-03-2013, 05:57 PM Thread Starter
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Man. Picture worth a thousand words
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post #11 of 24 Old 08-03-2013, 06:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RETCW4AV8R View Post
What I was going to do was hang one long cleat on the all the length of the wall. This way I could place cabinets wherever I want them along the wall. I was thinking the cleat on the wall would be 6" tall with two 3" screws per stud.

Do you really think it would be enough?
Yes that would work if you have the cabinet part of the french cleat firmly fastened to the cabinet. It does make it convienient for a person to hang wall cabinets by theirselves. I always like to put a screw through the inside of the cabinet though when you get them in place. If for any reason the cabinet was bumped upward 3/4" it would come off the wall. One commercial shop I worked for had that happen in a doctors office. I don't have any details on how they did it, I just heard about it.
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post #12 of 24 Old 08-03-2013, 06:27 PM Thread Starter
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Well, it looks like I am all in. I will get to hanging the cleats tomorrow and see if it will hang from the wall ok.
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post #13 of 24 Old 08-03-2013, 09:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
Most of the time I've used french cleats was in doctors offices where code wouldn't allow an internal hanger.
I never heard of this before, and having done medical and other professional cabinetry installations in 3 different counties. Integral structuring for installations (internal hang rail) is an accepted method for wall attachment by AWI, ASID, IDSA, and KCMA standards.






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post #14 of 24 Old 08-03-2013, 09:27 PM
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Well, it looks like I am all in. I will get to hanging the cleats tomorrow and see if it will hang from the wall ok.
Cabinets will hang from a properly prepared and installed french cleat system (single one at the top). One little tip I suggest is that if the cabinet is to sit with its edges flat (or scribable) to the wall, would be to recess the cabinet member at least 1/8" or more to allow for the cabinet edge to project further than the back face of the cleat. This also provides a mounting advantage as the two mated cleats will not bottom out. Bottoming out could prevent the gravitational pull of the weight on the angles to remain. If the two cleats did bottom out, the cabinet member may have some movement.

Another method I use is to ease off the sharp edges of the two cleats. This will help minimize the possibility of chipping off some debris when installing, which may interfere with the system, and keeps the two cleats from bottoming out.






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post #15 of 24 Old 08-04-2013, 01:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RETCW4AV8R View Post

The current picture it's sitting on the floor because I have not hung it yet. I want to hang them where they are 18" off the floor. This gives me clear floor space to clean and store bins of stuff.

The back is 1/4" plywood but there is a frame made of 2"x4" at the top and bottom.
Ok..I stand corrected. If The back is only 1/4", I'd go with a cleat as well.
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post #16 of 24 Old 08-04-2013, 08:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RETCW4AV8R View Post
Hello all,

I have built one prototype cabinet that I really like. Originally I thought I would hang the cabinet from the wall via one french cleat made from 3/4" plywood. Now I am a bit concerned about the cabinet's empty weight let alone once it is loaded down. So I was thinking about french cleats at the top and bottom but I am not sure that would work either.

Now am turning to you for your expert advice, opinions, and experience.

Should I use french cleats? If so how? Should I support the front bottom of the cabinet? Or should I just put wheels on the cabinet and be done with it?

Dimensions:

24" Deep, 36" wide, 69" tall.
3/4" side walls
2"x4" frames at top and bottom with 3/4" ply on the inside surface
1/4" back
3/4" MDF doors, each 17 15/16" wide.



Why make this hanging of a cabinet(s) so difficult. Just use some carriage bolts and bolt to the garage wall studs.

George
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post #17 of 24 Old 08-04-2013, 10:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
I never heard of this before, and having done medical and other professional cabinetry installations in 3 different counties. Integral structuring for installations (internal hang rail) is an accepted method for wall attachment by AWI, ASID, IDSA, and KCMA standards.










.
Well that was more than 25 years ago and may have been a local code for Texas or Dallas. I’m no longer doing that kind of work so I don’t know if it is still being done. It was suppose to make it easier to sterilize the inside of the cabinet not to have the internal hanger.
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post #18 of 24 Old 08-05-2013, 07:17 PM Thread Starter
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Thumbs up

I finally got the cabinet on the wall.

I used 3/4" plywood for a 4" cleat on the wall. I placed two 3 1/2" deck screws per stud.

I used 3/4" plywood for a 3" cleat at the top edge of the back of the cabinet. This was glued and screwed to the 2x4 frame on the top of the cabinet.

Both cleats cut at a 45 degree angle with the point of the angle "eased" as suggested in another post in this topic.

I glued and nailed a 2" wide strip of 3/4" plywood at the bottom edge of the back of the cabinet.

The cabinet is hanging on the wall so there is 18" of space under the cabinet.

I actually stood in the cabinet while it was on the wall and it held me without any indication of failure. I am sure it will hold my motorcycle riding gear and some spare parts just fine.

Now I need to build cabinet to fill the remaining 5 feet of wall space.

See pictures at my album

<http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/membe...rage-cabinets/>
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post #19 of 24 Old 08-11-2013, 07:21 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
Why make this hanging of a cabinet(s) so difficult. Just use some carriage bolts and bolt to the garage wall studs.

George
George,

Because, if I want to move it, I can.

Fred
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post #20 of 24 Old 08-11-2013, 09:14 PM
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Carriage bolts are also very easy to remove.

George
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